Energy vamps Croix Bertelmann and George Tidal Brine

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
Hilo’s self-anointed know-it-alls’  Croix Bertelmann St. Louis High ’70 and George Tidal Brine born September 10, 1965  reprise energy vamp[ires] time and again  –
*
*
Decent compassionate folks who try to forge filial/familial bonds with these individuals find themselves quickly depleted of emotion, spirit and vitality.
*
*
~~~~~~It’s  having the life sucked out of you by Count Dracula.~~~~~~~
*
*
Until they are surrounded by a critical mass of folks with consistent boundaries — and by boundaries here I mean an abject refusal to tolerate the absence of reciprocity and the demands of entitlement,  the willingness to surrender these people radically to the consequences of their behaviors — I don’t hold out much hope they will look at themselves. Ever.
*
*
*

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/01/21/how-to-deal-with-selfish-people_n_4494427.html?utm_hp_ref=gps-for-the-soul&ir=GPS+for+the+Soul

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

*

tightrope dichotomy of trying to be The Observer (detached, staying objective) yet still having the very real human experience of being “driven crazy.”

It is personal when we are conscripted into someone’s crises of fear and smallness.

*

It is personal to be deliberately moved about the game board of someone’s life as if we were no more than a lesser chess piece in the contest of ego-defense [fear] and self-importance/arrogance [smallness].

It hurts to be treated as a means to an end. The hurt is a sign of our health — our self-respect — not a sign that anything about us needs to be fixed.

And yet … it is equally a sign of self-respect that we make an effort to be The Observer.

*

We do this, too, because we love.   [Croix & George are incapable to love all but themselves selfishly]

*

Despite our hurt and disappointment, we want to try to understand, to attempt to answer the question of what’s really going on here.

*

http://www.lvrj.com/view/mom-s-changing-stories-about-money-cause-hurt-confusion-138834794.html

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Self-compassion is NOT associated with Croix’ & George Brine’s easy insecure downsides of self-esteem such as ego-defense [fear] and self-importance/arrogance/social comparison/false-imitation-over- pride/narcissism [smallness].

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/kristin-neff/self-compassion_b_843721.html

*

*

Self-compassion recognizes that the human condition is imperfect, so that we desire to feel connected to others when we fail or suffer  [grief/loss]  –   instead of feeling stigmatized or ostracized and separate or isolated.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

http://www.livescience.com/17398-schadenfreude-affirmation.html

*

*

*

*

“When you have low self-esteem, you will do almost anything to feel better, and when you’re confronted with the misfortune of others, you’ll feel schadenfreude [cruel gratification],”  van Dijk told LiveScience.  “In this study, if we give people something to affirm their self, then what we found is they have less schadenfreude — they don’t need the misfortune of others to feel better anymore.”

*

*

“We know that it’s very good  to feel empathy  and sympathy for people, so if you feel schadenfreude without any sympathy or compassion for that other person, that would not be good,”  van Dijk said.     ”Our society thrives on compassion and empathy.”

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

http://www.livescience.com/16650-narcissists-esteem.html

*

*

Narcissists may seem to love themselves, but a new study finds that narcissistic self-aggrandizement may hide deep feelings of inferiority.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*   

*
You wonder just how oblivious, insensitive and narcissistic some people can be. Or maybe that’s redundant. Maybe the grip of narcissism is, by definition, oblivious and insensitive.
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

An overprideful person “swallows one’s own stomach.” Such nature entails endless self-aggrandizement and vanity, and ensures incomprehensibility at the moment it compels authenticity/truth.

*

It is true, the strength behind the leader is the person who mystifies me, the so-called unspoken one, like baby brother Andrew was to Peter [Bible].

*

God has no use for pride, such that the meekest of the meek went on to lead, like Moses/Gideon.

*

Look at King David. Lowly Nathan chastened shell-shocked David. Look at Joshua/etc. All unheralded/unsung heroes. Tremendous symbolism of “never judge a book by its cover.”

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

“NeedToBeTheBest” has always been a cocktail of ego, insecurity, and envy.

*

*

http://www.lvrj.com/blogs/kalas/Sorting_through_excellence_mediocrity_and_the_need_to_be_the_best.html

*

*

the NeedToBeTheBest has NEVER been my friend. 

