Norman Inaba 1914-2003 [died age 89] servile to Mammon [money is god]

Norman flaunted Norman’s rich/powerful friends & Norman’s wealth by lining them up in the front rows at Norman’s mother’s funeral services,  overarched by expensive wreaths.   It’s not hard to fall for temptation to Mammon [materialism is the only thing which matters in life] as Norman did [& as current mayor Billy Kenoi does].   Norman easily crossed over from being the king of rural land developers & the ace in the hole for assimilation pundits [AJA Norman made it bigtime in haole-land, literally]  –  to Norman as Norman’s own god of wealth/power [ergo Mammon solon George Ariyoshi]  –  Norman became a god unto himself & others struck blindly by the glitter of gold/greed.

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Sadly, Norman became hostage to Norman’s own ego.    Yet, Norman’s older brother Minoru Gabby Inaba 1904-2002 is Kona’s greatest leader after Julian Yates 1885-1968.    And Gabby’s older brother Albert Inaba 1902-1977 is the George Washington of Moloka’i as its wondrous progressive educator.    Great baseballer Albert Baer [after Max Baer] Ikeda born 1932, Norman’s sister’s son, is named after Baer’s uncle Albert Inaba.    Norman’s granddaughter is gorgeous celebrity Carrie Inaba.   Baer’s sonkei mukashi no  [Nippon for "revere those who laid the path before/preceding us"] is fellow Konawaena High alumnus ’49 Minoru Jerry Omori born 1931, Omori becoming Bowling Greed State U. [teachers' college, Gabby connection] baseball Hall of Famer as a 2nd baseman, teammate a year younger Baer a catcher.     Omori batted 2nd, Baer 3rd.     Omori was invited for a major league tryout, but gave up because MLB hall of famer Nellie Fox was the team’s mainstay.    Omori ranks as the greatest 2nd baseman on my Big Island alltime mythic squad, w/Dennis Ueyama [Hilo High '62]/pre-WWII star Henry Lai Hipp/Toku Segawa/Dennis Maedo in relief.    Baer obviously ranks behind Kolten Wong on my mythic Big Island dream starting 9, with Jimmy Correa Sr./Chad Canda/Monjou Masutani in relief.     My Big Island squad consists of Wong at catcher, Kona’s Blondie Hiraishi at 1st base, Omori at 2nd base, Brandon Chaves [AAA ballstopper] at SS [backed by Stan Costales], & Bob Ota at 3rd base, with Onan Masaoka/Rich De Sa/Dopey Morita [major leaguer Brandon Villafuerte moved to California at age 7] on the mound, & the outfield claimed by Jack Ladra/Al Toody Souza/Fred Entilla Jr., spelled by highest position player pick Kean Wong  [2013 MLB high school draft choice 4th rd. #128 overall].   Aaron Ahu [Hilo High '69] played for the PCL Islanders as a local novelty face.

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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/charles-j-reid-jr/servile-before-the-throne-of-mammon_b_1897074.html?utm_hp_ref=religion

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Servile Before the Throne of Mammon

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“They sell the righteous for silver, and the needy for a pair of shoes — they trample the head of the poor into the dust of the earth, and turn aside the way of the afflicted.” –Amos 2: 6-7

So spoke the Prophet Amos about the oppression of the poor he witnessed in ancient Israel. The hostility, the hatred, the enmity of the rich for the less fortunate led Amos to curse and condemn them for their brazenness and contempt.

Catholic social thought recognizes that governments have a responsibility to address the injustice Amos denounced so vividly. To Catholics, government can never be a night-watchman state, supinely permitting a long train of abuses to be perpetrated in the name of some bloodless abstraction like free markets. It finds intolerable the very idea that government exists to serve the powerful, exalt the mighty and suck dry the substance of those without privilege or access.

