Sublime

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sublime_(philosophy)

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In aesthetics, the sublime (from the Latin sublīmis) is the quality of greatness, whether physical, moral, intellectual, metaphysical, aesthetic, spiritual or artistic. The term especially refers to a greatness beyond all possibility of calculation, measurement or imitation.   E.g. God’s Revelation. 

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“The cross of Jesus Christ is a cross of rejection and humiliation. Our Lord willingly bore this cross. But the way to that cross is often also through rejection and humiliation. But what a blessing that way is, when it leads us to the Prince of Life, to the forgiveness of sins, and to His mercy. Let us gladly seek the cross through the valley of rejection and humiliation, for this is the way our Lord came to His cross.”

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http://bible.org/seriespage/sublime-ridiculous-luke-1831-1910

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http://www.amazon.com/Rethinking-Reputation-Trumps-Marketing-Advertising/dp/023033833X/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1330393857&sr=1-2

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http://baselinescenario.com/2012/02/27/how-much-do-taxes-matter/

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Recent U.S. history shows that when you raise taxes on the rich, they don’t stop trying to make money: they just pay their lawyers and accountants more to avoid paying taxes. The solution to that is a simpler tax code with fewer exclusions and deductions.

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http://whitehouseburning.com/

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http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/02/opinion/krugman-four-fiscal-phonies.html?_r=1&ref=paulkrugman

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http://baselinescenario.com/2012/02/29/ron-pauls-budget-proposals-fiscally-irresponsible/

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http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/27/opinion/krugman-what-ails-europe.html?ref=paulkrugman

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Egotistic overpride/vanity are humanity’s most pervasive pernicious sins, and interlaced with these are envy/jealousy [that pride is an entitlement, not a luck of the draw, pleasant or unpleasant] and anger [when I don’t receive/realize such entitlement].    The cures are submission/humbleness [vs. overpride/vanity], acceptance of one’s fate [compassion/empathy vs. envy/jealousy], & obedience [patience vs. anger].   Lust/greed [arrogance] also are interlaced with overpride/vanity.

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In Latin, the word “mystery” is an invitation to solve a puzzle. If you buy a mystery novel, the goal is to turn the pages until it’s no longer a mystery. But when I say “mystery” above, I mean the Greek “musterion.” It’s not an invitation to solve; rather, to respect. It’s immutable. You only embrace through humble silence.

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http://www.lvrj.com/living/the-relief-and-comfort-of-learning-what-you-don-t-know-140473093.html

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http://www.lvrj.com/view/it-s-easy-to-ruin-a-person-s-reputation-140680453.html

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So, how do ruined people pick up and move on again toward a thriving, grateful life?   The first order of business is surrender. We stop railing against the harm.  Somewhere inside of ourselves, we make an authentic peace with the fact that no one is immune to harm. We decide to deeply believe that we waste our lives insisting every scale must be balanced before we are free.

Second, in some cases, we walk away from the fight. Yes, we give up. We acknowledge that our naysayer self-important detractor has won and move on to other work, other opportunities to give life a chance.

And lastly, we decide that no one has the power to make life anything less than good.  You might call this decision a decision of faith, even if you aren’t religious.

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Greek pathos [heart], logos [mind], & ethos [idealism/higher being] interlace with Greek eros [lust], philia [friendship], & agape [unconditional selfless love for others].

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Ethos, pathos, and logos  —

When a speaker addresses an audience, he or she must use certain modes of persuasion. Deciding how to best use ethos, pathos, and logos helps build up a speaker’s unique rhetorical stance. For example, while some speakers may focus on pathos to connect with the audience’s emotions and thus sway them, others may focus more on logos, offering data and hard facts which can convince logically-minded people, as well as help establish ethos, the sense that the speaker has authority in the subject.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhetorical_stance#Ethos.2C_pathos.2C_and_logos

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Four_Loves

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lesson plans and love‏ –

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Lesson plans filled with unsettling contempt for others scar us all.    And yet through it all,  we desire to love and to be loved beneath our scarred features.   Via sage Steven Kalas born 1957   —  from the song Purple Heart   – 

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 Love’s Purple Heart is won.

Once upon a time

You promised to believe

That wounded hearts though painful

Are the only hearts that grow.

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Yes, as pop leader Tori Amos says, step into your grace [fulfill your spiritual destiny].

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Huli’au [Hawaiian idiom for “upside down”]    gender roles  —     

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lysistrata#Discussion

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Lysistrata (/laɪˈsɪstrətə/, also /ˌlɪsəˈstrɑːtə/; Attic Greek: Λυσιστράτη, “Army-disbander”) is one of the few surviving plays written by Aristophanes. Originally performed in classical Athens in 411 BC, it is a comic account of one woman’s extraordinary mission to end The Peloponnesian War. Lysistrata persuades the women of Greece to withhold sexual privileges from their husbands and lovers as a means of forcing the men to negotiate peace — a strategy, however, that inflames the battle between the sexes. The play is notable for being an early exposé of sexual relations in a male-dominated society. The dramatic structure represents a shift away from the conventions of Old Comedy, a trend typical of the author’s career. It was produced in the same year as Thesmophoriazusae, another play with a focus on gender-based issues, just two years after Athens’ catastrophic defeat in the Sicilian Expedition.

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Discussion

As indicated below (Influence and legacy) modern adaptations of Lysistrata are often feminist and/or pacifist in their aim. The original play was neither feminist nor unreservedly pacifist. Even when they seemed to demonstrate empathy with the female condition, dramatic poets in classical Athens still reinforced sexual stereotyping of women as irrational creatures in need of protection from themselves and from others. Thus Lysistrata accepted the men’s conduct of the war out of female respect for male authority until it became obvious that there were no real men in Athens who could bring an end to the destruction and waste of young lives. She must protect women from their own worst instincts before she can accomplish her primary mission to end the war – she has to persuade them to forgo sexual activity, even binding them with an oath, and later she must rally them with an oracle when they show signs of wavering. She is an exceptional woman and by the end of the play she has demonstrated power over men also – even the leaders of Greece are submissive once caught in her magic (iuggi). Her role as an improbable savior of Athens is anticipated in The Knights, where the protagonist is an obscure sausage vendor, Agoracritus. Some points of resemblance:

  1. Lysistrata uses an oracle to manipulate women, Agoracritus uses oracles to manipulate Demos (the people);
  2. Lysistrata presents the Athenian and Spartan envoys with the beautiful Reconciliation (Diallage), Agoracritus presents Demos with the beautiful Treaties (Spondai);
  3. Lysistrata appears to have extraordinary powers (possibly magical powers), Agoracritus emerges as an agent of divine intervention, not only inspired by the gods but also able to be thought of as a god himself.

There are also some parallels between Lysistrata and two other plays written by Aristophanes on a peace theme: The Acharnians and Peace.   The allegorical figure Reconciliation, virtually a prostitute in Lysistrata, appears also in The Acharnians and her beauty is celebrated by the Chorus of old Acharnians in a song full of sexual innuendo.  In Peace, the goddess Peace is invoked as Lysimache (‘She Who Undoes Battle) and her beautiful companion, Sacred Delegation (Theoria), is offered up to the Athenian Boule as a prostitute.

The play is not an attempt to promote universal peace – Lysistrata chides the Athenian and Spartan envoys for allying themselves with barbarians. In fact the play might not even be a plea for an end to the war so much as an imaginative vision of an honourable end to the war at a time when no such ending was possible.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thesmophoriazusae#Discussion

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Thesmophoriazusae (Θεσμοφοριάζουσαι, Thesmophoriazousai; meaning Women Celebrating the Festival of the Thesmophoria, sometimes also called The Poet and the Women) is one of eleven surviving plays by the master of Old Comedy, the Athenian playwright Aristophanes. It was first produced in 411 BC, probably at the City Dionysia. How it fared in that festival’s drama competition is unknown but it is now considered one of Aristophanes’ most brilliant parodies of Athenian society, with a particular focus on the subversive role of women in a male-dominated society, the vanity of contemporary poets, such as the tragic playwrights Euripides and Agathon, and the shameless, enterprising vulgarity of an ordinary Athenian, as represented in this play by the protagonist, Mnesilochus. The play is also notable for Aristophanes’ free adaptation of key structural elements of Old Comedy and for the absence of the anti-populist and anti-war comments that pepper his earlier work. It was produced in the same year as Lysistrata, another play with a sexual theme.

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Discussion

The play is notable for its reversal of sexual stereotypes, where men dress as women and the women appear to be the equal of men, particularly in their imitation of the ecclesia or democratic assembly (in fact the herald’s opening of the women’s assembly with a paean-like cry has been taken as evidence that the ecclesia itself might have begun with a paean). However, tragic and comic poets in classical Athens reinforced sexual stereotyping even when they seemed to demonstrate empathy with the female condition and women typically were considered to be irrational creatures in need of protection from themselves and from others.   Micca’s wine-skin baby is obviously a demonstration of the irrational and subversive nature of women but so also is the female assembly – it represents a state within the Athenian state and its assumed jurisdiction over Euripides is in fact illegal. The sexual role-reversals can be understood to have a broad, political significance. The warrior ethos of an older generation versus the effete intellectualism of a younger generation is a debate or agon that recurs in various forms throughout the plays of Aristophanes. In The Frogs, for example, the agon is between Aeschylus, who values Homer for the warrior ethos he inculcates in his audience, and Euripides who values the intellectual and philosophical quibbling of a legalistic society. The agon in The Frogs is won by Aeschylus and he is brought back from the dead to reform the polis with his instructive poetry. In Thesmophoriazusae the Chorus of women makes the point that they are better than their men because they have preserved their heritage (as represented by the weaving shuttle, the wool-basket and the parasol) whereas the men have lost their spears and shields.   The loss of the shield is expressed by the Chorus metaphorically and contemptuously as ‘the parasol is thrown away’ (erriptai to skiadeion), a reference to the word ‘rhipsaspis’ (shield-thrower), a derogatory term whose use was considered in Athens to be actionable slander. Thus the message behind the sexual role-reversals in Thesmophoriazusae is not that women are equal to men but rather that the present generation of men is behaving no better than the women (the same message is delivered in Lysistrata). The stupidity of the war with Sparta, the criminal motives behind it and the desire for peace are major themes in Aristophanes’ earlier plays. There is almost no mention of The Peloponnesian War in this play yet the peace that Euripides very easily negotiates with the women at the end of the play (after all his combative schemes have failed) could be interpreted as a pro-peace message.

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On gender [sexual] dynamics, 

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http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/16/opinion/sunday/dowd-a-farewell-to-macho.html?_r=1&ref=maureendowd

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http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/on-leadership/women-and-the-trouble-with-mentors/2011/10/14/gIQAeOF7jL_story_1.html

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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/kristen-wolfe/dear-customer-who-stuck-u_b_1190690.html?utm_source=Triggermail&utm_medium=email&utm_term=Daily%20Brief&utm_campaign=daily_brief

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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/lisa-belkin/jay-z-bitch_b_1210385.html

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http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/obamas-dream-to-run-against-santorum/2012/02/24/gIQAD9VfYR_story.html

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The Virginia bill and the broader, bogus message often repeated on left-leaning talk shows that Republicans are campaigning against birth control have created a perfect storm for defeat. The math is clear: Sixty-seven percent of women are either Democrats (41 percent) or independents (26 percent); more women than men vote; 55 percent of women ages 18-22 voted in the 2008 presidential election.

Republicans are caught in a nearly impossible situation, none more than the more temperate-minded Mitt Romney. It is important to remember, however, why contraception came up in the first place. Republicans were forced to man their battlements by the Obama administration’s new health-care rule requiring that Catholic organizations pay for contraception in violation of conscience. From there, things spiraled out of the realm of religious liberty, where this debate belongs, and into the fray of moral differences.

Santorum’s original surge was based not on social issues but on his authenticity and his ability to identify with middle-class struggles. He was the un-Romney. But now this appealing profile has been occluded by social positions that make him an outlier to mainstream Americans.

Republicans may sleep better if they nominate The Most Conservative Person In The World, but they won’t be seeing the executive branch anytime soon. It’s too bad this election season got lost in the weeds of religious conviction. It wouldn’t have happened if the Obama administration had simply taken one of several other routes available for providing birth control to women who want it. Instead, Obama aimed right at the heart of the Republican Party and, one can only assume, got exactly what he wanted: a culture war in which Rick Santorum would be the natural point man and, in the broader public’s perception, the voice of the GOP.

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Class consciousness underlies ethnic/sectarian conflicts.   Class as divisive  –       

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Importance_of_Being_Earnest#As_a_satire_of_society

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As a satire of society

The play repeatedly mocks Victorian mores and social customs, marriage and the pursuit of love in particular.  In Victorian times earnestness was considered to be the over-riding societal value, originating in religious attempts to reform the lower classes, it spread to the upper ones too throughout the century. The play’s very title, with its mocking paradox [serious people are so because they do not see trivial comedies] introduces the theme, it continues in the drawing room discussion, “Yes, but you must be serious about it. I hate people who are not serious about meals. It is so shallow of them” says Algernon in Act 1; allusions are quick and from multiple angles. Wilde embodied society’s rules and rituals artfully into Lady Bracknell: minute attention to the details of her style created a comic effect of assertion by restraint.  In contrast to her encyclopaedic knowledge of the social distinctions of London’s street names, Jack’s obscure parentage is subtly evoked. He defends himself against her “A handbag?” with the clarification, “The Brighton Line.”  At the time, Victoria Station consisted of two separate but adjacent terminal stations sharing the same name. To the east was the ramshackle LC&D Railway, on the west the up-market LB&SCR—the Brighton Line, which went to Worthing, the fashionable, expensive town the gentleman who found baby Jack was travelling to at the time [and after which Jack was named].