*

The NeedToBeTheBest is like one of those ‘friends’ Tommy Shaw (Styx) sang about in the song Too Much Time on My Hands:  “I got dozens of friends, as long as I’m buying.”

*

The NeedToBeTheBest is like the Queen’s mirror in Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.

*

Does she seem to you like someone with Inner Peace?

*

Inner Peace is a marriage of self-respect and self-acceptance yielding contentment. 

*

For me, NeedToBeTheBest has always been a cocktail of ego, insecurity, and envy.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
Absolute intolerance is always a sign of uncertainty and panic. Why do you have to hunt down everyone unless you’re weak  [like Croix Bertelmann & George Brine]??   
*
The Vatican doesn’t seem to care if its members’ beliefs are based on faith or fear, conviction or coercion. But what is the quality of a belief that exists simply because it’s enforced?  
   

“To be narrowing the discussion and instilling fear in people seems to be exactly the opposite of what’s called for these days,” says the noted religion writer Kenneth Briggs. “All this foot-stomping just diminishes the church’s credibility even more.”      

This is America. We don’t hunt heresies here. We welcome them. 

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

like energy/psychic vamps Croix & George, so is Wall St. formatted/structured unilaterally to its advantage 

*

http://baselinescenario.com/2012/07/12/the-market-has-spoken-and-it-is-rigged/

*

*   

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Shower a rainbow for others

Exemplars like my personal mentor  — grassroot June Gutmanis 1925-1998  [full-on haole feminist who was castigated by  Hawaiian bigots —  but whose treatises on Hawaiian metaphysics —  Na Pule Kahiko  —     and herbal medicines — Kahuna La’au Lapa’au — are staples/required in coursework today]  —    provide us a deep mirror into the celebration of being human, of reaching into the collective human experience of a culture. And as sagacious Steven Kalas says, the death of a momentous exemplar is felt painfully and powerfully in our human psyche. The loss is real and meaningful. And so is the grief.

*

*

*

The loss becomes even more powerful when the particular exemplar also carries your personal projections. That is, the exemplar’s life mirrors important pieces of your own psychic journey. Your own life dramas. You miss the beauty, the passion, the inspiration and hope that pour through an exemplar and into our lives especially during times of deepest social & financial misery. For this is when we need our exemplar the most. The capacity for gratitude is itself humility. Gratitude and humility are symbiotic. The only people who can say “thank you” are people who have learned of dependence and interdependence. The best of life is not a result of what shortfall we deserve, but the opposite, of simple yet profound indulgences and pleasures — a smile, a tear of joy.

*

*

*

*

*

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Artistic license which results in great movies like “The Last Samurai”  [courage/clean heart/prophecy — anticipate the future]   –

*

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_a_clef

*

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Film_%C3%A0_clef

*

*

*

*

*

The spiritual warrior can be described as an archetype character on a journey for self discovery to benefit others.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warrior_code#Spiritual_warrior

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

great Joseph Campbell [mythology thruout history]  –

*

As the ultimate truth cannot be expressed in plain words, spiritual rituals and stories refer to it through the use of “metaphors,” a term Campbell used heavily and insisted on its proper meaning: In contrast with comparisons, which use the word like, metaphors pretend to a literal interpretation of what they are referring to, as in the sentence “Jesus is the Son of God” rather than “the relationship of man to God is like that of a son to a father.” According to Campbell, the Genesis myth from the Bible ought not be taken as a literal description of historical events happening in our current understanding of time and space, but as a metaphor for the rise of man’s cognitive consciousness as it evolved from a prior animal state.

*

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Campbell#Monomyth

*

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Power_of_Myth

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

I ask myself to make it to tomorrow for life to start anew  — I need to move beyond today’s loss   —-

*

*
*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*
So, how do ruined people pick up and move on again toward a thriving, grateful life?   The first order of business is surrender. We stop railing against the harm.  Somewhere inside of ourselves, we make an authentic peace with the fact that no one is immune to harm. We decide to deeply believe that we waste our lives insisting every scale must be balanced before we are free.
*
Second, in some cases, we walk away from the fight. Yes, we give up. We acknowledge that our naysayer self-important detractor has won and move on to other work, other opportunities to give life a chance.
*
And third, we decide that no one has the power to make life anything less than good.  You might call this decision a decision of Faith.  I am a seminarian and minister by backdrop.
