Olive branch

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The National Enquirer says, “For inquiring minds.” But they mean prurient minds, and in some cases sadistic curiosity.

I mean that, once the unlovely story is told, I find that I don’t keep track of the unlovely story. When, by chance, I should cross paths with former acquaintances years later, I’m not focused on the mistakes and failures. I often don’t remember them. What I celebrate is the courageous way our pilgrim souls have embraced those unlovely events and turned them into redemption, humility, creativity, gratitude, and commitments to live with integrity and meaning.

You don’t have to be a counselor or a priest to accept a pilgrim’s entrustment of some personal darkness or gaping vulnerability. Real friends do this. Loving family does this. It is our honor to guard these treasures, and take them quietly to our graves.

Think about the people who have and are faithfully guarding your treasures, and be grateful.

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http://www.lvrj.com/living/confidentiality-helps-create-sacred-space-of-trust-139177164.html

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1 Corinthians 1:26-27  —  Remember, dear   brothers and sisters, that few of you were wise in the world’s eyes or   powerful or wealthy when God called you.   Instead, God chose things   the world considers foolish in order to shame those who think they are   wise.   And He chose things that are powerless to shame those who   are powerful, so the same God chose those who reside in the forsaken social   margins.

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1 Corinthians 2:6

–Be not of this world–   [be of the spiritual   dimension, with comfort & solace & companionship with thyself in simplicity and contentment]

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Yes, Stephen Hawking & atheists correctly say that we have only one chance  — our mortal lives — to make a difference for the better for all living things.   Correctly make the best of it.   

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And that if we happen to be martyrs/exemplars [e.g. Holocaust victims] for the good side of humanity by being disincentives to human barbarism/savagery, at least we take comfort in manifesting the olive branch to avert recurrence of the evil/indifference/selfishness inherent in us all  [olive branch being blessed creation of God’s State of Israel].  

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Life also is a challenge regardless of our evil human condition  –  nature’s calamities beset us all on this earth  — so that Hawking & atheists correctly say to minimize the risks of injury/death via our inherent good cognition and to tough it out as best as we can.    Such risks are facts of life, so to speak.   

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Redemptive suffering means to grace/forgive a plight/fate/person for your self-sufferance which averts another person from suffering, typified by Scripture’s Hath No Greater Love than to Lay Down One’s Life for Another. John 15:13

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Traditional Catholicism’s redemptive suffering about punishment and more punishment wholly is off the mark. This is the Vatican’s spool to rope you in for indulgences/money. Its golden rule is whoever has the gold rules, straight from our Pontiff’s pulpit.

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Dostoevsky dives into the dual nature of suffering — orthodox Catholic punishment, and Dostoevsky’s Sonya as the whore/saint who suffers because of and for others, and thus becomes most Christ-like as Sonya Grows in His Holiness, no matter her social standing/economic status on our mortal plane.

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Magnanimous Viktor Frankl’s exemplar of the old man who finally realizes that his suffering the loss of his lifelong dearest companion wife allows her not to suffer if her husband had died before her — releases this husband from his misery and pain of losing his wife. He suffers because of and for his departed wife, and such suffering finally is accepted with tremendous equanimity by the heretofore tormented husband.     Redemptive suffering.

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And as with extraordinary sage Steven Kalas’ example about his biological father who gave up Steven born 1957 and his older sister for adoption to Steven’s biological mother and her new husband when Steven was just one year old, to afford Steven and his sister a better life with Steven’s biological mother & adoptive father — at which time Steven’s biological dad chose a vasectomy — THIS WAS THE HIGHER/DEEPER TRUTH!! It broke dad’s heart to lose his children. And so he made certain he never would be a father again. The Ultimate Disguised Blessing is that Steven’s biological dad’s vasectomy exemplified/suffused of redemptive suffering a la Dostoevsky’s Sonya/Frankl’s exemplar of the old man.

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So if you have a choice between redemption/forgiveness and bitterness, choose redemption, no matter how difficult emotionally it is.