Wilde managed both to engage with and to mock the genre. The men follow traditional matrimonial rites, but the foibles they excuse are ridiculous, and the farce is built on an absurd confusion of a book and a baby. In turn, both Gwendolen and Cecily have the ideal of marrying a man named Ernest, a popular and respected name at the time, and they indignantly declare that they have been deceived when they find out the men’s real names. When Jack apologizes to Gwendolen during his marriage proposal it is for not being wicked:

JACK: Gwendolen, it is a terrible thing for a man to find out suddenly that all his life he has been speaking nothing but the truth. Can you forgive me? GWENDOLEN: I can. For I feel that you are sure to change.

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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/01/11/pew-survey-class-conflict_n_1200176.html?ref=daily-brief?utm_source=DailyBrief&utm_campaign=011212&utm_medium=email&utm_content=NewsEntry&utm_term=Daily%20Brief

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gassed out/fuel prices    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/robert-reich/price-of-oil_b_1290409.html?ref=daily-brief?utm_source=DailyBrief&utm_campaign=022112&utm_medium=email&utm_content=BlogEntry&utm_term=Daily%20Brief

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http://baselinescenario.com/2012/02/23/why-wont-the-federal-reserve-board-talk-to-financial-reform-advocates/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+BaselineScenario+%28The+Baseline+Scenario%29

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“I would like to grow old in a thriving love affair.”      — from great sage & loving person Steven Kalas
 
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Hi Steven: Curt from Hawai’i here. I’m heterosexual. I apologize in advance for intruding on you.
 
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I posted my thoughts on loss/absence of a soulmate in my blog.   I don’t know if this helps, but “what the heck,” right??   Thanks, Steven, for your utterly fulfilling interchanges of wisdom and thoughts!!    Hau’oli Makahiki Hou!!  [Happy New Year]
 
 
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In an “over on its head”  reversal of convention, maybe Heavenly Father constructs “memorials” of loss/goodbye/grief  for me to appreciate as mileposts in life’s walk in Faith.   That no matter the “huli ‘au” upside down nature of the death of possibilities/hopes/dreams/relationships, each experience is a learning odyssey [learning life enrichment/wisdom-clarity make the relationship worth its while],  from which hope still springs eternal,  so to speak.   That love never dies, no matter the external circumstance.   That to love and to be loved are life’s precious rewards, no matter the risk of loss/harm/disrepute.   Love suffuses thru us all.   The power of love.   The unalterable word  –  not “If,” but “Will,” in Love.

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deprived of love, maybe one appreciates love more if and when the wholeness of love comes [metaphorically restore homeostasis]  –

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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/andrew-weil-md/hormesis_b_1214355.html?ref=daily-brief?utm_source=DailyBrief&utm_campaign=012012&utm_medium=email&utm_content=BlogEntry&utm_term=Daily%20Brief

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My great hero & vocalist Mariska Veres 1947-2006 always evoked passion & love.   Go to seconds 49-55 on this You Tube video [time sequence is at the bottom of the video] & experience thriving & climactic  love!!

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WTb1LYaFV8I

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Baby, I’m yours!               http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y8m0Tp97eOw

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Deliriously demented!       😉  

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y6SlK9uHTc8&feature=related

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VdCTmqvaf2s&feature=related

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from compassionate Carol Ludloff Arnold  –

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Mahalo for sharing all these wonderful thought-provoking missives –  have a wonderful New Year!

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http://www.lvrj.com/living/gestalt-therapy-can-open-doors-to-more-authentic-life-118731604.html

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Gestalt [form — the whole is other than the sum of its parts] is a spontaneous moment wherein the whole of a human being is radically open and present to the wholeness of a life experience.

We can’t decide to open a gestalt.  It happens apart from our will. It’s not a choice; rather, a happening.  An in-breaking.  Gestalts bend time and space.  At once do gestalts frighten and fascinate.

Falling in love is a gestalt. Acute grief is a gestalt. Profound awe is a gestalt. Comedy can open a gestalt. The wonder of nature. Authentic joy. Physical suffering. Religious experience. Terror. Great art form — music, dance, sculpture, paintings. Intense anger. Sex is a gestalt. Passionate oratory can open a gestalt, in individuals or sometimes entire nations, for better or worse (see the public addresses of Adolph Hitler).

The ability to be radically open to the wholeness of the human experience has rich benefits. An open gestalt can generate vitality and more personal freedom. It invites greater authenticity.

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My biggest hero is Viktor Frankl, Holocaust survivor, who intones that everything can be taken from a person but one thing:  The last of the human freedoms—to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, as when Viktor faced down the insanity/madness of Hitler’s death squads.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Logotherapy#Discovering_meaning

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Logotherapy was developed by neurologist and psychiatrist Viktor Frankl. It is considered the “Third Viennese School of Psychotherapy” after Freud’s psychoanalysis and Adler’s individual psychology.   It is a type of existentialist analysis which  focuses on a will to meaning as opposed to Adler’s Nietzschean doctrine of will to power or Freud’s will to pleasure.  Rather than power or pleasure, logotherapy is founded upon the belief that it is the striving to find a meaning in one’s life that is the primary most powerful motivating and driving force in humans.   A short introduction to this paradigm is given in Frankl’s most famous book, Man’s Search for Meaning,  in which he outlines how his theories helped him to survive his Holocaust experience and how that experience further developed and reinforced his theories.

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Basic principles

The notion of Logotherapy was created with the Greek word logos [“meaning”].   Frankl’s concept is based on the premise that the primary motivational force of an individual is to find  meaning in life. The following list of tenets represents basic principles of logotherapy:

  • Life has meaning under all circumstances, even the most miserable ones.
  • Our main motivation for living is our will to find meaning in life.
  • We have freedom to find meaning in what we do, and what we experience, or at least in the stand we take when faced with a situation of unchangeable suffering.

The human spirit is referred to in several of the assumptions of logotherapy, but the use of the term spirit is not “spiritual” or “religious.”   In Frankl’s view, the spirit is the will of the human being.   The emphasis, therefore, is on the search for meaning, which is not necessarily the search for God or any other supernatural being.   Frankl also noted the barriers to humanity’s quest for meaning in life.   He warns against “…affluence, hedonism, [and] materialism…” in the search for meaning.

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Discovering meaning

According to Frankl, “We can discover this meaning in life in three different ways:  (1) by creating a work or doing a deed;  (2) by experiencing something or encountering someone; and (3) by the attitude we take toward unavoidable suffering,”  and that “everything can be taken from a person but one thing:   The last of the human freedoms—to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances.”   On the meaning of suffering, Frankl gives the following example:

Once, an elderly general practitioner consulted me because of his severe depression. He could not overcome the loss of his wife who had died two years before and whom he had loved above all else. Now how could I help him? What should I tell him? I refrained from telling him anything, but instead confronted him with a question, “What would have happened, Doctor, if you had died first, and your wife would have had to survive you?” “Oh,” he said, “for her this would have been terrible; how she would have suffered!” Whereupon I replied, “You see, Doctor, such a suffering has been spared her, and it is you who have spared her this suffering; but now, you have to pay for it by surviving and mourning her.” He said no word but shook my hand and calmly left the office.
— Viktor Frankl
 
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Frankl emphasized that realizing the value of suffering is meaningful only when the first two creative possibilities are not available (for example, in a concentration camp) and only when such suffering is inevitable – he was not proposing that people suffer unnecessarily.

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Philosophical basis of Logotherapy

Frankl described the metaclinical implications of logotherapy in his book The Will of Meaning: Foundations and Applications of Logotherapy.  He believed that there is no psychotherapy apart from the theory of man. As an existential psychologist, he inherently disagreed with the “machine model,”  as it undermines the human quality of humans.   As a neurologist and psychiatrist, Frankl developed a unique view of determinism to coexist with the three basic pillars of logotherapy [the freedom of will].   Though Frankl admitted that man can never be free from every condition, such as, biological, sociological, or psychological determinants, based on his experience in the Holocaust, he believed that man is “capable of resisting and braving even the worst conditions.”   In doing such, man can detach from situations, himself, choose an attitude about himself, determine his own determinants, thus shaping his own character and becoming responsible for himself.

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After the death of Frankl’s wife and Frankl’s parents and brother during the Holocaust, he used religion to cope with their deaths, affirming his beliefs in God or a higher meaning.   Frankl recognized that his logotherapy ultimately led to meaning through faith.

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Word play:   “for the sake of ” is the opposite of “forsaken”   –  The Wordbook dictionary states that “forsake” is derived from an Old English word “forsacan.”    “for” means “completely” and “sacan” means “deny.

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Word play:   “Hope against hope” is a contradiction but has Biblical roots  –

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http://bible.cc/romans/4-18.htm

Who against hope believed in hope,…. Abraham believed the promise of God,

that he might become the father of many nations, being assisted by a supernatural aid: “in hope”; of the fulfilment of it by the grace and power of God:    “against hope”: against all visible, rational grounds of hope.

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Stephen Leacock typifies “irony,” subtler art than satire, the deeper wisdom.  Leacock infantly vulnerable, who accepted his own contradictions [sinned sentient] w/out strenuously trying to reconcile them, per Robertson Davies.  Amid Leacock’s humanity/foibles, Leacock radiated beauty.  He chose to love over to fear.    Need I mutter exemplar ergo impossible irony???  — Patton’s feared foe Rommel orders dossier on Patton — Rommel’s aide spills nonsense [schooling/creds/awards] – Rommel exclaims, “The Man — who is Patton!!??”  Aide meekly recounts, “Well, Patton swears all the time — but he prays to God at night.”   Rommel convulses, “Oh my God, such a conflicted man!!  He has nothing to lose!!  I must destroy Patton before he destroys me!!”    Macho males would revulse at a prayin’ man, dismissing a prayin’ man as a pussy/panty-arse.   Not so amid the deepest unction of irony!!   As to “turn the other cheek” & “when you give, it is given to you???”  
 
 
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Understandable sentient self-lamentation of Earl Dean Edmoundson born 1945   —
 
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Biblical pundit Earl Dean Edmoundson of Honomu [former Ishigo Bakery] painted for free his brethren’s church in Puna — didn’t even get a common courtesy thank you from its pastor — and subsequently Dean fumed and steamed for a week over such idiotic disregard of Dean’s “giving”  — well, as Jesus would have it, Dean’s wife June [the strength in the household] comforted Dean & intoned that God works in mysterious ways  — “turn the other cheek” by forgiving the so-called insolent pastor, and Dean’s “giving” is not in vain because Jesus rejoices at Dean’s unction/giving spirit, as do the Puna congregation members [Dean is a head deacon at the Honomu Living Waters Church 40 miles northbound]  — and as June so lovingly evokes, maybe God meant for Dean not to get a thank you from the Puna pastor — to test Dean’s strength of belief in God — that when you give, don’t “be of this world,” i.e,. the blessing is that you give for your love of God, not to get a thank you “of this earth.”   And maybe, even maybe, the Puna pastor tested Dean’s strength by looking “to see”  if Dean would end up sore & hurt incessantly.   Maybe?!   Only God knows.   Children of God — innocent in Jesus’ eyes.    See how irony cuts “right to the chase,” so to speak??
 
 
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 Reprise 1 Corinthians 1:26-27  —  Remember, dear brothers and sisters, that few of you were wise in the world’s eyes or powerful or wealthy when God called you.   Instead, God chose things the world considers foolish in order to shame those who think they are wise.   And He chose things that are powerless to shame those who are powerful, so the same God chose those who reside in the forsaken social margins.   In Dean Edmoundson’s case, those who reside in the forsaken social margins in Puna might benefit from Dean’s painting of their church!  
 
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Second Timothy 1:7,   “For God has not given us the Spirit of fear; but of power, and of love, and of a sound mind.”
 
 
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The power of  love  –   a decade  anniversary of a truly great movie –

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A.I._Artificial_Intelligence

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In 2104, global warming has led to melting polar ice caps, flooded coastlines and a drastic reduction of the human population. There is a new class of robots called mechas, advanced humanoids capable of emulating thoughts and emotions. David (Haley Joel Osment), a prototype model created by Cybertronics, is designed to resemble a human child and to display love for its human owners. They test their creation with one of their employees, Henry Swinton (Sam Robards), and his wife Monica (Frances O’Connor). The Swintons’ son, Martin (Jake Thomas), was placed in suspended animation until a cure can be found for his rare disease. Although Monica is initially frightened of David, she eventually warms to him after activating his imprinting protocol, which irreversibly causes David to project love for her, the same as any child would love a parent. He is also befriended by Teddy (Jack Angel), a robotic teddy bear, who takes it upon himself to care for David’s well being.

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A cure is found for Martin and he is brought home; a sibling rivalry ensues between Martin and David. Martin convinces David to go to Monica in the middle of the night and cut off a lock of her hair, but the parents wake up and are very upset. At a pool party, one of Martin’s friends activates David’s self-protection programming by poking him with a knife. David clings to Martin and they both fall into the pool, where heavy David sinks to the bottom while still clinging to Martin. Martin is saved from drowning, but Henry in particular is shocked by David’s actions. Henry persuades Monica to return David to Cybertronics, where David will be destroyed. However, on the way Monica decides to abandon David in the forest (alongside Teddy) to hide as an unregistered mecha instead of being destroyed. David is captured for an anti-mecha Flesh Fair, an event where obsolete mechas are destroyed in front of cheering crowds. David is nearly killed, but the crowd is swayed by his realistic nature (David, unlike other mechas, pleads for his life) and he escapes, along with Gigolo Joe (Jude Law), a male prostitute mecha on the run after being framed for murder.