*
*
*
*
*

*

*

*
*
*
That best portion of a good  man’s life; his little, nameless, unremembered acts of kindness and  love.

*

from William Wordsworth

*

*

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/agapi-stassinopoulos/heart-drive_b_1623909.html?utm_hp_ref=daily-brief?utm_source=DailyBrief&utm_campaign=062612&utm_medium=email&utm_content=BlogEntry&utm_term=Daily%20Brief

*

*

*

So, if we don’t address these issues of our hearts, pains, dissatisfactions, lost dreams, separation, wishes and desires, and we pretend that these things don’t matter, then we turn on our mental, ego, and physical drives, and, as a result, our hearts collapse.

*

So, it is imperative that we take time out to listen to our hearts, and find out what is really going on inside, speak our thoughts, voice our emotions and express buried parts that we might have judged that they don’t matter.  

*

So here are my six essentials keys that I see can assist us to reboot our heart drive.

    1. Press the delete button for the old negative thoughts and patterns that undermine you and are no longer contributing to a positive flow of your life.  
    2. [I move beyond today’s loss and ask myself to make it to tomorrow for life to start anew   — with hope and optimism   — Curt]
  • Press the shift button, to shift to feelings of worthiness, joy, creativity, and a sense of belonging.
  • Press the space bar and make room to restore, listen to yourself and give yourself your full attention to what is going on in your heart. Give yourself permission to express whatever is in there.
  • Press pause, and back away from the inner and outer environments that cause you stress.  Fill yourself with the stillness of your presence, which can be extremely effective and nurturing.
  • Release the control button, and leave your heart open and free.
  • Plug into your server. Remember that your server is your source –whether you call it God, the divine, the universe or nature — and is much bigger than you and your life, and that your source has the ability to reboot you, provided you plug in.

It is through listening, attention and willingness to engage in the most vital energy of our lives, our hearts, that that we reboot our heart drives.

*

Vulnerable?     Yes.

*

Rewarding?     Immensely.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

One should  not  feel worthless for being forsaken by another  –

*

The words were a powerful intervention and hapless.    Like stepping out in your front yard to shout down a tornado. The pathos of helplessness.

*

To live well in our grief, we have to forgive ourselves for what was not in our power to do.  

*   

“The luck of the draw.”      — Steven Kalas

*

http://www.lvrj.com/living/relationship-important-part-of-effective-therapy-127085853.html

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*
*
*

The points are to establish love and emotional support as our idyllic commands, in a tragic and indifferent world  –

*

*

*

*

http://www.lvrj.com/living/recognizing-evil-by-its-subtle-destructive-power-141344353.html

*

*

* *

* *

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

http://www.lvrj.com/view/it-s-natural-to-feel-needy-after-a-divorce-130615263.html

*

*

Attending faithfully to grief is what heals grief.   With every honest tear we get stronger.   In this way we are made ready for another chance.   Another hope of great love.

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

*

And, for those kinds of sufferings/losses that can never be entirely healed, to bear it. To find meaning in it.  To turn that suffering into some transformative work in the world.

*

And the truth is this: The human journey includes suffering. No one comes to ask for help who isn’t suffering.

*

*

But, here’s another truth: In any given time in your life, the number of people who actually, really, honestly want and are willing to grant you an engaged and healing audience for your suffering/loss  is      …       small!!     Or nonexistent!!    

*

*

*

*

Even people who sincerely love and adore you might find themselves ambivalent about really engaging and listening to the part of you that suffers. See, the people around us have egos, too. Their egos mobilize to protect them just like your ego does. “Cheer up … get over it … God has a plan … everybody is doing the best he or she can … don’t cry” — the felt motive for these messages is to help you. But each of these messages also contains the anxiety of the messenger:  Please stop bothering and disturbing me by suffering.

And that’s what most modern people do. They try to stop suffering. They “get over it.” They build layer upon layer of pretense and persona over their wounds, because it’s, well, the sociable thing to do. Most of us, then, suffer unconsciously. Because that’s the way we’ve been taught to suffer.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

http://www.lvrj.com/living/9146411.html

*

lot of people don’t want to be present to sadness — their own or anyone else’s. Other people would like to be present to their bereaved friends and family, but don’t know how.

We live in a culture where grief is treated as a disease to be “cured,” or a weakness worthy of shame or self-loathing.