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To address the question of redemptive suffering,  here is great teacher Viktor Frankl,  Holocaust survivor and the genesis of the pschotherapy/philosophical school of  “The Will to Meaning in Life.”   –
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According to Frankl, “We can discover this meaning in life in three different ways:  (1) by creating a work or doing a deed;  (2) by experiencing something or encountering someone; and (3) by the attitude we take toward unavoidable suffering,”  and that “everything can be taken from a person but one thing:   The last of the human freedoms—to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances.”   On the meaning of suffering, Frankl gives the following example:

Once, an elderly general practitioner consulted me because of his severe depression. He could not overcome the loss of his wife who had died two years before and whom he had loved above all else. Now how could I help him? What should I tell him? I refrained from telling him anything, but instead confronted him with a question, “What would have happened, Doctor, if you had died first, and your wife would have had to survive you?” “Oh,” he said, “for her this would have been terrible; how she would have suffered!” Whereupon I replied, “You see, Doctor, such a suffering has been spared her, and it is you who have spared her this suffering; but now, you have to pay for it by surviving and mourning her.” He said no word but shook my hand and calmly left the office.
— Viktor Frankl
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Frankl emphasized that realizing the value of suffering is meaningful only when the first two creative possibilities are not available [for example, in a concentration camp] and only when such suffering is inevitable – he was not proposing that people suffer unnecessarily.

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And on redemptive suffering as Irony, note the understandable sentient self-lamentation of Earl Dean Edmoundson born 1945  —

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Biblical pundit Earl Dean Edmoundson of Honomu [former Ishigo Bakery] painted for free his brethren’s church in Puna — didn’t even get a common courtesy thank you from its pastor — and subsequently Dean fumed and steamed for a week over such idiotic disregard of Dean’s “giving”  — well, as Jesus would have it, Dean’s wife June [the strength in the household] comforted Dean & intoned that God works in mysterious ways  — “turn the other cheek” by forgiving the so-called insolent pastor, and Dean’s “giving” is not in vain because Jesus rejoices at Dean’s unction/giving spirit, as do the Puna congregation members [Dean is a head deacon at the Honomu Living Waters Church 40 miles northbound]  — and as June so lovingly evokes, maybe God meant for Dean not to get a thank you from the Puna pastor — to test Dean’s strength of belief in God — that when you give, don’t “be of this world,” i.e,. the blessing is that you give for your love of God, not to get a thank you “of this earth.”   And maybe, even maybe, the Puna pastor tested Dean’s strength by looking “to see”  if Dean would end up sore & hurt incessantly.   Maybe?!   Only God knows.   Children of God — innocent in Jesus’ eyes.    See how irony cuts “right to the chase,” so to speak??
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 Reprise 1 Corinthians 1:26-27  —  Remember, dear brothers and sisters, that few of you were wise in the world’s eyes or powerful or wealthy when God called you.    In Dean Edmoundson’s case, those who reside in the forsaken social margins in Puna might benefit from Dean’s painting of their church!
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Second Timothy 1:7,   “For God has not given us the Spirit of fear; but of power, and of love, and of a sound mind.”
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Erudite Nani Kyota has said something really revelatory and significant, as Nani’s unconscious has made a connection with the deeper emotional reality evident in us all.    Suffering is not about pain, but about the freedom to choose emerging meaning and hope.
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“Suffering” [noun] is not explained in our deepest spiritual wellsprings.   It simply is acknowledged a priori.   Jesus doesn’t say “pick up my cross and follow me.”   Jesus says “pick up YOUR cross and follow me.”   Suffering is of THIS world.   To deal with suffering is to deal with loss, the death of possibilities/hopes/dreams, the pain in our souls, so to speak, though our myriad cultural languages do not speak of pain per se, but of profound loss —  and the freedom to choose how and to what extent we deal with suffering.
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Transformative suffering refers to a conscious encounter with loss anchored by the hope of emerging meaning and human transformation, especially in our hearts of ANOTHER world/realm.     
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Let the mystery of suffering be the mystery, as extraordinary sage Steven Kalas born 1957 intones.
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Our temptation is to reduce the suffering to something less chaotic and more intellectually manageable.   “There must be a reason,” we protest. And so we construct reasons. Often the reasons make us even more miserable.
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Share the suffering. The opportunity to tell the story of our suffering to a compassionate and skillful listener is helpful beyond measure. Simply in the telling and retelling, we begin to shift perspective, to put a healing distance between us and the pain.
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Turn to the wisdom of symbol and ritual. Medals of honor, funerals, statues and monuments, ritual mourning, legacy, keepsakes — we are symbolic creatures, and our symbols help us to embrace and transcend our suffering.
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Discover redemptive mission. Many people discover meaning in suffering as they work to redeem their suffering in service to the world. And so the alcoholic becomes an AA sponsor. The mother whose child is killed by a drunken driver becomes an activist with Mothers Against Drunk Driving. The mercenary becomes a naturalist. The victim of child abuse becomes a marriage and family counselor. And so it goes.
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Turn suffering to witness. Sometimes we suffer as a testimony against injustice. We decide to suffer as a way of absorbing the cost of hatred and bearing witness against the insanity of revenge. Or sometimes we willingly suffer for the sake of endurance alone. That is, as a witness to the goodness of life.
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Suffering as a fact of life embraces an intention and willingness to be radically open and present to life as life is — joyous or sorrowful, delightful or painful.