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The two set out to find the Blue Fairy, whom David remembers from the story The Adventures of Pinocchio. He is convinced that the Blue Fairy will transform him into a human boy, allowing Monica to love him and take him home. Joe and David make their way to Rouge City. Information from a holographic answer engine called “Dr. Know” (Robin Williams) eventually leads them to the top of the Rockefeller Center in the flooded ruins of Manhattan. They use a flying submersible vehicle called an amphibicopter they stole from police, who are still chasing Joe. David meets his human creator, Professor Hobby (William Hurt), who excitedly tells David that finding him was a test, which has demonstrated the reality of his love and desire. It also becomes clear that many copies of David are already being manufactured, along with female versions. David sadly realizes he is not unique. A disheartened David attempts to commit suicide by falling from a ledge into the ocean, but Joe rescues him with the amphibicopter. David tells Joe he saw the Blue Fairy underwater, and wants to go down to her. At that moment, Joe is captured by the authorities with the use of an electromagnet. David and Teddy take the amphibicopter to the fairy, which turns out to be a statue from a submerged attraction at Coney Island. Teddy and David become trapped when the Wonder Wheel falls on their vehicle. Believing the Blue Fairy to be real, David asks to be turned into a real boy, repeating his wish without end, until the ocean freezes and his internal power source drains away.

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2,000 years later, humans are extinct and Manhattan is buried under several hundred feet of sea ice.  Mechas have evolved into a highly advanced alien-looking humanoid form. They find David and Teddy and discover they are functional mechas who knew living humans, making them special and unique. David is revived and walks to the frozen Blue Fairy statue, which cracks and collapses as he touches it. Having received and comprehended his memories, the advanced mechas use them to reconstruct the Swinton home and explain to David via an interactive image of the Blue Fairy (Meryl Streep) that it is not possible to make him human. However, at David’s insistence, they recreate Monica from DNA in the lock of her hair which had been saved by Teddy. Unfortunately, she can only live for a single day and the process cannot be repeated. David spends the happiest day of his life with Monica and Teddy, and Monica tells David that she loves him and has always loved him as she drifts to sleep for the final time. David lies down next to her, closes his eyes and goes “to that place where dreams are born.”

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g7MRjbAatv4&feature=related

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A 12-year-old Mongolian boy- Uudam (乌达木 Wudamu in Chinese) who lost his parents at the age of 8 in a road accident singing the song-”Mother in the Dream” (梦中的额吉) to his mother in heaven. He seldom talks about his story but when he misses his mother, he will sing this song. Besides, he always dream about his mother, sitting beside him.

The song is in Mongolian, therefore, not everyone can understand the lyrics. However, his singing touched every judge and the audience in the hall without the understanding of the lyrics. He sang out all his love and thoughts to his mother.

A touching song, performed by a boy who got a sad story behind, a voice comes from far Mongolia sending his thoughts to his mother in heaven. A great performance by a 12-year-old boy! He got an interesting and beautiful dream which is to invent a kind of ink that just needs a drop to drop on the ground, the whole world will cover with green grass. one more thing to add, his mother wished to see his singing on the stage when she was alive.

the translation of lyrics as below:

In the stillness among the vast lands I dream of Mother praying for me She looks afar and gives precious milk to the heavens As offering for my well-being My Mother, so far away. Stars twinkle above the grasslands while In my dream I see Mother’s caring face As she prays to the heavens to wish me godspeed My Mother, so far away.

In my dream I see Home basking in golden sunbeam While Mother softly sings an enchanting melody There in the grasslands lies my everlasting home My dearest Mother, wait for my return. My dearest Mother, wait for my return.

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also,  …  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Elephant_Man_(film)

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 That night, back at the hospital, Merrick thanks Treves for all he has done and finishes his model of the nearby church. Imitating one of his sketches on the wall—a sleeping child—he removes the pillows that have allowed him to sleep in an upright position, lies down on his bed and dies, consoled by a vision of his mother, Mary Jane Merrick, quoting Alfred Lord Tennyson‘s “Nothing will Die.”

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Nothing Will Die

by Alfred Lord Tennyson

When will the stream be aweary of flowing Under my eye? When will the wind be aweary of blowing Over the sky? When will the clouds be aweary of fleeting? When will the heart be aweary of beating? And nature die? Never, oh! never, nothing will die; The stream flows, The wind blows, The cloud fleets, The heart beats, Nothing will die.

Nothing will die; All things will change Thro’ eternity. ‘Tis the world’s winter; Autumn and summer Are gone long ago; Earth is dry to the centre, But spring, a new comer, A spring rich and strange, Shall make the winds blow Round and round, Thro’ and thro’, Here and there, Till the air And the ground Shall be fill’d with life anew.

The world was never made; It will change, but it will not fade. So let the wind range; For even and morn Ever will be Thro’ eternity. Nothing was born; Nothing will die; All things will change.

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from sweetheart Carol Ludloff Arnold   –  Thank you for sharing–truly interesting!

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from sage Steven Kalas   –

 
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The National Enquirer says, “For inquiring minds.” But they mean prurient minds, and in some cases sadistic curiosity.
 

I mean that, once the unlovely story is told, I find that I don’t keep track of the unlovely story. When, by chance, I should cross paths with former acquaintances years later, I’m not focused on the mistakes and failures. I often don’t remember them. What I celebrate is the courageous way patients have embraced those unlovely events and turned them into redemption, humility, creativity, gratitude, and commitments to live with integrity and meaning.

You don’t have to be a counselor or a priest to accept a pilgrim’s entrustment of some personal darkness or gaping vulnerability. Real friends do this. Loving family does this. It is our honor to guard these treasures, and take them quietly to our graves.

Think about the people who have and are faithfully guarding your treasures, and be grateful.

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http://www.lvrj.com/living/confidentiality-helps-create-sacred-space-of-trust-139177164.html

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wonderful scribe Kathleen Parker on humility amid pain of loss   –

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We’ve seen it again and again in concession and farewell speeches. Al Gore was never more splendid than when he conceded to George W. Bush in 2000. The pain and humility of that moment were palpable, and even Gore’s critics couldn’t help but be struck by the power of his grace. Where had that man been?

Ditto John Kerry. And, now, ditto Romney. The moral of the story isn’t that one must lose to win, but that one try to harness the spoils of loss for the road to victory. Those spoils are humility, grace and the freedom to be one’s true self.

In real life, Romney cares about the very poor and spent his missionary years trying to help the less fortunate. To those who know him, he is kind, generous and humble. If Romney could summon the man he is in his quiet time, unhaunted by the cliches of political wizardry, Americans might find that they like him after all.

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http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/mitt-romney-and-the-freedom-of-loser-ness/2012/02/10/gIQAIHh34Q_story.html

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radically open to love and to be loved — from sage Steven Kalas born 1957  –

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Or you learn that, in love and respect, your passionate differences become a begrudging respect that strengthens the bond of your relationship.

We don’t get to decide when we fall in love. Or with whom. And falling in love has a way of further honing your list of non-negotiables. Specifically, it distinguishes between what truly can’t be negotiated (infidelity, domestic violence) and what was just posturing on your list as arrogance and ego-defense.

Take a long look at your life partner. Give thanks for those attributes that, had you been in charge of the universe, you would never have looked for, desired or chosen. Instead, love chose you and said, “Surprise!”

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1 Corinthians 1:26-27  —  Remember, dear   brothers and sisters, that few of you were wise in the world’s eyes or   powerful or wealthy when God called you.   Instead, God chose things   the world considers foolish in order to shame those who think they are   wise.   And He chose things that are powerless to shame those who   are powerful, so the same God chose those who reside in the forsaken social   margins.

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1 Corinthians 2:6

–Be not of this world–   [be of the spiritual   dimension, with comfort & solace & companionship with thy   Lord]

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Mikeki’s higher truths [the spiritual/metaphysical plane] are  1)  Mikeki’s irrepressible courage      2)  Mikeki’s utterly clean heart     3)   Mikeki’s prophecy [gift of the spirit from Heavenly Father to her].    Clearly, absent courage — nothing else matters.   But the rarest truth is Mikeki’s gift of prophecy [sixth sense/”intuition”].    Mikeki’s earthly talents are  1)  Mikeki’s open nature [open-minded ]    2)  Mikeki’s entrepreneurial backdrop [fiscal responsibility hand in hand with the Social Gospel]    3)  Mikeki’s keen powers of observation/anticipation.  

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Art [a higher truth like prophecy] consists of  1) inner strength/voice     2) mystery     3) humor  [humor is the rarest art].   Sage Steven Kalas born 1957 intones that the ability to be radically open to the wholeness of the human experience has rich benefits.   An open gestalt [full form] can generate vitality and more personal freedom. It invites greater authenticity.    Respecting the value of being human includes noticing the absurdity of being human.     Ironic, especially when you consider that no one comes to question life who isn’t suffering.   Which is why irony is the subtler, deeper art, vs. satire.   But, seen another way, humor is an ally for those who suffer.   When humor is therapeutic and a positive completion, it opens a chain of wonderful possibilities.   Humor, at once, creates a space of psychological safety and it evokes vulnerability.   This is important, because we all come to terms/points in our lives to explore great vulnerabilities, but great vulnerabilities are more likely to emerge freely and undamaged in the safety humor provides.   Said clinically, humor opens a gestalt. It cranks us open.

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Humor as therapy makes unhelpful psychological defenses less necessary.   It creates a “spontaneous honesty” that often surprises us all.   There’s a sense of “Wow … did I just say that?”    Yep, you did.   And it was pretty funny.   Because it was true.    Humor coaxes a liberating humility.   Amusing self-deprecation is a terrific antidote for murderous self-loathing. A happy human being laughs often and easy at him/herself. There is something so freeing about noticing that we are ridiculous.    Contradicted. Conflicted.     Humor provides a way to effectively manage ambivalence. Used with intention, humor can creatively ventilate the mixed feelings that all of us have about important, close relationships in our lives.    Humor can turn ambivalence into playfulness/delightfulness between ourselves and those we love, making it less likely that the ambivalence becomes passive-aggressive, or actually hostile and aggressive.

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Humor is Truth.    Over and over again.   If you’re laughing about it, it’s nearly certain that you’ve got your finger on something real and authentic about you.

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Once we are “cranked open” by humor, we have a better chance at reconstructing the way we see ourselves, others and circumstances. We have more choices.    Humor brings a needed perspective to the unflagging persistence of selfhood before us.

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Yes, Stephen Hawking & atheists correctly say that we have only one chance  — our mortal lives — to make a difference for the better for all living things.   Correctly make the best of it.   

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And that if we happen to be martyrs/exemplars [e.g. Holocaust victims] for the good side of humanity by being disincentives to human barbarism/savagery, at least we take comfort in manifesting the olive branch to avert recurrence of the evil/indifference/selfishness inherent in us all  [olive branch being blessed creation of God’s State of Israel].  

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Life also is a challenge regardless of our evil human condition  –  nature’s calamities beset us all on this earth  — so that Hawking & atheists correctly say to minimize the risks of injury/death via our inherent good cognition and to tough it out as best as we can.    Such risks are facts of life, so to speak.   

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I like my alltime hero Steven Kalas’ soothing thoughts  [God as our omnipotent Savior] – 

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Mercy is a sublime human virtue. Becoming human means putting a bridle on the animal instinct to attack vulnerability. It means that, when our antagonist has dropped his sword and shield, bows before us and asks for another chance, we give a “thumbs up.” We allow sincere remorse to gentle us instead of provoke us to increased aggression.

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In the Hebrew creation myth, Adam and Eve disobey God and realize, much to their humiliation, that they are naked. They cover their nakedness with itchy, coarse fig leaves and then hide from God in a tree. They are ridiculous. God shows up. And, yes, there are consequences for the disobedience. Difficult consequences. But even the consequences are wrapped in mercy. The last thing God does is give Adam and Eve soft animal skins to wear. In compassion, He lets them cover their nakedness. He probably even averts his eyes while they are changing out of their fig leaves. That was nice of God.   

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http://www.lvrj.com/living/by-accepting-i-m-sorry-we-show-our-sublime-humanity-136899918.html

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person of  remarkable cognition & composure Nani Kyota  –

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Aloha Curtis,
 
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I agree that we should make the most of this life.   Some believe in reincarnation,  but I would hope that if this were true I would be able to accomplish what God intended me to do the first time so that I wouldn’t have to stretch it out to  a delayed completion.     Others believe that we have the opportunity to be Gods ourselves [Imago Dei] and create our own worlds.
 
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I don’t remember ever taking joy in the suffering of others even as a teenager [redemptive suffering means to empathize/have compassion for another who suffers, perhaps even accepting such suffering to alleviate/lighten that person’s burden/load], even when there were people who had made me suffer [pain is real and not enjoyable].    It just doesn’t make any sense to me.   I’m not sure that I would want to be a God and watch all the the heartbreaking behavior that goes on in the world.   Besides, being the oldest of 10 children, I started being a mother by the time my sister Becky was born and & I was only 2 1/2 at that time but she was instantly mine.
 
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I’m not saying that I am perfect or even close.    I work daily on controlling my anger.   I have had to work on road rage but the only time that I let people hear what I say is when I see someone throw rubbish out of their car and then I have been known to lose control and yell out my window at the person.   They probably still can’t hear me.   I don’t do that anymore. OR try not to!   Now that my daughter is driving I try to be a better example.   I don’t want to pass on the insanity.

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I would love to be an angel and spread love and comfort to all those in need.   I don’t want to be a God myself.   I will take whatever job that comes my way.    All I want is to be able to live with God and my family throughout eternity.