Grief is the holiest of human journeys.

One of my favorite Friedrich Nietzsche quotes is, “Everything holy requires a veil.” Now, modern Americans might think he means that we should keep things covered up because those things are shameful. Nope. He means that some things are so beautiful, so huge, so powerful, so naked, so intimate, that to gaze casually upon them would be injurious to their meaning and value. Injurious ultimately to us.

Grief is such a thing.

I concur with your observation that people around us are largely inept at befriending us in grief. Yet I also encourage people like you to remember to veil (protect and value) their grief. Keep the circle of confidants small. Pick two and no more than five people who will hear the depths of your pain.

There are two ways to read your question at the end. Literally you ask how you might numb the heartache. But I’m guessing you aren’t being literal. In fact, it’s not a question at all, is it? It reads more like an indignation. Like, how dare anyone ask you to numb the heartache! How dare the medical community suggest drugging your bereavement!

See, J.R., you know how precious your sadness is. A breathless, crushing burden, yes. But precious.

J.R., I’ll never have a love of 50 years. You’re the richest woman alive. Your pain is a privilege. Your honor.

Endure, good woman.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Word play:   “for the sake of ” is the opposite of “forsaken”   – 

*

The Wordbook dictionary states that “forsake” is derived from an Old English word “forsacan.”    “for” means “completely” and “sacan” means “deny.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Yes, Stephen Hawking & atheists correctly say that we have only one chance  — our mortal lives — to make a difference for the better for all living things.   Correctly make the best of it.   

*

And that if we happen to be martyrs/exemplars [e.g. Holocaust victims] for the good side of humanity by being disincentives to human barbarism/savagery, at least we take comfort in manifesting the olive branch to avert recurrence of the evil/indifference/selfishness inherent in us all  [olive branch symbolically being Blessed creation of God’s State of Israel].  

*

Life also is a challenge regardless of our evil human condition  –  nature’s calamities beset us all on this earth  — so that Hawking & atheists correctly say to minimize the risks of injury/death via our inherent good cognition and to tough it out as best as we can.    Such risks are facts of life, so to speak.   

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Luke 6:38    –  “give & it will be given to you  …”  –
*
*
*
On a secular level  —  ”of this world,”    –
*
“give”   –  have faith in yourself  —  that you owe  yourself  self-respect   –  is not outcome dependent, ergo it is not “cutting a deal,” nor a contract/ bargain/advantage/reward/restoration/trade-off/even-equal exchange
*
— “given to you” means that you yourself recognize your unacknowledged act of kindness,  no matter your pain in our sentient earthly sphere.          
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
“Hope against hope” is metaphysical   —   needless suffering is of this world    —-
*

*

*

Word play:   “Hope against hope” is a paradox which has Biblical roots  –

*

*

http://bible.cc/romans/4-18.htm

*

*

Who against hope believed in hope,…. Abraham believed the promise of God,

*

that he might become the father of many nations, being assisted by a

*

supernatural aid:  “in hope”;  of the fulfilment of it by the grace and power of

*

God:    “against hope”: against all visible, rational grounds of hope.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

1 Corinthians 1:26-27  —   Remember, dear   brothers and sisters, that few of you were wise in the world’s eyes or   powerful or wealthy when God called you.  

*

Instead, God chose things   the world considers foolish in order to shame those who think they are   wise.  

*

And He chose things that are powerless to shame those who   are powerful, so the same God chose those who reside in the forsaken social   margins.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

1 Corinthians 2:6

–Be not of this world–   [be of the spiritual   dimension, with comfort & solace & companionship with thy   Lord]

*

http://bible.cc/1_corinthians/2-6.htm

*

http://taberstruths.com/not-of-world-bible-verse-live-by/

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*
*
*
*
*
*
*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Needless suffering is of this world, stuck in this indifferent and tragic life

*

*

Indeed, true love endures. It’s just that people need to close the gestalt of being in love with the person who no longer loves you and get through their hurt, bitterness, disappointment and anger before what endures can be apprehended as the honored friend it is (self-respect) and not the cruel enemy it appears to be right after we’ve been dumped by the love of our life.

*

True love endures.   That’s a good thing.

*

But true love is different from   needless suffering   for the rest of your life.

*

At the end of the day, we have to grow a self-respect sufficient not to want someone who doesn’t want us.