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http://www.lvrj.com/living/lifes-journey-includes-pain-of-suffering-69506497.html

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from magnanimous Carol Ludloff Arnold  –   Thanks as always, for these beautiful recollections,  as wonderful Nani Kyota shares here [above]!!

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Don’t you have something to offer in terms of your own life experiences akin to Jesus’ Parable/Pericope  [reversal of convention/a confounding Truth which reveals a disguised blessing for us all]??    Aloha!   –Curt

  

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Our Issei [first generation] immigrants from Japan had their creed of giri [serve justly] ninjo [humanity].     Japan samurai were split by these incompatible notions.    Our Nisei [second generation] 100th Batt./442nd warriors such as my dad Toshi 1913-1998 had their creed of kuni no ta-may [serve our U.S.A. faithfully and courageously — all in — “go for broke, bruddah!”]. 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samurai_cinema#Themes

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A recurring conflict the ideal samurai encounters is the ninjo and giriconflict. Ninjo is the human feeling that tells you what is right and giri is the obligation of the samurai to his lord and clan. The conflict originated from overwhelming control of the Tokugawa bakufu government over the samurai’s behavior. Often samurai would question the morality of their actions and are torn between duty and conscience. This conflict transcends eras in samurai films and can create the perception of the protagonist as being the moral underdog or steadfast warrior. In The Last Samurai, Katsumoto is no longer of use to his emperor and sentenced to self-disembowelment. He goes against his duty to follow through with his sentence and flees to fight his final rebellion against the central government’s army. Ninjo and giri conflict is dynamic to the character of the samurai.