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I am so very grateful to have the knowledge of eternity and for the many blessings that it affords.    My goal this year & forever more is to be grateful in each and every situation that comes my way and hopefully be an example and an inspiration to others to do the same.

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God bless you my friend,

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Nani

 

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Nani’s response above is to this thought   –

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Yes, Stephen Hawking & atheists correctly say that we have only one chance  — our mortal lives — to make a difference for the better for all living things.   Correctly make the best of it.   

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And that if we happen to be martyrs/exemplars [e.g. Holocaust victims & creation of State/Nation of Israel] for the good side of humanity by being disincentives to human barbarism/savagery, at least we take comfort in manifesting the olive branch to avert recurrence of the evil/indifference/selfishness inherent in us all.  

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Life also is a challenge regardless of our evil human condition  –  nature’s calamities beset us all on this earth  — so that Hawking & atheists correctly say to minimize the risks of injury/death via our inherent good cognition and to tough it out as best as we can.    Such risks are facts of life, so to speak.   

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Redemptive suffering means to grace/forgive a plight/fate/person for your self-sufferance which averts another person from suffering, typified by Scripture’s Hath No Greater Love than to Lay Down One’s Life for Another. John 15:13

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Traditional Catholicism’s redemptive suffering about punishment and more punishment wholly is off the mark. This is the Vatican’s spool to rope you in for indulgences/money. Its golden rule is whoever has the gold rules, straight from our Pontiff’s pulpit.

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Dostoevsky dives into the dual nature of suffering — orthodox Catholic punishment, and Dostoevsky’s Sonya as the whore/saint who suffers because of and for others, and thus becomes most Christ-like as Sonya Grows in His Holiness, no matter her social standing/economic status on our mortal plane.

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Magnanimous Viktor Frankl’s exemplar of the old man who finally realizes that his suffering the loss of his lifelong dearest companion wife allows her not to suffer if her husband had died before her — releases this husband from his misery and pain of losing his wife. He suffers because of and for his departed wife, and such suffering finally is accepted with tremendous equanimity by the heretofore tormented husband.     Redemptive suffering.

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And as with extraordinary sage Steven Kalas’ example about his biological father who gave up Steven born 1957 and his older sister for adoption to Steven’s biological mother and her new husband when Steven was just one year old, to afford Steven and his sister a better life with Steven’s biological mother & adoptive father — at which time Steven’s biological dad chose a vasectomy — THIS WAS THE HIGHER/DEEPER TRUTH!! It broke dad’s heart to lose his children. And so he made certain he never would be a father again. The Ultimate Disguised Blessing is that Steven’s biological dad’s vasectomy exemplified/suffused of redemptive suffering a la Dostoevsky’s Sonya/Frankl’s exemplar of the old man.

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So if you have a choice between redemption/forgiveness and bitterness, choose redemption, no matter how difficult emotionally it is.

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Just the same, cogent Nani evokes of Biblical David, that David lamented incessantly over the death of his infant son, interceding/ interposing that David desired that David’s life end so that his infant son lives, to no avail. But voila! As suddenly as death came, so suddenly did God expiate/purge David of David’s guilt/remorse, God allowing Grace upon David, so that David was able to forgive himself. Of course, God had much greater plans for David, such that among our most auspicious passages in Scripture is God reposing in, “Look at David, he’s after God’s [My] Heart!! 1 Samuel 14 [A Man After My Own Heart]

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If ever you have the choice between redemption and bitterness, shower rainbows of redemption. Love never ends, here or in the afterlife. For now and for always, with love –Curt

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To address the question of redemptive suffering,  here is great teacher Viktor Frankl,  Holocaust survivor and the genesis of the pschotherapy/philosophical school of  “The Will to Meaning in Life.”   –
 
 
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According to Frankl, “We can discover this meaning in life in three different ways:  (1) by creating a work or doing a deed;  (2) by experiencing something or encountering someone; and (3) by the attitude we take toward unavoidable suffering,”  and that “everything can be taken from a person but one thing:   The last of the human freedoms—to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances.”   On the meaning of suffering, Frankl gives the following example:

Once, an elderly general practitioner consulted me because of his severe depression. He could not overcome the loss of his wife who had died two years before and whom he had loved above all else. Now how could I help him? What should I tell him? I refrained from telling him anything, but instead confronted him with a question, “What would have happened, Doctor, if you had died first, and your wife would have had to survive you?” “Oh,” he said, “for her this would have been terrible; how she would have suffered!” Whereupon I replied, “You see, Doctor, such a suffering has been spared her, and it is you who have spared her this suffering; but now, you have to pay for it by surviving and mourning her.” He said no word but shook my hand and calmly left the office.
— Viktor Frankl
 
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Frankl emphasized that realizing the value of suffering is meaningful only when the first two creative possibilities are not available [for example, in a concentration camp] and only when such suffering is inevitable – he was not proposing that people suffer unnecessarily.

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And on redemptive suffering as Irony, note the understandable sentient self-lamentation of Earl Dean Edmoundson born 1945  above.

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Erudite Nani Kyota has said something really revelatory and significant, as Nani’s unconscious has made a connection with the deeper emotional reality evident in us all.    Suffering is not about pain, but about the freedom to choose emerging meaning and hope.
 
 
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“Suffering” [noun] is not explained in our deepest spiritual wellsprings.   It simply is acknowledged a priori.   Jesus doesn’t say “pick up my cross and follow me.”   Jesus says “pick up YOUR cross and follow me.”   Suffering is of THIS world.   To deal with suffering is to deal with loss, the death of possibilities/hopes/dreams, the pain in our souls, so to speak, though our myriad cultural languages do not speak of pain per se, but of profound loss —  and the freedom to choose how and to what extent we deal with suffering.
 
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Transformative suffering refers to a conscious encounter with loss anchored by the hope of emerging meaning and human transformation, especially in our hearts of ANOTHER world/realm.     
 
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Let the mystery of suffering be the mystery, as extraordinary sage Steven Kalas born 1957 intones.
 
 
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Our temptation is to reduce the suffering to something less chaotic and more intellectually manageable.   “There must be a reason,” we protest. And so we construct reasons. Often the reasons make us even more miserable.
 
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Share the suffering. The opportunity to tell the story of our suffering to a compassionate and skillful listener is helpful beyond measure. Simply in the telling and retelling, we begin to shift perspective, to put a healing distance between us and the pain.
 
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Turn to the wisdom of symbol and ritual. Medals of honor, funerals, statues and monuments, ritual mourning, legacy, keepsakes — we are symbolic creatures, and our symbols help us to embrace and transcend our suffering.
 
 
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Discover redemptive mission. Many people discover meaning in suffering as they work to redeem their suffering in service to the world. And so the alcoholic becomes an AA sponsor. The mother whose child is killed by a drunken driver becomes an activist with Mothers Against Drunk Driving. The mercenary becomes a naturalist. The victim of child abuse becomes a marriage and family counselor. And so it goes.
 
 
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Turn suffering to witness. Sometimes we suffer as a testimony against injustice. We decide to suffer as a way of absorbing the cost of hatred and bearing witness against the insanity of revenge. Or sometimes we willingly suffer for the sake of endurance alone. That is, as a witness to the goodness of life.
 
 
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Suffering as a fact of life embraces an intention and willingness to be radically open and present to life as life is — joyous or sorrowful, delightful or painful.

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http://www.lvrj.com/living/lifes-journey-includes-pain-of-suffering-69506497.html

 

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from magnanimous Carol Ludloff Arnold  –   Thanks as always, for these beautiful recollections,  as wonderful Nani Kyota shares here [above]!!

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Don’t you have something to offer in terms of your own life experiences akin to Jesus’ Parable/Pericope  [reversal of convention/a confounding Truth which reveals a disguised blessing for us all]??    Aloha!   –Curt

  

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Our Issei [first generation] immigrants from Japan had their creed of giri [serve justly] ninjo [humanity].     Japan samurai were split by these incompatible notions.    Our Nisei [second generation] 100th Batt./442nd warriors such as my dad Toshi 1913-1998 had their creed of kuni no ta-may [serve our U.S.A. faithfully and courageously — all in — “go for broke, bruddah!”]. 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samurai_cinema#Themes

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A recurring conflict the ideal samurai encounters is the ninjo and giriconflict. Ninjo is the human feeling that tells you what is right and giri is the obligation of the samurai to his lord and clan. The conflict originated from overwhelming control of the Tokugawa bakufu government over the samurai’s behavior. Often samurai would question the morality of their actions and are torn between duty and conscience. This conflict transcends eras in samurai films and can create the perception of the protagonist as being the moral underdog or steadfast warrior. In The Last Samurai, Katsumoto is no longer of use to his emperor and sentenced to self-disembowelment. He goes against his duty to follow through with his sentence and flees to fight his final rebellion against the central government’s army. Ninjo and giri conflict is dynamic to the character of the samurai.

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What Jesus prescribes in the samaritan parable  of Matthew 25:40 is disinterested, self-giving care for the “other” [agape]. We are to act on behalf of those who have needs and who reside along the social margins [the hungry, the stranger, the naked, the sick, and the imprisoned].


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This is to say, it is the acceptance of God’s grace and atoning spirit that compel us to look beyond ourselves to help those in need just as Christ did for us.

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On the momentous issue of irony,  chastened KingLit imparts –
 
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This is a very enlightening discourse that gives me a better understanding of Christianity and what is in God’s mind.  I have always had difficulty relating to what captured the imagination and souls of the early Christians who were converted by the Apostle Paul.  I can better relate to Christ’s parables that carried simple messages to simple uneducated people.  These people were “empowered” (mesmerized?) by these radical  messages who previously saw their lot in life as useless and without purpose.  They were suddenly recognized as individuals by a personal caring God. I see your point of Christ using “irony” in his parables.  Regards,  KL
 
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Turning common-sense ideas upside down, confounding the expectations of His audience: He/Jesus preached of “Heaven’s imperial rule” [traditionally translated as “Kingdom of God“] as being already present but unseen; He depicts God as a loving father; He squares shoulders with outsiders and criticizes insiders.   Christ evokes not simply an apocalyptic eschatology/end-time, but more critically a sapiential eschatology, which encourages all of God’s children to repair the world.     Since Christ lived and preached in an oral culture, scholars expect that short, memorable stories or phrases are more likely to be historical and factual.

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Irony:   Based on several important narrative parables [such as the Parable of the Good Samaritan], scholars decided that irony, reversal, and frustration of expectations were characteristic of Christ’s style.   Does a pericope/concise passage illustrate opposites or impossibilities?   If it does, it’s more likely to be authentic.   For example, “love your enemies.”     Not just the Parables but the  beatitudes feature the dramatic presentation and reversal of expectations that are characteristic of Christ.  The poor are accepted as constituting the primary recipients of the Good News and, therefore, as having an inherent capacity of understanding it better than anyone else. That’s pretty threatening for any comfortable Christian. For not only do we have to help the poor, not only do we have to advocate on their behalf, we also have to see them as perhaps understanding God better than we do!  But that’s not a new idea:  It goes back to Jesus. The poor, the sick and the outcast “got” him better than the wealthy did.   Perhaps because there was less standing between the poor and God.   Less stuff [pride].   Maybe that’s why Jesus said in the Gospel of Matthew, “You will have treasure in heaven, and follow me.” Like I said, pretty disturbing, then and now. It’s hardly “the opposite of the Gospel,” as ousted Fox News pundit Glenn Beck said.

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On real time forgiveness, note the instance of the man who accidentally spills a bowl of  chicken soup on another man.   The other man is aghast, then lets out the amazing Grace of a punchline   –  “Well, at least I love the comforting sense of chicken soup!!”   Wow!!

 

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Jesus always embraced the reproached,
the outcasts, of society, knowing that
these imperfect ones had a closer affinity
with God, more so than the overproud
sentients full of contemptuous opinions and

scathing comments vs. others.
To Jesus, imperfection is beautiful, as we
grow in God’s Holiness. His Holiness, is
not outcome dependent for us on earth.

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Ode to my Dad   –

Patti Davis [Ronald Reagan’s daughter] is my age & my fellow resister.    Her eulogy for her dearest dad personifies my feeling for my dearest dad.     


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“I sat beside him as he died.   And now he sits inside my

heart as I live my life, without him but with him.   Love you, Dad,  — Patti.”       


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Love you, gang.

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Dearest Patti’s reminiscences  –“Dad lives in me on the edge of dreams.  He lives in the regrets I carry of my rebellious years and the hurt I caused Dad , which he allowed and blew away like dust.  My sweet memories of Dad keep me afloat.   There was a moment, midway through the Alzheimers which clawed away years, when I was leaving him and I said to Dad, ‘Bye for now, I love you!’   His eyes opened wide in surprise and he said, ‘Well, thank you, thank you so much!’   Dad had no idea who I was.   He was startled and typically gracious about another human being telling him she loved him.   I don’t know if I will ever reach that level of grace, but I’m grateful for having been born to a man who did.   Moments like this revealed what was most essential about Dad — his graciousness, his kindness toward others, his gratitude and his humility.   Dad carried in his pocket a coin which says ‘let go and let God.’   I keep it now in a box on my dresser.   I don’t know where he got it, but I’m guessing someone handed it to him when he was out walking and he looked at the message on it and thought of how lovely it was and how he related to it.   Every day after that, he put it in his pocket — as a blessing, perhaps, to remind him of a stranger’s kindness.  I never stopped believing that he hung the moon, as I remember the nights when I was a child and he traced the constellations for me, showing me Pegasus and Orion.”

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Henry Wadsworth Longfellow:   “Opportunity No Less”   Aging is not dementia but a blessing of a long life lived!