Government, for Catholics, exists to serve the common good. This phrase, “the common good,” is a technical one, birthed by Aristotle, baptized by Thomas Aquinas. The common good must aim not to serve a particular faction or to benefit a particular party, but to provide justly for all members of society. Thomas Aquinas spoke of the common good as representing a just division of society’s resources among all of its members. Thomas was no soak-the-rich, Huey Long-style demagogue. But he knew that the laborer was worthy of his hire, that all members of society need education, that every human being, regardless of station in life, was entitled to dignity and respect.

In the abyssal depths of 1931, as the Western nations confronted the wrack and ruin of the Great Depression, Pope Pius XI warned of those rich who would exploit and profit from the misery of the many. Beware, he said, of those “who thought their abundant riches the result of inevitable economic laws” (Quadragesimo Anno, para. 4). Governments, this modern Amos proclaimed, must take as their “chief consideration” “the weak and the poor” (para. 25).

Now, imagine the scene in Boca Raton last May, Mitt Romney standing servile before the throne of Mammon, his host Marc Leder the very caricature of a Philistine, a man infamous even by the wild and woolly standards of hedge-fund managers. The New Year’s party he hosted last December was a “bacchanal” worthy of Nero himself, planned and appointed by his own private Tigellinus, right down to the Russian dancing girls and the flaming torches (New York Post, Dec. 29, 2011).

Standing next to this reeking Trimalchio of a host and his assembled guests, who laid down $50,000 for the honor, Romney did not uplift; he did not appeal to their better angels; he did not summon his audience to their solemn duty toward others. He did not speak as a president should. No, he sunk to the level of the crowd; he abased himself before their crudest instincts; he pandered to their cruelest stereotypes. He declared class warfare, the rich against the rest (“Mitt Romney, Class Warrior,” New York Times, Sept. 18).

“There are 47 percent of the people,” Romney ranted, “who will vote for the president no matter what. All right, there are 47 percent who are with him, who are dependent on government,” Romney continued his assault on half of the nation he pretends to want to lead. And what is the nature of this dependency? Mitt sneered: They “believe that they are entitled to health care, to food, to housing, to you-name-it.”

Mitt you are so hopelessly wrong. These are not entitlements that you can arrogantly dismiss. They are human rights. Food, shelter, health care are the common decencies any just society owes its members.

Mitt, you probably don’t know any of these people you so viciously demeaned and belittled. But let me introduce you. They are children with autism, who need sheltered settings and supportive environments. They are the handicapped and disabled, who are given dignity and self-worth through meaningful but low-paying work. They are our soldiers in combat zones, who are exempt from the income tax while serving in the line of fire. They are our working poor, who clean our streets, pick up our garbage, wait on our tables, repair our roads and bridges, and ask only for food shelter and some shred of respect. They are our elderly, our parents and grandparents, who brought the next generation into being, taught them right from wrong, guided them, nurtured them and now need to have the love they showered upon their children returned to them in kind.

They are men and women who labored long and hard in our factories until the vulture capitalists, like you, came to kill their jobs and lay them off. They are migrant workers, who plant our fields, harvest our fruits and grains, and live in gnawing fear of deportation. You have already promised to make their lives so miserable that they “self-deport.” They are our young people, who cannot afford to attend college, go into debt to pursue a rapidly vanishing American dream, and are then kicked to the curb by a dog-eat-dog economy where all wealth flows to the top.

Mitt, you want to be president, but you have chosen to wage class war on America’s voiceless and most vulnerable. Your behavior is shameless and disgraceful and in no way worthy of a great nation. Really, a better man would think about stepping down.

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http://www.forbes.com/sites/moiraforbes/2012/09/18/with-great-wealth-comes-great-responsibility/

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The next generation of inherited or self-made wealth is being scrutinized and pressured to give bigger, earlier and more efficiently than ever before. And rather than measuring success based on the number of digits connected to a bank account, many of today’s next gen philanthropists also believe that with this great wealth often comes great responsibility.