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Per Hilo Tribune-Herald  September 8, 1941, the Hilo Japanese Association (mainly the Hilo Japanese Chamber of Commerce) leaders met with special agent in charge of the FBI in the Territory of Hawaii  — Robert L. Shivers  —  at Hilo’s Naniloa Hotel.   Assuring these local Japanese leaders that the U.S. will take care of them even in case of war between the U.S. and japan, and that there will be no need of fear or alarm among the local Japanese population,  Shivers said that as long as they abide by the law, there will be nothing to fear.   Sadly, most of these attendees, born before the turn of the last century (born in the 1890s and a few born before), aliens (no naturalization for Japanese nationals until after 1952)  — eventually were interned after the bombing of Pearl Harbor 3 months later.   Present were banker T.R. Saiki (CC Kennedy “kozo”/protégé), Hawaii Hat retailer Atsuo Sakimizuru, Yoichi Hata (Y. Hata wholesaler), “police court”/informal attorney Kango Kawasaki (whose hero/”oyabun” was Marcus Aurelius),  merchant Gunichi Kuwahara, Yaroku Tanaka, Minoru Murakami, Eikichi Ochiai, Kiyo Okubo,  and original buddahead Democrat (predecessor of Jack Burns’ kozo Scrub Tanaka)  eye doctor Ernest M. Kuwahara.   The only present “insurgent”  Kuwahara was a fully assimilated Jeffersonian American,  but was typecast as “noncompliant/disobedient” to the established order (Big 5 stranglehold).    Ironically, the other older assembled members were arch-conservative establishment  supporters   — yet left and almost all right political spectrum members were interned.    Very sad.    Unlike on O’ahu where Jack Burns,  Army designate Lt. Marsten, brokered by Robert Shivers, were educated and empathetic to buddaheads, here on the island of Hawai’i our ultra-patriotic Americans assembled  — were not so fortunate.   Also ironically, among the greatest non-Israeli Jewish heroes globally, Mickey Marcus, was a provost marshal in Hilo during WWII.

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What Jesus prescribes in the samaritan parable  of Matthew 25:40 is disinterested, self-giving care for the “other” [agape]. We are to act on behalf of those who have needs and who reside along the social margins [the hungry, the stranger, the naked, the sick, and the imprisoned].


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This is to say, it is the acceptance of God’s grace and atoning spirit that compel us to look beyond ourselves to help those in need just as Christ did for us.

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On the momentous issue of irony,  chastened KingLit Ching born 1936 imparts –
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“This is a very enlightening discourse that gives me a better understanding of Christianity and what is in God’s mind.  I have always had difficulty relating to what captured the imagination and souls of the early Christians who were converted by the Apostle Paul.  I can better relate to Christ’s parables that carried simple messages to simple uneducated people.  These people were “empowered” (mesmerized?) by these radical  messages who previously saw their lot in life as useless and without purpose.  They were suddenly recognized as individuals by a personal caring God. I see your point of Christ using “irony” in his parables.  Regards,  KL”
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Turning common-sense ideas upside down, confounding the expectations of His audience: He/Jesus preached of “Heaven’s imperial rule” [traditionally translated as “Kingdom of God“] as being already present but unseen; He depicts God as a loving father; He squares shoulders with outsiders and criticizes insiders.   Christ evokes not simply an apocalyptic eschatology/end-time, but more critically a sapiential eschatology, which encourages all of God’s children to repair the world.     Since Christ lived and preached in an oral culture, scholars expect that short, memorable stories or phrases are more likely to be historical and factual.

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Irony:   Based on several important narrative parables [such as the Parable of the Good Samaritan], scholars decided that irony, reversal, and frustration of expectations were characteristic of Christ’s style.   Does a pericope/concise passage illustrate opposites or impossibilities?   If it does, it’s more likely to be authentic.   For example, “love your enemies.”     Not just the Parables but the  beatitudes feature the dramatic presentation and reversal of expectations that are characteristic of Christ.  The poor are accepted as constituting the primary recipients of the Good News and, therefore, as having an inherent capacity of understanding it better than anyone else. That’s pretty threatening for any comfortable Christian. For not only do we have to help the poor, not only do we have to advocate on their behalf, we also have to see them as perhaps understanding God better than we do!  But that’s not a new idea:  It goes back to Jesus. The poor, the sick and the outcast “got” him better than the wealthy did.   Perhaps because there was less standing between the poor and God.   Less stuff [pride].   Maybe that’s why Jesus said in the Gospel of Matthew, “You will have treasure in heaven, and follow me.” Like I said, pretty disturbing, then and now. It’s hardly “the opposite of the Gospel,” as ousted Fox News pundit Glenn Beck said.