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wisdom and meaning of old age from Henry Wadsworth Longfellow  –

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“Opportunity & Meaning No Less ” –

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For age is opportunity no less,

than youth itself, though in another dress,

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And as the evening twilight fades away,

The sky is filled with stars, invisible by day.

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And as Marc Agronin evokes of Appelfeld’s imagination,

memories of hither and yon take wing & both soothe and

elevate as these ancient memories bring affirmation of the

greatest connections and joys in life — reminiscence’s beauty –

not to restore what has been lost but to experience the gratitude

that can come only with the realization that we never truly lose

the gifts from the most important reference points in our lives.

http://www.forward.com/articles/144274/

Thornton Wilder:

 The greatest tribute to the dead is not grief but gratitude

The greatest tribute to the dead is not grief but gratitude.

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Ellen Howarth:   ‘Tis a Faded Flower   –

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Where is the heart that doth not keep within its inmost core,
some fond remembrance hidden deep of days that are no more –
a faded flower, a broken ring, a tress of my loved one’s hair?

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http://www.bartleby.com/248/504.html

 

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Lesson plans filled with unsettling contempt for others from the holier than thou pharisees scar us all.   As extraordinary sage Steven Kalas born 1957 intones, we desire to love and to be loved beneath our scarred features.

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http://www.lvrj.com/living/what-hurts-most-may-bring-people-closest-together-134200018.html

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The people I know best and with whom I would say I’m the closest all have something in common. I know of their wounds. I know of their losses. It’s the same with people who know me and are close to me. They know the stories behind my psychic, emotional and even physical scars. There is no faster way to know someone but to ask, “Tell me about your life’s greatest loss.”

At the heart of what binds our most treasured, timeless relationships is the knowledge of loss and suffering. Trauma. Injustice. Moral failure. When someone shares these things with us, then and only then can we begin to say we know this person. Then and only then can we say we have a true intimacy.

There is, yet, another echelon of closeness. I refer to people we love, and still love, and with whom we remain close, who have hurt us. And/or we have hurt them. Though, somehow, in this case, the injuries did not extinguish the relationship. This person is still here. Still loving us.

I think of two people in my own life. I see their faces. They love me. Really they do. But, in the history of these relationships, I have behaved badly. In one I abused my power as a bully. In the other I betrayed a trust. And both of these people are still here. Still part of my life. If I think about it too often, it becomes quickly overwhelming.

I think of Thomas. That would be Thomas the disciple of Jesus in the Christian Gospel. It’s Sunday, and, two days ago, Jesus died like a dog. But Thomas’ friends say they have seen Jesus. That he is alive. Thomas scoffed: “Unless I see the mark of the nails in his hands, and put my finger in the mark of the nails and my hand in his side, I will not believe.”

For this line, Thomas went down in history with the moniker “Doubting Thomas,” but I’ve always thought that was unfair. More like “Realistic Thomas.” Jesus doesn’t chastise Thomas for doubting. Instead, Jesus calls his bluff. Jesus shows up again, extends his wounded hands and says, essentially, “You’re on, cowboy. Reach out, see and feel these wounds. Those would be the holes left over from nails.”

“My Lord and my God,” Thomas exclaims.

For my purposes here, my point is not a “religious” one. It’s an existential one. Thomas recognizes Jesus as he knows Jesus’ wounds. The wounds are the ultimate credential of identity. The wounds of which Thomas is not innocent.

I think of my friends who, on their 20th anniversary ask me to preside at their renewal of vows. They gather their children, their family and friends. They stand in their living room and reaffirm the promises of marriage, hope and love. But, see, I know something of the history of this marriage. I know of its joys and celebrations. I know of its wounds. I know of injuries and betrayals. How he has hurt her. How she has hurt him.

Yet, here they stand, telling each other and their Maker of their love, constancy and fidelity. Their hope. Their steadfast willingness to walk the beloved to the grave. And it occurs to me, again, that at the end of 40 to 50 years of healthy marriage, a foundational part of what binds an old man and old woman together is … scar tissue. From which pours not resentment but treasure and blessings. A breathtaking intimacy. A profound knowing. We say: “You see that jagged psychic scar on my beloved’s heart? I did that.”

I presided at the renewal. Then I got out my guitar and sang them the song “Purple Heart”:

Once upon a time you stood before an altar

And you promised not to leave

You held each other’s hand and dreamed a sweet forever

Love drove angels to their knees

Oh, the days they do fly by

Count the tears that you have cried

Count the laughter and the lies

Count your love and times love died

And here you stand together, battle-scarred and torn

The locks of fairy tales have fallen, long since shorn

Love has chosen you, blessed you, crucified you

See what you’ve become

Love’s Purple Heart is won

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No Tears in  Heaven?

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tears_in_Heaven*

tears in heaven are not shed for KingLit Ching born 1936?   


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[KingLit is not perfect, such that KingLit wrongly mucho machos that no tears ever should or will be shed for KingLit.       http://bible.cc/revelation/21-4.htm]
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Should be “let the dead bury the dead.”


And tears in heaven [2 Corinthians 5:9-10 & Revelation 20:11-15 ] are not shed for KingLit Ching?        KingLit exudes candor and honest feelings.       To whom is puritanical spartan KingLit Ching  — acolyte-devotee/son/daughter/grandchild/peer/aunt — to whom?


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Tis’ not “who am I, but TO WHOM am I??”           To whom is puritanical spartan KingLit Ching?

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“To whom are you a neighbor?”  Jesus intones.

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“Now which of these three men do you think seemed to be a neighbor to him who fell among the robbers?”

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He said, “He who showed mercy on him.”

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Then Jesus said to him, “Go and do likewise.”

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Luke 10:30-37





To whom is KingLit???

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Luke 6:38    –  “give & it will be given …”  –
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faith is not outcome dependent, ergo it is not “cutting a deal,” nor a contract/ bargain/advantage/reward/restoration/trade-off/even-equal exchange  — “given to you” means that God recognizes your unacknowledged act of kindness. with faith in God ensuring everlasting life in God, no matter your pain in our sentient earthly sphere.           http://bible.cc/luke/6-38.htm
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1 Corinthians 12:22-26  God recognizes your nameless unacknowledged acts of kindness
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That best portion of a good  man’s life; his little, nameless, unremembered acts of kindness and  love.

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 from William Wordsworth

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from heartful Nani Kyota  –

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The funny thing is that this is something that I have been pondering.  Unfortunately it hasn’t really been on a necessarily “Godly” level.   I have been reading the power and it talks about giving love.  I think with God anything is possible and without him nothing is. I know that when I put him first my day is so much better than when I am rushing and forget what is really important!
On the faith issue, this is where I stand. I have to say that my knowledge of the Bible isn’t what it should be and so I don’t know if this is actually from the Bible but someone told me once that faith and fear cannot occupy the same space and from that moment I really do not fear. Before that I was scared of so many things, now I just try my best to be my very best and I know that is all that God really expects of us. He loves us no matter what and we should do the same for all of our fellow brothers and sisters.

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Second Timothy 1:7,   “For God has
not given us the Spirit of fear; but of power, and of love, and of a sound
mind.”

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from loving Nani Kyota –

Mahalo Curtis for sharing all of these wonderful stories and Scriptures with me. It was really nice to see you last Sunday. I hope that you are doing well.
Happy New Year!
 
Nani
 
 
 
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to paralyzing beauty [inner, not just outer]  Nani Kyota, Jesus’ beautiful child  –

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Hi Nani:    You live around the corner from church, right??   I posted your keiki ohana’s  great song on my blog, along with your comments about “give & it is given”  & Rev. Jeffress [condemning Romney/Huntsman].   Happy New Year!!      I always was into you because I never forgot how disappointed I was when Kewina Palaunu brushed you off the Wednesday before Christmas exactly 2 years ago [2010] at Bible Study.     You asked the most important question since time immemorial  –   “How do I deal with my children?   Sometimes I feel so sad thinking about these matters.”    Kewina’s ongoing message about the “bliss” of Christmas utterly was meaningless and irrelevant and indifferent to the most important question posed to Jesus  –  “How do I cope with life’s challenges?”     Man, Kewina had the opportunity of a lifetime to address your question which came from “be not of this world.”  [Divinity, not the earthly realm]    The Bible has all the answers to the most critical questions beset by earthly beings.    All you needed from Kewina was affirmation on your practical wisdom as Jesus’ devout Bible-hugger!!     ;-)        Simply put, your Faith & Devotion amount to Intercession [prayer for humanity to Heavenly Father] of a most loving order/magnitude/degree.   I will never forget your authenticity, courage, clean heart, & prophecy [anticipate our deepest earthly woes].   Your most ardent fan,    –Curt

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http://bible.cc/romans/8-34.htm

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Christ Jesus, who died–more than that, who was raised to life–is at the right hand of God and is also interceding for us.

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http://bible.cc/galatians/2-20.htm

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Christ lives in me. The life I live in the body, I live by faith in the Son of God, who loved me and gave himself for me.

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for you martial arts followers   –
 
 
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There is no ego wishing to aggrandize itself by punishing the opponent and every move is performed effortlessly before one has time to think.   One blocks every move by one’s opponents yet for all parties involved you might be playing with clouds [it’s painless and without harmful consequence].      The essence of Divinity  — fluid and fulfilling.   Not just physical but spiritual,  Imago Dei, in the Image of God.
 
 
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from loving pure heart Nani Kyota  –

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When given time I found out that Kewina is like all of us, just trying to figure out where we belong in God’s plan.

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I am very glad to call you a friend.    I learn so much from the emails that you send and you inspire me to look even further.
 
 
Malama Pono,
 
Nani

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Great sage Steven Kalas born 1957 on dealing with energy vampires   –

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http://www.lvrj.com/view/mom-s-changing-stories-about-money-cause-hurt-confusion-138834794.html

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tightrope dichotomy of trying to be The Observer (detached, staying objective) yet still having the very real human experience of being “driven crazy.”

It is personal when we are conscripted into someone’s crisis of fear and smallness. It is personal to be deliberately moved about the game board of someone’s life as if we were no more than a lesser chess piece in the contest of ego-defense and self-importance.

It hurts to be treated as a means to an end. The hurt is a sign of our health — our self-respect — not a sign that anything about us needs to be fixed.

And yet … it is equally a sign of self-respect that we make an effort to be The Observer. We do this, too, because we love. Despite our hurt and disappointment, we want to try to understand, to attempt to answer the question of what’s really going on here.

I can be in a relationship with you, or I can manage you in relationship. I prefer to do the former. But, if you absolutely insist, you can make me do the latter. I’ll be disappointed, but I’ll do it. Especially if the alternative is being driven crazy.

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Ron Paul’s M.D. money was made in a White homogeneous middle class & upper class society.   Thence, his hypocrisy in not paying for his campaign mgr.’s medical bills on grounds that these creditors shall be paid out of probate –    which mean that the insolvent probate estate will leave the creditors with no recourse.   There is no safety net unless there is  national health insurance, contrary to Paul’s right wing Libertarianism that patients will be taken care of.  

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Libertarianism#Late_twentieth_century

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Jesus makes clear that to forgive is to forget — propitiosity

“And their sins and iniquities I will remember no more.” Hebrews 10:17
“God’s way of forgiving is thorough and hearty, -— both to forgive and to forget; and if thine be not so, thou hast no portion of His.”  –Leighton

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A fella couldn’t get over being double-crossed by his longtime football buddy.
I tell him, “Brah’, you dwell in bitterness, not in Jesus’ redemption. Choose — be loved by Jesus or your football pal? Forgive yourself, don’t blame yourself for being a fool for redemption [of embracing fully life attendant w/risks of failure-rejection-derision-scorn].
You cannot control the destiny of your football friend, but you can master your attitude about yourself, of course with Jesus’ guidance/inspiration. Heavenly Father says that to forgive in our propiosity/divine revelation actually is to forget, brah’. Your failure, your hurt, your humiliation, visualize a box cupped in both hands, put all of your unbearable/unthinkable worlds in this little box — and give it to Jesus, brah’. Release yourself, distance yourself, from these worlds inside this box, and unburden yourself to Jesus. Give it to Jesus, brah’.
And just as you forgive yourself, you gonna’ be shocked & amazed how easily it’ll be forgotten. All praise to Jesus, brah’, all praise!!”

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And this fella then let out a long-held sigh, and bowed his head, then raised his head, with a lovely glow and a handsome smile on his face. Faith, obedience, endure to the end, in Jesus — works wonders. Remember, faith is not outcome dependent. But Faith is about attitude, of the divine sort a la Revelation.
Love for now and forever.  –Curt]

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/From_each_according_to_his_ability,_to_each_according_to_his_need#Debates_on_the_idea  [utopian communism]

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Marx delineated the specific conditions under which such a creed would be applicable—a society where technology and social organization had substantially eliminated the need for physical labor in the production of things, where “labor has become not only a means of life but life’s prime want.”     Marx explained his belief that, in such a society, each person would be motivated to work for the good of society despite the absence of a social mechanism compelling them to work, because work would have become a pleasurable and creative activity.   Marx intended the initial part of his slogan, “from each according to his ability” to suggest not merely that each person should work as hard as they can, but that each person should best develop their particular talents.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inverse_commons  [analog of communism]

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In the inverse commons,  the opposite results of the law of the commons [oversaturation/eventual extinction of resource by overpopulation, etc.]  effect are witnessed. That is, individuals contributingknowledge and content for the good of the community rather than extracting resources for their own personal gain.   Examples of this are free and open source software and Wikipedia. This phenomenon is linked to “viral” effects and increases in prominence as individuals contribute altruistically and for social gain.