*

*

http://www.lvrj.com/view/love-can-endure-if-people-work-through-lost-relationships-144330465.html

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

http://www.lvrj.com/living/25749444.html

*

*

How do you forgive someone who won’t commit to us? Someone who decides to move on in the journey of life and does not return? You’re going to hate this, but, here’s how:

By realizing there is nothing to forgive. There is only your heart to heal. That, and your ego, rent asunder by the answer “no.” But this “no” is not a moral wrong. You can be (and are) anguished, but you have no moral claim. The only work before you is grief. Which is hard work. Which is why we put it off by thinking about whether we can ever forgive.

It would be so much easier to deal with the “no” if we could mobilize righteous anger. And people do commonly mobilize anger when they love someone who doesn’t choose them, but it’s not righteous anger. It’s more like an ego tantrum. Predictable. Understandable. Very human. But hardly righteous.

There is nothing to forgive,  any more than the Beatles need to forgive the record companies that said no — and no and no and no. Why did they say “no”? Because they didn’t say “yes.” Because they decided not to commit to the Beatles. Because they didn’t take the risk. Because they signed other bands instead.

I’m saying it does not, in the end, matter why they said “no.” The only thing that matters is that they said “no.”

And the Four Lads from Liverpool grieved. They felt the pain of “no.” They were tempted to despair. But what they did instead was remarkable. They somehow held on to their commitment to themselves. They would not relinquish their grasp on their beauty, their talent, their worthiness of a recording contract.

Like a mantra, John Lennon would say, “Where we going mates?” And the other three would say: “To the top! To the very top!”

And in 1962, Parlophone Records signed them. Why? Because they did. And the rest is history.

See, “no” doesn’t make us not beautiful. And “yes” doesn’t make us beautiful.

It’s for you to decide, S., whether to take the risk that you are beautiful. Then the rest of the world can decide for itself whether it wants to recognize and value the self you have decided to admire and respect.

The Beatles don’t need to forgive those other record companies. Though it would have been delicious fun, certainly, to see the expressions on the faces of those same executives when, on Feb. 9, 1964, they watched Ed Sullivan say, “Ladies and gentlemen, the Beatles!”

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

http://www.lvrj.com/living/30860474.html

*

But more and more these days I resist the temptation to try to make the great mysteries of the human condition less mysterious.

*

“I think you are going to die not understanding why you and (name) didn’t make it.”

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Remarkable that one’s experiences span a century or more, if one is lucky enough to live into old age.       My uncle Masaaki 1903-1970 was 50 years older than me.    My grandson Silas is 50 years younger than me.    Uncle Masaaki is a century older than Silas.     My life experiences span a century between Uncle Masaaki and my grandson Silas.    Gatz!    Defy Father Time??

*

Of course, one can stretch even longer life’s time span   –   my grandma [Uncle Masaaki’s & my dad’s mama] Tome was 70 years older than me.     I’m just short of age 60, so my lifeblood youngest progeny is my youngest grandchild, my granddaughter Maya, who is 59 years younger than me.     Not equidistant, but 130 years separate my grandma Tome from my granddaughter Maya.     

*

Actor William Demarest 1892-1983 was 60 years older than me, thus meeting the equidistance measure, with my granddaughter Maya being 60 years younger than me — the total span being 120 years from William Demarest [or my uncle Bill Cappy Chun, also born in Demarest’s time] to my granddaughter Maya.      Here is prolific vaudeville/longtime character actor Demarest  –

William Demarest Picture

William Demarest(1892–1983)


Born in St. Paul, Minnesota, William Demarest was a prolific actor in movies and TV, making more than 140 films. Demarest started his acting career in vaudeville and made his way to Broadway. His most famous role was in My Three Sons, replacing a very sick William Frawley. Demarest was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actor in a Supporting role in the real-life biography…See full bio »

Died:

December 28,     1983         (age 91) in        Palm Springs, California, USA

Still of Humphrey Bogart and William Demarest in All Through the NightStill of Humphrey Bogart, Peter Lorre and William Demarest in All Through the Night
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
My parents were 40 years older than me, old enough to be my grandparents.    I am blessed and gifted to have been privy to my parents’ maturity, wisdom, and composure/countenance.
*
*
*
*
*
Local historian Steamy Chow born 1922 is 30 years older than me.      Boxing historian Paul Lou born 1930 is a little over 20 years older than me.    Paul McCartney born 1942 is 10 years older than me.  Role models all!!