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On real time forgiveness, note the instance of the man who accidentally spills a bowl of  chicken soup on another man.   The other man is aghast, then lets out the amazing Grace of a punchline   –  “Well, at least I love the comforting sense of chicken soup!!”   Wow!!

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Jesus always embraced the reproached,
the outcasts, of society, knowing that
these imperfect ones had a closer affinity
with God, more so than the overproud
sentients full of contemptuous opinions and

scathing comments vs. others.
To Jesus, imperfection is beautiful, as we
grow in God’s Holiness. His Holiness, is
not outcome dependent for us on earth.

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Ode to my Dad   –

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Patti Davis [Ronald Reagan’s daughter] is my age & my fellow resister.    Her eulogy for her dearest dad personifies my feeling for my dearest dad.     

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“I sat beside him as he died.   And now he sits inside my

heart as I live my life, without him but with him.   Love you, Dad,  — Patti.”       

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Love you, gang.

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Dearest Patti’s reminiscences  –“Dad lives in me on the edge of dreams.  He lives in the regrets I carry of my rebellious years and the hurt I caused Dad , which he allowed and blew away like dust.  My sweet memories of Dad keep me afloat.   There was a moment, midway through the Alzheimers which clawed away years, when I was leaving him and I said to Dad, ‘Bye for now, I love you!’   His eyes opened wide in surprise and he said, ‘Well, thank you, thank you so much!’   Dad had no idea who I was.   He was startled and typically gracious about another human being telling him she loved him.   I don’t know if I will ever reach that level of grace, but I’m grateful for having been born to a man who did.   Moments like this revealed what was most essential about Dad — his graciousness, his kindness toward others, his gratitude and his humility.   Dad carried in his pocket a coin which says ‘let go and let God.’   I keep it now in a box on my dresser.   I don’t know where he got it, but I’m guessing someone handed it to him when he was out walking and he looked at the message on it and thought of how lovely it was and how he related to it.   Every day after that, he put it in his pocket — as a blessing, perhaps, to remind him of a stranger’s kindness.  I never stopped believing that he hung the moon, as I remember the nights when I was a child and he traced the constellations for me, showing me Pegasus and Orion.”

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Henry Wadsworth Longfellow:   “Opportunity No Less”   Aging is not dementia but a blessing of a long life lived!

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wisdom and meaning of old age from Henry Wadsworth Longfellow  –

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“Opportunity & Meaning No Less ” –

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For age is opportunity no less,

than youth itself, though in another dress,

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And as the evening twilight fades away,

The sky is filled with stars, invisible by day.

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And as Marc Agronin evokes of Appelfeld’s imagination,

memories of hither and yon take wing & both soothe and

elevate as these ancient memories bring affirmation of the

greatest connections and joys in life — reminiscence’s beauty –

not to restore what has been lost but to experience the gratitude

that can come only with the realization that we never truly lose

the gifts from the most important reference points in our lives.

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http://www.forward.com/articles/144274/

 

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Thornton Wilder:

 The greatest tribute to the dead is not grief but gratitude

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Ellen Howarth:   ‘Tis a Faded Flower   –

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Where is the heart that doth not keep within its inmost core,
some fond remembrance hidden deep of days that are no more –
a faded flower, a broken ring, a tress of my loved one’s hair?

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http://www.bartleby.com/248/504.html

 

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Lesson plans filled with unsettling contempt for others from the holier than thou pharisees scar us all.   As extraordinary sage Steven Kalas born 1957 intones, we desire to love and to be loved beneath our scarred features.

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http://www.lvrj.com/living/what-hurts-most-may-bring-people-closest-together-134200018.html

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The people I know best and with whom I would say I’m the closest all have something in common. I know of their wounds. I know of their losses. It’s the same with people who know me and are close to me. They know the stories behind my psychic, emotional and even physical scars. There is no faster way to know someone but to ask, “Tell me about your life’s greatest loss.”

At the heart of what binds our most treasured, timeless relationships is the knowledge of loss and suffering. Trauma. Injustice. Moral failure. When someone shares these things with us, then and only then can we begin to say we know this person. Then and only then can we say we have a true intimacy.