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The inverse commons outcome is likely when the cost of the contribution is much less than its value over time.   Information has this property.   For example, it costs very little for a Wikipedia contributor to enter knowledge from their experience into Wikipedia’s servers, and very little for Wikipedia to serve that information over and over again to readers, generating great value over time.   Unlike the pasture of a physical commons, information isn’t degraded much by use. Thus the value of Wikipedia increases over time, attracting more readers some of whom become contributors, forming a virtuous cycle [opposite of a vicious circle].

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Critical_mass_(sociodynamics)#Fax_machine_example

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/To_each_according_to_his_contribution#Elaboration_in_Gotha  [socialism]

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The principle has its roots in the way that capitalism manages its affairs.   That is, each is rewarded according to how much he produces.   Remuneration increases as the amount of labor contributed increases.    However within capitalism, the means of production are owned by a small minority who does not produce, but rather lives off the labor of others.   Socialism is said to remedy this by putting the means of production in common hands and rewarding individuals according to their contributions.   Chronology –   land [feudalism]  to goods [capitalism] to collective means of production/information  [socialism] to collective exponential benefits [communism].      Margaret Thatcher’s “every man for himself” capitalism/avarice  –   http://www.latimes.com/news/la-fg-britain-thatcher-20120114,0,6755885.story?track=rss&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+latimes%2Fnews+%28L.A.+Times+-+Top+News%29

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Artistic license which results in great movies like “The Last Samurai”  [courage/clean heart/prophecy — anticipate the future]   –

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_a_clef

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Film_%C3%A0_clef

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As faded via spots as is the paint on my car, I am proud of them because an abandoned kitty cat whom I called Brownie [female cat with brown fur] made her home there for the rest of her life.  I am proud to have given Brownie a home and food/water and safety and comfort and joy.   Brownie died of old age and I gaze upon these faded spots on  my car with love and affection for Brownie.

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http://bible.cc/matthew/25-40.htm  [what you do to the least of our world, so do you do this to me]

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http://bible.cc/genesis/50-20.htm   [what others see as faded spots, I see as divine beauty]

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http://bible.cc/2_corinthians/4-7.htm   [treasure of Brownie amid humanity’s treachery in disposing of and betraying Brownie]

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Keoni and Lukini Andrew born 1942/1943 are experts at opposite sex dynamics because the family

as the centerpiece of faith is their whole reason for existence, unlike clueless Earl Dean  E. born 1945 , Biblical

scholar who flubs at application of Scripture to life, all the while preaching Canon like no tomorrow,

ensconced/self-absorbed in his own legend of his perfect marriage to his wife.   Actually, Earl Dean

E. almost never applies Scripture to life because he’s too busy preaching about his perfect marriage

to his wife.    Braggart/phony are not a stretch of imagination as ascriptions.    

Blowhard about his most obvious weakness  – insecurity about himself being unloved in his deepest core.

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Does one move forward or backward in trying to release oneself from the tyranny of one’s own past?    Needing approval ergo excessive neediness vs. the values of self esteem and mutual acceptance/love is to take life out of your hands and into the palms of others, to avert the notion that by taking your life into your own hands means what is most terrible to an insecure person  — no one is to blame.   Self-worth is not verified by others, but simply because you know it/ouvre is so!  If you are ignored or forsaken in this indifferent world, you can continue to feel that you are unlovable, or you can nurture the very qualities of love, tenderness, and support not provided by the rest of the world, and have joy in your transformation of simply accepting yourself for who you are or have become.    So that when you peel off your ego from the reality of your life, you find that the reality of your life again is made up of the contrived egos of others who mask the beautiful fuchsia landscape of our globe.   So that to follow your heart really is the only sane thing to do.   Or as positive life exemplar Sunny Massad says,  when you allow your authenticity AND vulnerability to arise, the phoniness of your personality transitions into the uniqueness of your individuality.   But what is most important is to find peace within and share it with others outside.   Massad quotes Werner Erhard, who says that perpetuating one’s position [ego]  — as self-image/ideology/fantasy/whatever  — is the toxin of the Mind state and the source of all dissatisfaction in life.    Massad points to Eastern/Asian philosophy which takes the mind /ego out of being as the start to wellness of the soul.     The point is not to solve the problems of the mind, but instead to get out of the mind and into the heart/soul of being/wholeness of life itself.    Massad also quotes Coco Chanel   — “How many cares one loses when one decides not to be something but to be someone.”   Ouch!!   :-)

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God never wants us to suffer, but Nature’s course/suffering is our growth in God’s Holiness as we draw closer to God. The experience of loss/pain/ suffering do not shape us, but instead our response to such loss/experience shape our fate/destiny. We don’t choose misfortune, and we have the agency/choice to decide how we react in turn to these sad circumstances/ events. Loss/crisis offer up our transformative change/catalyst to growth, as we impel beyond our ego limitation and then transcend our self- inflated vices. Our deepest loss/ suffering teleport us to a divine ‘aina where we shorn our illusion of our own power/egocentrism, and in this netherland we decide whether to condemn ourselves to misery/self-loathing, or to forgive ourselves for our failed human condition/hamartia [maybe well-intended but miscued just the same]. Yes, the death of the egotistic self conceives the birth of the new self of extraordinary beauty and sensuality, and we do not consume ourselves with the fear of loss as a cop-out to deny us and others our desire to love and to be loved.

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I’ll never forget my Dad’s WWII 442 boys [Dad Toshi 1913-1998, Silver Star recipient 2nd Batt.]  — when they got to Nice [pronounced niece] France, the resorts were on the inland/mauka side of the wide sidewalk separating structures from the beautiful beach.    Unlike our backward thinking planners in Hawai’i,  old world Nice France got right aesthetic beauty/public resources for the public good.   Fast forward nearly 3 decades later  — lonely vigil by high strung Jerry Rothstein 1936-2005 & his ever-devoted wife Judy 1937-2005 [both died in a car wreck when Judy crossed the center line] w/their protest signs on Banyan Drive fronting where the Hilo Haw’n Hotel was to be built, on the site of an ancient fish pond/canoe berth.   Jerry/Judy were correct, whilst our 442 boys reveled in Hilo’s post-WWII/post-Statehood prosperity, not comprehending that short-term gain causes long-term loss [for our progeny’s pristine ecology/environment conservation/preservation].    Our materialistic obsessed boys [Dad’s youngest brothers-in-arm/charges/kozos-kids symbolized by money is god John Ushijima, all born 1922-1924] conveniently forgot about Nice France & the legacy it foretold to forward-thinking Jerry/Judy Rothstein half a world away in Hilo, Hawai’i.   Jerry led PASH to reclaim our ‘aina/ocean for ancient Hawaiian culture, w/Angel Pilago simply pickbacking on adrenaline-rush Jerry.    I knew Jerry/Judy very well — the forsaken duo of our myopic-lens society.   Jerry Rothstein once asked me why I am  into oldtime lore.   Prosaic response  –  1)  my parents were old enough to be my grandparents [their lives interrupted by WWII];    2)  my world is my parents’ reference points of pre-WWII;   3)  mistakes [I didn’t realize how brutal Ho Chi Minh was] & make-up calls [continued respect for my VNW combat peers, when our country all but forsook them] mark my passion for the past  — real modesty is based on hamartia/miscues, not false modesty footed in whim fancy [as w/media portrayal of 1776 revolutionary Tom Paine, who in real life was a failure in capitalism/commerce,  as a corset-maker/tobacco retailer/tax collector, of 2 failed marriages, of ill health –typhus/etc.].

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I was an infantry medic but scored with marksperson rating [expert rating at the top, followed by sharpshooter rating, followed by marksperson rating].

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The expert sniper is a master of stealth movement/undetected/unseen, of camouflage, most critically of patience/pasiensa, to assess terrain/fields of fire/optimum positions-angles  — & result in a gravely disproportionate effect on the enemy  — striking fear/terror in enemy troops/morale  — w/the kill shot’s stone-cold relaxed trigger hand engaged in a clinical quality all its own.   American Revolution hero Daniel Morgan like his more famous namesake Daniel Boone was of Welsh immigrant roots, as fellow expert hunter Timothy Murphy was of brogue Irish strain.   All were backwoodsmen and frontiersmen, who hunted to survive, familiar w/the ways of Indian tribes and the nature of wild prey and predators, where a single isolated movement/visual peek was all it took for the effective kill shot.   Chinese-English descendant Billy Sing 1886-1943 of Gallipoli killed Turk Abdul the super sniper with the one and only first shot, lest Abdul’s first shot kill Sing, Abdul getting the fatal bullet over the barrel of Abdul’s rifle between Abdul’s eyes.   Vietnam War’s Carlos Hathcock 1942-1999 shot game to survive with his backwoods impoverished grandma.   Hathcock’s extraordinary kill shot came after NVN posted $30 G for him to be killed  — Hathcock caught a fleeting glint of light thru the jungle, in this case the sunlight reflecting off the NVN expert sniper’s front lens of his telescopic scope.   Hathcock fired his one and only kill shot [no second chance among experts], & found his foe w/a bullet in his scope eye, the bullet coming thru the foe’s scope sight, meaning that the foe’s rifle was pointed directly at Hathcock at the instant Hathcock’s kill shot hit him in the eye.   Had Hathcock waited an instant longer, the $30 G would’ve been won by the expert sniper foe.    Tim Kellner a decade ago was a naturally gifted sniper and an expert backwood hunter, w/tremendous skills in fieldcraft/covert movement/concealment/patience.     As w/the deadliest snipers of all time [Scot Patrick Ferguson/Tom Plunkett/Ben Powell/Hiram Berdan/Sepoy Bob the Nailer/Rich Travis/Francis Pegahmagabow/Henry Norwest/Finn White Death “Belaya Smert” by Soviet Army  — Simo Hayha 1905-2002/Stalin’s Vassil Zaitsev 1915-1991/Soviet female leopard Lyudmila Pavlichenko 1916-1974/Austrian Josef “Sepp” Allergerger 1924-2010/German Matthias Hetzenauer 1924-2004/New Zealand Alfred Hulme 1911-1982/KingLit Ching’s renowned Fallschirmjager/William S. Brophy/Chester “Chet” Hamilton/Ernest R. Fish/Red China’s Zhang Taofang 1931-2007/Adelbert F. Waldron 1933-1995/Chuck Mawhinney born 1949/Frank Grieci/Scott Dennison/Juba of Baghdad/Brandon McGuire/Oliver “Teddy” Ruecker/Christopher Reynolds/Craig Harrison/Rob Furlong/Aaron Perry]  –  living in the outdoors/woods/jungle heightens the senses, which are dulled terribly by modern conveniences/comfortable urban living.   Wisdom of our ecosystem/environment imbues one in sensitivity to animal life  — animals by their movements/behavior/warning signs/cries/startles give away your positions of stealth/concealment.

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On the domestic front, mob/godfather rule are paramilitary in mentality/psychology, and drop-dead Hollywood handsome Honomu’s Earl Tanimoto’s yamato damashii/stone-cold fearlessness would serve him well/he could stand his ground – were he in this venue, which obviously he is not.    Just the same,  I moniker Earl born 1944 as “Ekolu,” w/the strength of three men his own size, just as Ali early foe Herculean Duke Sabedong’s moniker was Ekolu or Kolu for short, Kolu a bronze Mercury behemoth at 6’7″ 200 lbs.

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tremendous points by sage Steven Kalas on how repressed anger fuels suicide  –

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I published a column in response to a woman whose adult son had completed suicide. You can reference that column at this link:http://www.lvrj.com/view/steven-kalas-therapy-may-help-mother-cope-with-son-s-suicide-127815283.html.

Then I received the heartfelt letter below in reply. My editor has agreed to make an exception in this case for the normal 750-word limit. So, grab a cup of coffee and join the dialogue.

Hello Steven: I read your two articles on suicide. The first was not only wrong but extremely hurtful. I don’t think judging or generalizing about people being in rages will lower the rate (of suicide) or help the relatives. Inadequate medical care for the terminally ill, schizophrenics, bipolar, clinically depressed is a big cause (of suicide). Violence to spouses and children is another reason for it. Bullied gay children also. Victims are in nonsurvival states emotionally and mentally and escape hopelessness, not in rages.

Addiction to legal and illegal medications is also a cause. No work or the parents working too much are causes also. Many different reasons are common. I am a naturalist, not religious, so I don’t judge them and condemn them to hell. I think older people need a more humane death, like in Oregon. I know that they are different from murderers who have more going mentally.

I realize you are probably tired of the sad, depressing topic and need new work. Too long in that area makes people feel angry or depressed. Our society is corrupt and money-hungry, not healthy. Caring and compassion are in short supply. All of the areas need a lot of work. But deciding they die in rages is not truthful, as the relatives know all the problems involved. It’s just a pointless attitude. People all have feelings and are entitled to them except for those who write for newspapers and get more influence and exposure. You should be more careful about generalizing in sad areas. — J.B., Las Vegas

Thank you for your letter, J.B. It was from the heart and deserves a respectful response.

First, I’m writing unaware of a second recent column (you mention reading “two articles”) regarding the subject of suicide. For the record, then, I’m responding only to your concerns about the Aug. 16 column of last year.

Next, I know you’re a survivor of suicide. That’s jargon from the American Association of Suicidology, meaning not that you once tried to kill yourself and survived; rather, that you were closely related to someone who did complete suicide. Surviving suicide is fraught with a terrible and almost always complicated grief. I admire the courage and resolve with which you have walked it. Your brother would smile at the way you’re standing up for him.

Finally, in a historical accident of fate, I actually got my start in behavioral health work in suicidology. Prevention, intervention, postvention — suicidology is a particular focus of my training and work as a clinician. The crux of my Aug. 16 column comes from a speech I often give across the country called “A Unique Grief.” I am a survivor of suicide, three times over. Lost two cousins and an uncle during a 16-month span. It was like a grass fire ascended from hell. I’m right there with you, J.B. Let’s talk.