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
Point is that life sweeps by in the blink of an eye/snap of a finger!!!
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Here is great entertainer Tony Bennett, 85 years young, who says that life is too short to squander it on overpride/envy/narcissism-vanity/fear-ego defense/anger/greed    –

*

*

Tony Bennett is a prophet, who speaks from a higher order, from God, not one who speaks from us on earth.   He is not of this world, but of Providence/Heaven.   –

*

*

http://transcripts.cnn.com/TRANSCRIPTS/1110/10/pmt.01.html   [no video for this clip]

*

*

Piers MORGAN: How much — how much of your ability to be successful for so long do you think is down to having strong people like your mother in your early life?

*

BENNETT: It meant everything. It meant everything. It meant everything. It gave me the proper, natural human love, and it worked.

*

MORGAN: Let’s take another break. I want to come back and talk to you about politics, about when you marched back in the ’60s, the Civil Rights marches, Martin Luther King, the Kennedys and indeed President Obama today. Let’s hear what your thoughts about it.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

*

MORGAN: Well, that was your theme tune, isn’t it, really, “I Left My Heart in San Francisco?”

*

BENNETT: That’s my signature song.

*

MORGAN: Yes. Do you ever get tired of singing it?

*

BENNETT: No, not at all. That’s a beautiful song and it’s a magnificent city in the United States.

*

MORGAN: If you had five minutes to live, what song would you sing?

*

BENNETT: I’d sing the last line of that song.

*

MORGAN: Would you?

*

BENNETT: “Your golden sun will shine for me.”

*

MORGAN: Yes, great line. And that would be —

*

BENNETT: “When I come home to you, San Francisco, your golden sun will shine for me.”

*

Because it’s not just about the city.

*

It’s about every optimistic person on the planet. We all love to be optimistic. We are instinctively optimistic. And that song says it.

*

Everybody has a dream and a hope that something’s going to work for them. And then when it happens, it’s a great joy.

*

MORGAN: In the ’60s, you became involved in the American Civil rights movement. You participate in the ’68 Selma to Montgomery marches. Did you think then when Martin Luther King was assassinated, did you think in your lifetime, you would see a black president in America?

*

BENNETT: I think it’s the greatest accomplishment that the United States ever came up with. I think it’s magnificent. Because he’s not only an African-American, but he’s — you know, I’ve always respected intellectual people. And he’s an intellect.

*

MORGAN: He’s intelligent.

*

BENNETT: He’s highly — he’s more than intelligent. He’s very bright. Highly bright. And I love the fact that this great country — it’s a great step for humanity, for the world to learn that even though I love this country more than anything that could ever happen, it’s kind of ahead of all the other countries, because instead of one philosophy, it has many. It has a great palette to choose from. From every society and every religion. That only happens in the United States.

*

MORGAN: It was very courageous of you to do what you did personally in the ’60s, to go on those marches. It was a contentious thing to do. What was driving you at the time?

*

BENNETT: It’s a dream of mine that someday the world will pick themselves up by their boot straps and better themselves, walk toward humanity, realize what a gift it is to be alive and to be on this planet. What a gift it is that we’re alive.

*

MORGAN: How important for you in forming your character was fighting in the war? Because you saw some pretty heavy action. I mean, you were involved in the famous Battle of the Bulge, across France to Germany and the U.S. army from November 1944. You know, when I talk to people from that era, they always say that when you go to war, the stuff you experience, it shapes your character forever. And it gives you a sense of perspective on life that nothing else can. Was that — was that how you felt?

*

BENNETT: Well, yes. It taught me — personally, it taught me that fighting, killing someone is the lowest form of human behavior.

*

MORGAN: But do you feel that war is ever justified?

*

BENNETT: Well —

*

MORGAN: I mean, when the allies took on the Nazis, when Adolf Hitler was trying to take over the world, and was clearly an evil man, is it not an imperative to then defend yourselves against someone like him? With all the collateral damage that comes?

*

BENNETT: It’s a very difficult question, because I think we should have a society of highly educated, intelligent people that will think realistically about how to do things.