There is, yet, another echelon of closeness. I refer to people we love, and still love, and with whom we remain close, who have hurt us. And/or we have hurt them. Though, somehow, in this case, the injuries did not extinguish the relationship. This person is still here. Still loving us.

I think of two people in my own life. I see their faces. They love me. Really they do. But, in the history of these relationships, I have behaved badly. In one I abused my power as a bully. In the other I betrayed a trust. And both of these people are still here. Still part of my life. If I think about it too often, it becomes quickly overwhelming.

I think of Thomas. That would be Thomas the disciple of Jesus in the Christian Gospel. It’s Sunday, and, two days ago, Jesus died like a dog. But Thomas’ friends say they have seen Jesus. That he is alive. Thomas scoffed: “Unless I see the mark of the nails in his hands, and put my finger in the mark of the nails and my hand in his side, I will not believe.”

For this line, Thomas went down in history with the moniker “Doubting Thomas,” but I’ve always thought that was unfair. More like “Realistic Thomas.” Jesus doesn’t chastise Thomas for doubting. Instead, Jesus calls his bluff. Jesus shows up again, extends his wounded hands and says, essentially, “You’re on, cowboy. Reach out, see and feel these wounds. Those would be the holes left over from nails.”

“My Lord and my God,” Thomas exclaims.

For my purposes here, my point is not a “religious” one. It’s an existential one. Thomas recognizes Jesus as he knows Jesus’ wounds. The wounds are the ultimate credential of identity. The wounds of which Thomas is not innocent.

I think of my friends who, on their 20th anniversary ask me to preside at their renewal of vows. They gather their children, their family and friends. They stand in their living room and reaffirm the promises of marriage, hope and love. But, see, I know something of the history of this marriage. I know of its joys and celebrations. I know of its wounds. I know of injuries and betrayals. How he has hurt her. How she has hurt him.

Yet, here they stand, telling each other and their Maker of their love, constancy and fidelity. Their hope. Their steadfast willingness to walk the beloved to the grave. And it occurs to me, again, that at the end of 40 to 50 years of healthy marriage, a foundational part of what binds an old man and old woman together is … scar tissue. From which pours not resentment but treasure and blessings. A breathtaking intimacy. A profound knowing. We say: “You see that jagged psychic scar on my beloved’s heart? I did that.”

I presided at the renewal. Then I got out my guitar and sang them the song “Purple Heart”:

Once upon a time you stood before an altar

And you promised not to leave

You held each other’s hand and dreamed a sweet forever

Love drove angels to their knees

Oh, the days they do fly by

Count the tears that you have cried

Count the laughter and the lies

Count your love and times love died

And here you stand together, battle-scarred and torn

The locks of fairy tales have fallen, long since shorn

Love has chosen you, blessed you, crucified you

See what you’ve become

Love’s Purple Heart is won

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Tis’ not “who am I, but TO WHOM am I??”           To whom is puritanical Rev. Doctor of Religion Jeffress [who slammed Mitt Romney for being Mormon]?

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“To whom are you a neighbor?”  Jesus intones.

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“Now which of these three men do you think seemed to be a neighbor to him who fell among the robbers?”

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He said, “He who showed mercy on him.”

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Then Jesus said to him, “Go and do likewise.”

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Luke 10:30-37


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Luke 6:38    –  “give & it will be given …”  –
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faith is not outcome dependent, ergo it is not “cutting a deal,” nor a contract/ bargain/advantage/reward/restoration/trade-off/even-equal exchange  — “given to you” means that God recognizes your unacknowledged act of kindness. with faith in God ensuring everlasting life in God, no matter your pain in our sentient earthly sphere.           
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1 Corinthians 12:22-26  God recognizes your nameless unacknowledged acts of kindness.
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That best portion of a good  man’s life; his little, nameless, unremembered acts of kindness and  love.