You say I’m judging. It is true that I take seriously moral deliberation regarding human behavior. Also true that I sometimes am willing to draw moral conclusions, which I’d agree are, then, judgments. Specifically regarding suicide, I make no apologies for my insistence that suicide is a moral event. That is, it can never be a nonmoral event.

If you’re asking about my personal beliefs, I say that suicide is … wrong.

Yet, I suspect that, by judgment, you mean something more akin to condemnation. And that I don’t do. First, because I’m not God. But second, because condemnation is not something I want to do. If I was to say this theologically, I would say that, in the love of our Maker, the door to hell has been permanently locked open. No one resides there who does not absolutely insist upon it. While you said you were not religious, I just wanted you to know that not everyone who lives by faith needs or wants to condemn your loved one to hell. Though I apologize for the many religious folks who have gleefully insisted suicide is unforgivable. Just saying that’s not me.

Generalizations? The idea of suicide as retroflected anger (rage) is no generalization. More a psychoanalytic observation. Perhaps my favorite Sigmund Freud quote of all time is, “The consequences of our behavior tend to reveal our motivations.” Whatever the felt or stated “reasons” of a suicidal patient, a suicide is in the end an act of violence that kills. And this violence is, at minimum, connected to a motive for behaving violently. If not officially rage, it expresses at least a deep antipathy for one’s own life.

You list many “causes” for suicide: mental illness, inadequate care for mental illness, domestic violence, bullying, addiction, joblessness, hopelessness. Yet, in my work, we don’t call these causes; rather, they are risk factors. I’m saying these states of suffering do not explain suicide. All we know is that suicidal patients are commonly experiencing these sufferings. Yet, other patients with these same sufferings don’t kill themselves. So, risk factors point to statistical risk, not to cause.

You say that suicidal patients are different from murderers because murderers “have more going mentally.” I must tell you that, in the case of ordinary people (not sociopaths) who commit murders, I don’t know that I know your view to be true. The evidence points to both people having a lot in common in terms of mentality. Both are commonly in crisis. Both are desperate. Hopeless. Both are in tremendous pain.

And both tend to be angry.

Actually, it’s not at all true that I am “tired” of the topic of sadness. Nor does the subject make me the least angry or depressed. Grief is a particular calling of mine. I find a continuous inspiration in working with sad people.

You and I agree that our society is corrupt and money-hungry. That caring and compassion are in short supply.

You say that my linking suicide and anger is “a pointless attitude.” I, on the other hand, am keenly aware of my point. Two points, specifically: observing this link will decrease the risk of suicide and help survivors.

When patients present as suicidal, they often are unaware of their anger. The inability to hold anger consciously is consequential. Unconscious anger is, at minimum, exhausting. It saps vitality (depression). But it also can be destructive or even lethal. It follows then, that identifying anger (making it conscious) can give a patient more choices about what can be done with anger. Throughout my career, I have many times noticed that encouraging a suicidal patient to meaningfully engage anger usually decreases suicidal ideation, often rendering these fantasies no longer necessary.

Next, the survivors. Over and over I have watched survivors protect their broken hearts with what I called in the column a poetic narrative. The story is told as tragedy, for which we then mobilize compassion, empathy, understanding, and in some cases, unexamined “explanations.” We get the victim off the hook, because our broken hearts very much need for the victim to be exonerated.

Then, several months or even years later, those same survivors often show up in a counselor’s office with malaise, depression, acting-out symptoms — psychic stuckness. They have surrounded their loss with a story that does not permit disappointment, indignation, or as Dr. Sue Chance says (the author of the book I referenced, “Stronger Than Death: When Suicide Touches Your Life,”), being “righteously pissed.”

At some point, most survivors need to include a moral accountability laid at the feet of the victim. Suicide is deeply intimate, deeply personal to those left behind. It hurts. Someone has killed my loved one. That someone is my loved one.

Asking the victim to be ultimately responsible for the decision to die, whatever the list of risk factors, is a crucial part of healing for most survivors. I’m committed to helping them find a voice for that outrage. When they are ready, of course. It’s never my practice to tell any patient how to feel about anything. Rather, I push my patients to tell themselves the truth about how they are feeling, or whether some denied feeling is at the root of their symptoms. As you say, “People all have feelings and are entitled to them.” I completely agree.

I’m sorry you experienced my column as “extremely hurtful.” In my work, I do frequently have to be willing to articulate things that must uncover a great hurt. I take no pleasure in that. But I derive great joy and satisfaction out of watching someone lean into their hurt and thereby find a lighter spirit and more choices for living well.

Which, from the bottom of my heart, is my wish for you.

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http://www.lvrj.com/view/living-through-loved-one-s-suicide-involves-many-layers-of-hurt-139792033.html

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from KingLit Ching born 1936, son of our greatest wayfinder Rev. Hung Wai Ching 1905-2002  –

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Curtis,

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After much research and contemplation,  I think I have an idea of what you see as my mental process being “ironic”  in discovering “other “meanings beyond literal meanings.”   I also understand the difference between satire and sarcasm and irony.  As my hero S.I. Hayakawa, the renowned semanticist would say, “the word is not the thing.”   KL  P.S.  I still consider myself a satirist – case in point, the LOCAL leadership of the East-West Center.  I hold up the LOCALS to ridicule.  I want to lampoon them.  Complacent/uncaring.

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From: KL Ching
Subject: Your Definition of Irony & KL

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Curtis,

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What is your definition of irony and how irony pertains to me.   I am confused.   Regards,  KL

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from KingLit Ching    –

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By golly, I do remember that you wrote this and it is only in the last 24 hours do I more fully understand what you meant. So Curt continues to be the mirror for me to understand who I am.  Understanding myself also enhances my ability to understand others (I am now aware of my visceral, instinctive, intuitive judgments which are only first impressions and not final judgments). It is said by Harvard psychologists/philosophers/educators that the highest form of intelligence is self knowledge. The 2nd highest form of intelligence is understanding others. A special form of intelligence is understanding and practicing sensual sex with cataclysmic finality (your forte, Curt    ;-) . Asceticism is the character of New England Congregationalists with their Spartan lifestyle. We WILL impose our vision for the world.     ;-)

Reinhold Niebuhr is re emerging as the inspiration for neo orthodox theology – the irony and tragedy of history. Niebuhr spoke of the redemptive reorientation of man’s nature and destiny – sin and grace, love and justice, faith and reason, realism and idealism. Pride and selfish self-centeredness are the roots of all evil. No wonder Reinhold Niebuhr is my dad Hung Wai’s and Barack Obama’s hero and, come to think of it, my hero too! Regards,  –KL

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from KingLit Ching   –

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Curt, maybe wading through your batch of quips has offered me redemption.  Hey,  I’m going back to see if I cannot find a tidbit or two which enables me to squeeze though a worm hole and find a new reality in the cosmos.  Too bad Einstein didn’t have a little more time to figure out what is in God’s mind.  In humanity,  Einstein was God sent to give us the incredible peek into the ultimate.    Regards,  –KL  

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http://www.lvrj.com/living/relationship-important-part-of-effective-therapy-127085853.html

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Quality therapy is delivered in the context of a therapeutic relationship! Key word: relationship! Therapeutic benefit emerges — literally — in and proceeding out of the relationship. It is not a relationship of unilateral trust, rather, of mutual trust. It is a deep-seated sense of partnership. Even very sick people bring strengths to the table that have seen them through rough times. I notice these things, admire them and even learn from them.

A veteran therapist friend tells a simple yet powerful story about working with a patient who’d been sexually abused by several males in her family:

“She wailed, ‘Why Me?!’ It was voiced as a demand. She wanted an answer. And, of course, she feared she did something to deserve it. I simply answered, ‘The luck of the draw.’ She stared at me a moment, then shrieked: ‘The luck of the draw? That’s your answer?’ I nodded and said: ‘Yup. You did nothing to deserve it and, as far as I know, God doesn’t get pissed off at little kids and decide to punish them by giving them evil relatives who abuse them. To me that means it’s just the luck of the draw.’ After staring at me several seconds, she burst out laughing and I joined her. She left that session, smiling, shaking her head and marveling, ‘The luck of the draw.’ I might say that I’d come to this conclusion some time before about my own experiences.”

See, a therapist focused on textbooks and technique might have answered, all sincere and philosophical: “I don’t know. Why do you think this happened to you?” But patients deserve more than a Human Echo Chamber. They deserve more than nodding, staring and “Mmm.” They need human reparative interaction.

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The quality of irony/compassion  –

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Luke 10:25-37

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Portraying a Samaritan in positive light would have come as a shock to Jesus’ audience.   It is typical of his provocative speech in which conventional expectations are inverted   — counter-intuitive.

Some religious leaders once asked Jesus, “Who is my neighbor?” And Jesus proceeded to tell the story of “The Good Samaritan,” capping the tale with “So I ask you, which of these was a neighbor to the man?”

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Wow. Jesus’ story doesn’t answer their question; rather, the story challenges their question, changes it from “Who is my neighbor” to “To whom are you a neighbor?” And just like that their universe was an expanded place.

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Therapeutic query is an art form. You can tell when you’ve done it right, because of the sudden silence, the slightly stunned expression on the patient’s face.

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The right question, and only if it is the right question, derails old ways of seeing self and the world.

My favorite compliment from someone addressed is unintended, more an observation: “That’s a really good question.”

If you want to change your life, then change your questions.

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http://www.lvrj.com/living/asking-right-question-often-reveals-new-interpretations-117005138.html

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What Jesus prescribes in this parable Matthew 25:40 is disinterested, self-giving care for the “other” (agape). We are to act on behalf of those who have human needs and who reside along the social margins (the hungry, the stranger, the naked, the sick, and the imprisoned).

Moreover, we can describe this mode of action as love-based because the parable is quintessentially Christological. Jesus is referred to as the “Son of Man,” (v. 31), a “shepherd,” (v. 31), “king,” (vv. 34, 40), and “Lord” (v. 37). All of these monikers are used throughout the Old and New Testaments to prefigure Christ. Matthew thus appears to distinguish general humanitarianism from merciful actions informed by a distinctly Christian maxim. To be in Christ is to feed the hungry, clothe the naked, embrace the stranger and care for the sick, among other things. One might surmise, then, that the previously mentioned theological doctrines of grace, justification, and atonement do not have to be mentioned overtly because they are inextricably linked to this Christian love ethic. This is to say, it is the acceptance of God’s grace and atoning work that compels us to look beyond ourselves to help those in need just as Christ did for us.

This latter point is important because all too often we separate Martin Luther King, Jr.’s love ethic from the Christian faith. Surely King was informed by varying philosophical and religious principles, which included Gandhian satyagraha (love force), Hindu and Buddhistahimsa (non-violence), and Henry David Thoreau’s theory of civil disobedience. But King’s view of Christian salvation was tied to social justice.  Christians have been saved (soterion) and set apart (ekklesia) for a particular purpose which is found in Micah 6:8, “to do justice, and to love mercy, and to walk humbly with your God.” This is why King adopted the slogan “Redeeming the Soul of America” for his civil rights organization, the Southern Christian Leadership Coalition. King believed that the quest for civil and human rights for all of humanity, particularly the most vulnerable, were integral to the Christian mission and evidence of human redemption.

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http://www.theafricanamericanlectionary.org/PopupLectionaryReading.asp?LRID=65

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From KingLit Ching  –

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The quality of irony is not strained [irony must flow freely & not be forced out like a flop joke][Portia in Shakespeare’s Merchant of Venice]‏   –

Curtis,

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  1. Christ  preached a gospel of liberation from injustice in startling parables andaphorisms.    An iconoclast/progressive reformer, Christ broke with established Jewish theological canons and social conventions both in His teachings and behaviors, often by turning common-sense ideas upside down, confounding the expectations of His audience: He preached of “Heaven’s imperial rule” [traditionally translated as “Kingdom of God“] as being already present but unseen; He depicts God as a lovingfather; He squares shoulders with outsiders and criticizes insiders.   Christ evokes not simply an apocalyptic eschatology/end-time, but more critically a sapiential eschatology, which encourages all of God’s children to repair the world.     Since Christ lived and preached in an oral culture, scholars expect that short, memorable stories or phrases are more likely to be historical and factual.
  2. Irony: Based on several important narrative parables [such as the Parable of the Good Samaritan], scholars decided that irony, reversal, and frustration of expectations were characteristic of Christ’s style.   Does a pericope/concise passage illustrate opposites or impossibilities?   If it does, it’s more likely to be authentic.   For example, “love your enemies.”     Not just the Parables but the  beatitudes feature the dramatic presentation and reversal of expectations that are characteristic of Christ.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irony#Socratic_irony\

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Socratic irony

This is “The dissimulation of ignorance practised by Socrates as a means of confuting an adversary”.   Socrates would pretend to be ignorant of the topic under discussion, in order to draw out the inherent nonsense in the arguments of his interlocutors. Chambers dictionary has: “a means by which a questioner pretends to know less than a respondent, when actually he knows more.”

Zoe Williams of The Guardian wrote: “The technique [of Socratic irony], demonstrated in the Platonic dialogues, was to pretend ignorance and, more sneakily, to feign credence in your opponent’s power of thought, in order to tie him in knots.”

A more modern example of Socratic irony can be seen on the 1970s American television show, Columbo. The fictional character, Lt. Columbo, is seemingly naïve and incompetent. His untidy appearance adds to this fumbling illusion. As a result, he is underestimated by the suspects in murder cases he is investigating. With their guard down and their false sense of confidence, Lt. Columbo is able to solve the cases leaving the murderers feeling duped and outwitted.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Escapism

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The Time Machine depicts the Eloi, a lackadaisical, insouciant race of the future, and the horror their happy lifestyle belies.