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These individuals have dedicated their lives to harnessing the venture capital mindset in order to ensure the success of their charitable giving. It’s a mindset that recognizes we can make philanthropy and charitable giving much more impactful by looking for efficiencies and, just as we do in business, seeking higher returns on investment, whether those returns be in the form of money, time, or personal fulfillment. Each spoke candidly about their successes and failures in the area of giving in ways that we can learn from our shared experiences – mitigate risks of failure – and implement a multiplier effect that will send ripples of positive impacts far beyond the initial contribution.

Kluge, Lorenz, Drayton and Arrillaga-Andreeson serve as extraordinary resources whose insights and perspectives empower each of us as philanthropists, fueling either greater success in the work we do now or hope to do in the future. The conversation is a powerful reminder that the “next generation” has opportunity, unlike any other group in a century, to make a real difference with our shared wealth. We all possess the ability to impact the world in profound and meaningful ways. We all have the ability to identify a void or a need, and then devise a product or a service to fill it.

So what defines the future of philanthropy? It’s about finding new, effective, and quantifiable ways to change the lives of people in need. It’s about finding tools that help us measure success and impact. And as these panelists exemplify, it’s about changing the world.

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http://landing.newsinc.com/forbes/video.html?vcid=23807483&freewheel=91218&sitesection=forbes

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http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/23/opinion/sunday/dowd-the-son-also-sets.html?_r=1&ref=maureendowd

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Even if voters are inclined to fire the incumbent, they need reassurance about what the replacement would do. Romney has failed to give details where needed, and when he does give details, they contradict his own past stands.

He finally released a tax return from 2011, showing he paid a higher tax rate than required. The press immediately unearthed a Romney quote from July: “If I had paid more than are legally due, I don’t think I’d be qualified to become president.” Case closed.

Aside from Mitt’s penchant for being a piñata, the campaign is a moveable feast of missteps: spending money at the wrong time; putting on biographical ads too late; letting the Obama camp define Romney before he defined himself; staging a disastrous foreign trip; fumbling the convention; and somehow neglecting to tell the candidate that there is no longer any such thing as off the record, if there ever was.

Some Republican strategists, watching it slip away, privately complain that Stevens is a poseur and political atheist who is so busy being a dilettante that he forgets the need to actually have faith.

Was the Hollywood dabbler so swept up in the idea of Clint Eastwood’s benediction that he didn’t vet the 82-year-old actor’s script, or wonder about that empty chair?

He doesn’t realize that having Romney stand for nothing and everything is not as good as having Romney say: Follow me, we’re going to go over here.

“If you don’t believe your guy can lead you to a better place,” said one G.O.P. strategist, “it’s hard to get anybody else to believe it.”

Romney said he liked to fire people. But his downfall may be that he does not.

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http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/21/opinion/krugman-disdain-for-workers.html?ref=paulkrugman

Where does this disdain for workers come from? Some of it, obviously, reflects the influence of money in politics: big-money donors, like the ones Mr. Romney was speaking to when he went off on half the nation, don’t live paycheck to paycheck. But it also reflects the extent to which the G.O.P. has been taken over by an Ayn Rand-type vision of society, in which a handful of heroic businessmen are responsible for all economic good, while the rest of us are just along for the ride.

In the eyes of those who share this vision, the wealthy deserve special treatment, and not just in the form of low taxes. They must also receive respect, indeed deference, at all times. That’s why even the slightest hint from the president that the rich might not be all that — that, say, some bankers may have behaved badly, or that even “job creators” depend on government-built infrastructure — elicits frantic cries that Mr. Obama is a socialist.

Now, such sentiments aren’t new; “Atlas Shrugged” was, after all, published in 1957. In the past, however, even Republican politicians who privately shared the elite’s contempt for the masses knew enough to keep it to themselves and managed to fake some appreciation for ordinary workers. At this point, however, the party’s contempt for the working class is apparently too complete, too pervasive to hide.

The point is that what people are now calling the Boca Moment wasn’t some trivial gaffe. It was a window into the true attitudes of what has become a party of the wealthy, by the wealthy, and for the wealthy, a party that considers the rest of us unworthy of even a pretense of respect.