*

~~~~““When I said to you earlier that the lowest form of nature is to kill someone –it’s the lowest form of humanity. It’s the bottom of the line.““~~~~~

*

~~~~““So we’re actually intellectual cavemen at this point. No matter how much technical things we work out, we’re still fighting.““~~~~~

*

““““And it’s my dream that someday we’ll find out or everybody will learn that — what a gift it is to be alive and how we should cherish one another and appreciate one another. ““““

*

MORGAN: You ran into trouble with Howard Stern. And you’re not the first to do that, by the way. So –

*

T. BENNETT: On a daily basis.

*

MORGAN: You ran into trouble. You made comments that, on the face of it, seemed quite inflammatory about 9/11 and so on. Was that really the point you were making?

*

T. BENNETT: Yes.

*

MORGAN: Is it really — if — you have to value life higher than everyone in the modern world appears to be valuing it. All governments appear to be involved in some kind of conflict, war, whatever.

*

T. BENNETT: Oh, gosh. Understand that we’re all on this planet and we only have one quick life.

*

It’s only a hundred years.

*

“““If we’re lucky, we live a hundred years.“““

*

“““We should realize what a gift that is to be alive!!“““`

*

MORGAN: What does it mean to you to be an American?

*

T. BENNETT: Well, America — to be an American is you’re ahead of everybody on the planet. It’s the first country where it’s not one philosophy but many, many philosophies. And it’s one of the things that we should celebrate, the fact that all different religions, every different nationality. And we should cherish the best of every religion and every nationality. We should — we should cherish it. And it’s much more creative to live that way than to have one philosophy, and this is how we do it. With all the other countries, that’s the way it is.

*

MORGAN: It’s strange to think there are lots of people out there that would actually directly oppose that kind of ambition. And they do. And it’s a sad reflection of —

*

T. BENNETT: It’s a matter of education.

*

MORGAN: Yes, I think you’re right. I think you’re right. I think if the money that was put into warfare was put into education –

*

T. BENNETT: Oh, boy. MORGAN: — around the world, it would a very different world, right?

*

T. BENNETT: Absolutely.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

And here is the video which leads to Tony Bennett’s magnanimous manifesto on the shortness of our time in this life & the need to make this time worthwhile for ourselves and for others    –

*

*

http://piersmorgan.blogs.cnn.com/2011/10/11/clips-from-last-night-tony-bennett-opens-up-about-his-drug-use-obama/

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

* think and feel positive [like octogenarian Tony Bennett]!!            –

*

http://pushingsocial.com/the-piers-morgan-vs-tony-robbins-showdown-and-the-lesson-it-teaches-about-blogging/

*

Piers Morgan had his hands full.

Across from him sat the king of self-help, Anthony “Tony” Robbins.  Tony’s 6′ 7″ frame was folded into his chair and 110% of his energy was directed at Piers.

A bit shaken, Piers started with softball questions about Tony’s childhood.  Robbins absorbed the question and segued into his favorite topic – helping people achieve their potential.

Stymied, Piers focused on the abuse in Tony’s childhood.

Tony smiled and explained how the abuse in his childhood trained him to be a “Practical Psychologist”.  He went on to show how he used this tough training to help a quadriplegic learn to love life and his wife again.

Piers tried again with an edgy question about the role of government and what it should be doing for American citizens.

Again, Tony deftly redirected the question into a 5-point checklist on the promise of government and its opportunity to make a difference. 

Piers had met his match.

You see, Piers Morgan’s job relies on a healthy dose of skepticism.  His brand is built on asking the hard uncomfortable questions.  CNN needs him to deliver the edgy interviews that accentuates the negative.  This is what the public wants and this is what Piers is paid to give.

If Piers Morgan penned a daily blog, I imagine it would be filled with cynical analysis of our leaders and a dubious outlook for our society.  I’m sure he would get attention in the short-term, but I doubt he would be our long-term hero.    Look at CNN’s ratings.

*

Tony doesn’t rant.  He doesn’t attack his peers in thinly veiled opinion posts.  He just invests in people and helps them overcome the challenges in their lives.

Tony’s secret sauce is unbridled optimism.

Optimism – Is Exactly What Your Readers Need

If you solve problems then you need to bear-hug optimism.

Optimism puts pep in your message and attracts readers to your spirit.  Optimism gives your blog a glow that outshines the others who focus on the short-term attention offered by cynicism.

It’s hard to keep optimism at the core of your blog.  You’ll want to shout, rant and rave at the injustices around you.  It will be difficult to ignore the call of righteous indignation, but you must.