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 from William Wordsworth

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from heartful Nani Kyota  –

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The funny thing is that this is something that I have been pondering.  Unfortunately it hasn’t really been on a necessarily “Godly” level.   I have been reading the power and it talks about giving love.  I think with God anything is possible and without him nothing is. I know that when I put him first my day is so much better than when I am rushing and forget what is really important!

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On the faith issue, this is where I stand. I have to say that my knowledge of the Bible isn’t what it should be and so I don’t know if this is actually from the Bible but someone told me once that faith and fear cannot occupy the same space and from that moment I really do not fear. Before that I was scared of so many things, now I just try my best to be my very best and I know that is all that God really expects of us. He loves us no matter what and we should do the same for all of our fellow brothers and sisters.

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for you martial arts followers   –
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There is no ego wishing to aggrandize itself by punishing the opponent and every move is performed effortlessly before one has time to think.   One blocks every move by one’s opponents yet for all parties involved you might be playing with clouds [it’s painless and without harmful consequence].      The essence of Divinity  — fluid and fulfilling.   Not just physical but spiritual,  Imago Dei, in the Image of God.

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Great sage Steven Kalas born 1957 on dealing with psychic/energy vampires   –

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http://www.lvrj.com/view/mom-s-changing-stories-about-money-cause-hurt-confusion-138834794.html

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tightrope dichotomy of trying to be The Observer (detached, staying objective) yet still having the very real human experience of being “driven crazy.”

It is personal when we are conscripted into someone’s crisis of fear and smallness. It is personal to be deliberately moved about the game board of someone’s life as if we were no more than a lesser chess piece in the contest of ego-defense and self-importance.

It hurts to be treated as a means to an end. The hurt is a sign of our health — our self-respect — not a sign that anything about us needs to be fixed.

And yet … it is equally a sign of self-respect that we make an effort to be The Observer. We do this, too, because we love. Despite our hurt and disappointment, we want to try to understand, to attempt to answer the question of what’s really going on here.

I can be in a relationship with you, or I can manage you in relationship. I prefer to do the former. But, if you absolutely insist, you can make me do the latter. I’ll be disappointed, but I’ll do it. Especially if the alternative is being driven crazy.

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Ron Paul’s M.D. money was made in a White homogeneous middle class & upper class society.   Thence, his hypocrisy in not paying for his campaign mgr.’s medical bills on grounds that these creditors shall be paid out of probate –    which mean that the insolvent probate estate will leave the creditors with no recourse.   There is no safety net unless there is  national health insurance, contrary to Paul’s right wing Libertarianism that patients will be taken care of.  

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Libertarianism#Late_twentieth_century

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http://baselinescenario.com/2012/05/11/jp-morgan-debacle-reveals-fatal-flaw-in-federal-reserve-thinking/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+BaselineScenario+%28The+Baseline+Scenario%29

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Jesus makes clear that to forgive is to forget — propitiosity

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“And their sins and iniquities I will remember no more.” Hebrews 10:17

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“God’s way of forgiving is thorough and hearty, -— both to forgive and to forget; and if thine be not so, thou hast no portion of His.”  –Leighton

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Artistic license which results in great movies like “The Last Samurai”  [courage/clean heart/prophecy — anticipate the future]   –

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_a_clef

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Film_%C3%A0_clef

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As faded via spots as is the paint on my car, I am proud of them because an abandoned kitty cat whom I called Brownie [female cat with brown fur] made her home there for the rest of her life.  I am proud to have given Brownie a home and food/water and safety and comfort and joy.   Brownie died of old age and I gaze upon these faded spots on  my car with love and affection for Brownie.

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http://bible.cc/matthew/25-40.htm  [what you do to the least of our world, so do you do this to me]

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http://bible.cc/genesis/50-20.htm   [what others see as faded spots, I see as divine beauty]

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http://bible.cc/2_corinthians/4-7.htm   [treasure of Brownie amid humanity’s treachery in disposing of and betraying Brownie]

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