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Remember when megalomanic Doc Buyers [C. Brewer] came to Dean Edmoundson’s Mr. Ed’s Bakery [formerly Ishigo Bakery] to break a $5 cash bill down to 5 single dollars????

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Doc didn’t want to tithe even a $5 bill for the neighborhood UCC church tithe plate.

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http://joelcomiskeygroup.com/articles/evangelism/KeepFIREburning.html

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The greatest danger and hindrance to effective cell ministry is apathy. It’s the apathetic attitude that comes when a culture is lifted up with wealth and security, and simply says, “I don’t have time to join a cell, enter the training track, lead a group, or for that matter, be involved in any outside activity [where my name is not emblazoned in glory].”

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give it to me,  goddess from Heaven   — Elkie Brooks,  baby!!!     —

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rpoK_elHKcg&feature=related

[see later legendary vocalist Robert Palmer as Elkie's standby compadre   --  Palmer had a myriad of health issues via substance hedonism  R.I.P.]

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Of course, my favorite genre is doo wop [1950s]  & here is my visual of appeal from the opposite sex!!       —

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7_9VjftWJBY

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but certainly my parents’ pre-WWII generation had music on the mark/right on  –  who can forget the young Nat King Cole???!!!!     —

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DtZKwp6cjd4&feature=related

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from great baseball statistics cruncher Nelson Okino born 1946 Hilo High 1964 grad    –

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Chad C. Canda, born 1/21/72, was signed as a free agent in 1991, spent a season with the Minnesota Twins rookie league team as a 19 year old, batted .253, but did not advance beyond that level. He returned to professional baseball in 1995, playing independent league ball, after being away from the game for 3 years. It would be interesting knowing why he did not continue playing professionally, e.g. released by Twins, lost interest in playing professionally, etc. and why he took another stab at it in 1995 as a 23 when the propects of being able to succeed were greatly against him.

Do you recall the names of the others we discussed as playing professional baseball and whom I had indicated that I was not aware of their being professional ball players? There was one name you mentioned whom I want to do more research, but I could have misheard the name [Lorne Rosas].

Finding out more about Chad Canda was a new piece of information for me. I thank you for bringing it to my attention as I am always looking to expand my knowledge of “local baseball” players.

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[from 3 years ago]   –

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this is my take on Brandon Chaves, born August 5, 1979, which made him a 30 year old player who finally reached the Triple A level (Durham of the International League) for 18 games this summer. He must have been a temporary fill-in player because of a shortage of players at Durham because his .198 batting average at Montgomery of the Southern League (Double A ball) earlier in the year would not have merited a promotion based on performance. However, he did hit .271 in 18 games at Durham, but I am certain that if he played more games, his batting average would have been closer to .200.

He would be categorized as an “organizational player”, someone major league organizations keep around (teams need at least eight position players in order to play games and usually there are only 4-6 players on each minor league team who would be considered “prospects” by any stretch of the imagination) because he is a dependable fill-in player who has versitility to play the infield positions, most likely plays sound fundemental baseball and is generally a good defensive player, who will not cost the organization much to retain, and who is most likely a good role model for less experienced players on the team roster. I doubt that he will be playing professional ball next year, unless it is independent league ball.

Relative to your Big Island All-Time Squad, I would think he would have to merit consideration at SS because he played professional ball, which only Stan Costales can claim at SS and Stan’s career was very short. In comparison, Chaves played 10 years in the minor leagues, which is a very long time by today’s standards. While never a very good hitter and more of a utility-type player who never got into more than 121 games (in 2003 with Lynchburg in the high Class A Carolina League) or 443 at-bats (same year and club), he also spent the last six years at Double A ball. In order to have had this kind of career, Chaves most likely was looked at favorably by a number of different organizations as he was initially in the Pittsburgh organization from 2001, then was picked up by the Cleveland Indians in 2007, and finally the Tampa Bay Rays organization this year.

If I was putting together an All-Big Island team, he would be on mine.

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