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Tremendous Steven Kalas’ metaphor/symbolism on the issue/challenge of casual sex   –

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One of the risks of casual sex is sometimes one partner falls in love. Ouch. That is difficult. Sex is gestalt. It cranks you open. And you don’t always get to decide when your heart spontaneously opens to another human being. So casual sex comes with this warning label:

Warning! You might someday look across a pillow and find yourself head over heels in love with someone who is not in love with you, and that will hurt, and you will likely lose your friend.

And sometimes casual sex can unfold the happy surprise that both people fall in love. Sometimes casual sex is the serendipitous road to something deeper, even if both parties could’ve sworn they were not looking for it.

So, think of yourself as walking on a long, tiring journey. You find yourself in front of a McDonald’s. You’re hungry. Yet, you see a sign out front that says, “Five-star French restaurant ahead,” but it doesn’t say how far ahead. So, you have to ask yourself, “How hungry am I?” Go in and get a Big Mac if you want. It’s fast, easy and quite tasty. But go in with every intention. With your head held high and your eyes wide open. Take radical responsibility for going in there. Surrender all rights to ever be mad or disappointed in McDonald’s for not being a five-star French restaurant. Because that is ridiculous, not to mention hypocritical.

Or, take a breath and decide you’re not as hungry as you thought. And keep walking.

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http://www.lvrj.com/view/casual-sex-relationships-a-part-of-modern-culture-135491598.html

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When I say that we don’t get to decide when we fall in love, or with whom, I emphasize the experience of falling in love. Falling in love is a gestalt — that is, a spontaneous movement of the human soul that happens independent of sheer will.

We don’t decide to fall in love. Falling in love is a happening. It can happen when you’re hoping for it and when you’re not even looking for it. Good friends can be good friends for months and even years, and then suddenly go wide-eyed to discover that they are in love. Men and women who are actually quite content in their marriages can suddenly find themselves confronted with a significant emotional bond with someone else. The bond is inexplicable. Surprising. Even disturbing and unwanted. But nonetheless real.

We don’t decide the who and when of falling in love. You can’t will it because there is no muscle to flex. It happens. For that matter, you can’t decide to fall out of love either. If you find yourself in love with someone in an inappropriate or untenable context, you can certainly decide not to act on the emotion. But you can’t decide to have the feeling, nor can you merely decide to end the feeling. The only way to stop being in love is starve it to death — that is, to arrange your life so as to essentially ignore it until it erodes, atrophies and dies of natural causes.

But you are absolutely right in insisting that, once in love, we have a radical responsibility for what happens next. We can act on it. Embrace it, as you say. Behave in ways that are loving. Or not. Yes, we can decide to be open to the possibility, or decide to be closed to the possibility. But, I say again, tons of folks who swore they were lock-tight closed to the idea of love sometimes find themselves nonetheless in love.

We don’t decide to fall in love. But once in love, we do decide what to do next. We are free, as you say, to embrace it or relinquish it and walk away. I’m continuously amazed, frankly, at the frequency with which people fall in love and then decide not to choose it, embrace it or realize its potential.

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http://www.lvrj.com/view/love-may-sneak-upon-us-but-it-must-be-nurtured-to-grow-139270018.html

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The legacy of Chiune Sugihara   –

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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/mark-b-salomon/the-legacy-of-sugihara_b_1228494.html?ref=daily-brief?utm_source=DailyBrief&utm_campaign=012712&utm_medium=email&utm_content=BlogEntry&utm_term=Daily%20Brief

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Iconic images, such as a German cattle car used to transport victims to their extermination, must be seen and touched for Museum visitors to comprehend the enormity of the atrocities. The truth can only prevail through continual education of children at formative ages and broad exposure to man’s inhumanity whenever and wherever it arises. As I personally seek to “pay forward” Sugihara’s righteous deeds on behalf of my grandfather and countless others, I commit that his actions and its implicit message about the sanctity of human life and the need to combat bigotry will not be lost on my generation and those which follow.

The courage to act, even when the world remains silent, is a powerful lesson that needs to be taught to the young. Sugihara was not alone; others acted to save lives, often at great personal risk or suffering the ultimate penalty of death. Who were these points of light, in what was otherwise a vast sea of darkness? The list of righteous among nations from World War II includes Raoul Wallenberg, King Christian X of Denmark, the Bulgarian Orthodox Church and the entire village of Le Chambon, France (See “The Righteous” by Martin Gilbert). When interviewed years later, those still alive seemed genuinely surprised by the fuss, as they were merely following their moral compass and upbringing in daring to do what was right.

Winston Churchill once wrote: “We make a living by what we get; We make a life by what we give.”

By this standard, Sugihara and the other saviors represent heroes for the ages, whose stories must be told. They gave the ultimate gift: the gift of life.

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great Joseph Campbell [mythology thruout history]  –

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As the ultimate truth cannot be expressed in plain words, spiritual rituals and stories refer to it through the use of “metaphors,” a term Campbell used heavily and insisted on its proper meaning: In contrast with comparisons, which use the word like, metaphors pretend to a literal interpretation of what they are referring to, as in the sentence “Jesus is the Son of God” rather than “the relationship of man to God is like that of a son to a father.” According to Campbell, the Genesis myth from the Bible ought not be taken as a literal description of historical events happening in our current understanding of time and space, but as a metaphor for the rise of man’s cognitive consciousness as it evolved from a prior animal state.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Campbell#Monomyth

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Power_of_Myth

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from KingLit Ching  – 

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I  HAVE MUCH in common with Denise.  She IS a lovely person with great insights and a world of compassion and understanding.  She is your biggest fan.  Tom Coffman is also a big fan of you Curtis, telling me that Curtis “knows everything about everything.”  Ho man, no get big head, eh.   Denise complimented me on my knowledge of home furnishings but I am not a mahu.  How she know I not mahu?  By the way,  I do not care to discuss interior design and home furnishings with straight guys like you, Curtis.  Gay guys are much more knowledgeable!   Of course, gay or straight, no matter.  I just funning to needle you!  — KL

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from Denise  –

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aloha curtis,
i’m just an admirer of those who have achieved much more.  and am
able to pass on part of my memory chip!
my goal is to one day leave a mark that will do for all humanity.  even
if it’s just a small act of kindness. we are all humans on this earth
and we are all the same.

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Aloha Curtis –
The list of authors are some of my favorites.
Everyday I try to learn something new, even if it’s a new word.
Today, I’ve gain a lot of knowledge.
Thank you for always including the websites on your emails for reference.
You’re a wonderful teacher.
Thank you from your humble student.
aloha,
denise

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Curtis said –

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Denise reminds me of stout-hearted inimitable Scot-Irish settlers to America in our pre-Revolutionary War era, our so-called later hardy resilient ones like great historian David McCullough & deepest writer John Steinback.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Scotch-Irish_Americans

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scotch-Irish_American#Origins

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from lovely Leilehua Yuen –My father’s mother was Irish/English. Kavenaugh (sp?) on her father’s side. Indeed, the more I teach Hawaiian culture and history, the more I connect to global culture and history!

Malama pono,
Leilehua

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musical scale as symbol of sentiment   –

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Denise Takashima’s favorite singer Carlos Santana’s melodies are somber sharps & minors [musical scale], vs. youngster [my hero] Jonny Lang, whose melodies are exhilarating full notes & 7ths.  

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jonny_Lang

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Exhibit A:   Santana’s hurt & disappointment at the break-up of his longtime marriage to his childhood sweetheart.

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Somber tones symbolize “higher truths” [the courage to love] & “ultimate disguised blessings” [reaffirming self-worth & self-respect when we are present/attentive in desiring to understand — to answer the question of what’s really going on here, so to speak].   

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CNN needs to terminate Piers Morgan until there are 1)   assurances that no criminal charges against him are filed and 2) that viewers are given an amount of time so he can be forgiven.


“compromise a source” insinuates concealment and deceit by Piers Morgan.    Heather Mills’ denial of being the source further damages Morgan by insinuating that whoever is the source was unauthorized to divulge such confidential communication between Paul McCartney & Heather Mills.   Mills ends up with the last laugh here.    How does a PR “shield” be worded to exonerate Morgan?  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piers_Morgan#Phone_hacking_allegationsOn 20 December 2011 Morgan was a witness by satellite link from the United States at the Leveson Inquiry. While he ‘did “not believe to the best of my recollection”‘ that phone hacking had occurred at the Mirror, he admitted to listening to a voice mail left by Paul McCartney for Heather Mills, then the musicians wife, but refused to ‘”discuss where he was played that tape or who played it – it would compromise a source.” Appearing as a witness at the same Inquiry on 9 February 2012, Mills was asked under oath if she had ever made a recording of Paul McCartney’s phonecalls or answerphone messages and had ever played it to Piers Morgan or “anybody else”, she replied: “Never.” Mills told the inquiry that Morgan was “a man that has written nothing but awful things about me for years and would have relished telling the inquiry if she had played a personal voicemail message to him.”
 
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To Hawaiian expert Don J. Pakele:   Please input wiki wiki on Ana Loke.  I contacted Suzy Case [former Congressman Ed Case’s mom] for input from the Case ohana/family.   Thanks, gang.   Kansas grangers [vs. railroad barons-banking moguls]/etc.  had major impact on Hawai’i history, ergo larger than life progressive reformers like Oren E. Long [liberated plantation kids via attainability of high school diploma for kids born after 1919, Long was our DPI public schools chief 1934-1946], and sullen Martin Pence [renegade Democrat amid GOP domination], and historian Tom Coffman [Tom’s “Huck Finn” agrarian Kansas childhood reprises Sockless Jerry Simpson  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jerry_Simpson]     [Tom engaged in our modern holy grail — the Civil Rights movement in the Deep South – where Tom lived MLK’s dream — equal footing for everyone].    Randy Roth also is a Kansan but is not a heavyweight like the destiny-makers above.

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Hi Curt:   The Anna Rose story (Queen Anna) is interesting. Did some more research. See the attached. Anna Rose was her english name. Her real name was Ana Kanaina Loke. Is that a familiar name in Hilo history?     Regards,  —   Fred Greguras   

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http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1936&dat=18981001&id=qbAgAAAAIBAJ&sjid=omkFAAAAIBAJ&pg=847,3799498

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Suzanne:  The article opens up with no problem.    Fred, Jim Case born 1920 [Suzy’s husband & former Congressman Ed Case’s dad — Ed my Hilo peer born 1952] opened up Hilo atty. scion Carlsmith’s Honolulu office 50 yrs. ago.    Quiet Jim contrasts vs. extrovert atty. Dan [Steve’s dad].   Suzy’s daughter also is Suzy Case [ecologist].   Fred, take it from here & keep me posted.   Aloha!

 

From:  Suzi Case

To Mary and Curtis:

Jim’s grandfather Judge Daniel H. Case of Maui was part of a delegation that went to Washington at that time. Please point out to me the article that has his name in it.

Thanks.  Suzanne

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fine songs   —
 
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 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vb0I16-QF-s&feature=related


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
continue from here  —
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vb0I16-QF-s&feature=related

On Ernie Davis:  The man was modest and self-effacing, even when showered with accolades: school records, All-American, top draft choice, decent student, first black Heisman winner.
“A guy can get caught up in that,” Wooten said. “Not Ernie. He was just as humble.”
Davis hit the limelight at a time when black entertainers and athletes often were measured by their stance on racial injustice. The risky route was to speak out. The safe route was to stand down and be accepted by white America.
Davis was popular without being appeasing. He was aware and contributed to change, but in such a kind and genuine way that he was respected by both races.
“I think he was born with it,” Jim Brown said, “because you can’t fake it and you can’t pretend to have it. It’s a gift.”
Davis’ Uncle Chuck said Ernie once told him his purpose in life was to make people happy.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


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45 Responses to Sublime

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  5. Pingback: sage Rev. James Martin: Liberation theology has also animated some of the great Christian witnesses of our time. Several of my brother Jesuits (and their companions), some of whom wrote and taught liberation theology, were assassinated at the University o

  6. Pingback: sage Rev. James Martin: Liberation theology has also animated some of the great Christian witnesses of our time. Several of my brother Jesuits (and their companions), some of whom wrote and taught liberation theology, were assassinated at the University o

  7. Pingback: sage Rev. James Martin: Liberation theology has also animated some of the great Christian witnesses of our time. Several of my brother Jesuits (and their companions), some of whom wrote and taught liberation theology, were assassinated at the University o

  8. Pingback: sage Rev. James Martin: Liberation theology has also animated some of the great Christian witnesses of our time. Several of my brother Jesuits (and their companions), some of whom wrote and taught liberation theology, were assassinated at the University o

  9. Pingback: sage Rev. James Martin: Liberation theology has also animated some of the great Christian witnesses of our time. Several of my brother Jesuits (and their companions), some of whom wrote and taught liberation theology, were assassinated at the University o

  10. Pingback: sage Rev. James Martin: Liberation theology has also animated some of the great Christian witnesses of our time. Several of my brother Jesuits (and their companions), some of whom wrote and taught liberation theology, were assassinated at the University o

  11. Pingback: sage Rev. James Martin: Liberation theology has also animated some of the great Christian witnesses of our time. Several of my brother Jesuits (and their companions), some of whom wrote and taught liberation theology, were assassinated at the University o

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  14. Pingback: If we’re going to write, it is because we have a desire to express ourselves, even if we don’t quite understand what we wish to say. It might just be an inner yearning, but by making the choice to engage in the process rather than the result, our work

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