Your readers need to know that they get a healthy dose of empowerment from your blog.  Your readers should be able to bet on your unflinching resolve to be optimistic.

*

One Simple Optimistic Tip

What do you believe in?  What are your core values?

Look at your list.  Is their at least one value that focuses on affirming and empowering others with raw unabashed optimism?

Are you empowering your readers?  Which side of the interview table are you on – Piers or Tony’s?

Love to hear what you think about this.  You know what to do.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Irony, reversal, and frustration of expectations illustrate opposites or impossibilities which tie in knots our social conventions.     Not just Biblical Parables but also the  Beatitudes feature counterintuitively the dramatic presentation and reversal of expectations that are characteristic of Christ  e.g. — Love thy enemy  — What kind of neighbor are You to the new folks next door? — Turn the other cheek.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

What Jesus prescribes in the samaritan parable  of Matthew 25:40 is disinterested, self-giving care for the “other” [agape]. We are to act on behalf of those who have needs and who reside along the social margins [the hungry, the stranger, the naked, the sick, and the imprisoned].

*
This is to say, it is the acceptance of God’s grace and atoning spirit that compel us to look beyond ourselves to help those in need just as Christ did for us.

*

This latter point is important because all too often we separate Martin Luther King, Jr.’s love notion from the Christian faith. Surely King was informed by varying philosophical and religious principles, which included Gandhian satyagraha [love force], Hindu and Buddhist ahimsa [non-violence], and Henry David Thoreau’s theory of civil disobedience. But King’s view of Christian salvation was tied to social justice.  Christians have been saved [soterion] and set apart [ekklesia] for a particular purpose which is found in Micah 6:8, “to do justice, and to love mercy, and to walk humbly with your God.” This is why King adopted the slogan “Redeeming the Soul of America” for his civil rights organization, the Southern Christian Leadership Coalition. King believed that the quest for civil and human rights for all of humanity, particularly the most vulnerable, were integral to the Christian mission and evidence of human redemption.”
*
*
*
*
On the momentous issue of irony,  chastened puritanical KingLit Ching born 1936 imparts –
*
This is a very enlightening discourse that gives me a better understanding of Christianity and what is in God’s mind.  I have always had difficulty relating to what captured the imagination and souls of the early Christians who were converted by the Apostle Paul.  I can better relate to Christ’s parables that carried simple messages to simple uneducated people.  These people were “empowered” (mesmerized?) by these radical  messages who previously saw their lot in life as useless and without purpose.  They were suddenly recognized as individuals by a personal caring God. I see your point of Christ using “irony” in his parables.    –Regards,  KL
*
Turning common-sense ideas upside down, confounding the expectations of His audience: He/Jesus preached of “Heaven’s imperial rule” [traditionally translated as “Kingdom of God“] as being already present but unseen; He depicts God as a loving father; He squares shoulders with outsiders and criticizes insiders.   Christ evokes not simply an apocalyptic eschatology/end-time, but more critically a sapiential eschatology, which encourages all of God’s children to repair the world.     Since Christ lived and preached in an oral culture, scholars expect that short, memorable stories or phrases are more likely to be historical and factual.

*

Irony:   Based on several important narrative parables [such as the Parable of the Good Samaritan], scholars decided that irony, reversal, and frustration of expectations were characteristic of Christ’s style.  
*
Does a pericope/concise passage illustrate opposites or impossibilities?   If it does, it’s more likely to be authentic.   For example, “love your enemies.”    
*
Not just the Parables but the  beatitudes feature the dramatic presentation and reversal of expectations that are characteristic of Christ. 
*
The poor are accepted as constituting the primary recipients of the Good News and, therefore, as having an inherent capacity of understanding it better than anyone else.
*
That’s pretty threatening for any comfortable Christian.
*
For not only do we have to help the poor, not only do we have to advocate on their behalf, we also have to see them as perhaps understanding God better than we do! 
*
But that’s not a new idea:  It goes back to Jesus.
*
The poor, the sick and the outcast “got” him better than the wealthy did.  
*
Perhaps because there was less standing between the poor and God.   Less stuff [pride].  
*
Maybe that’s why Jesus said in the Gospel of Matthew, “You will have treasure in heaven, and follow me.”
*
Like I said, pretty disturbing, then and now.
*
It’s hardly “the opposite of the Gospel,” as ousted Fox News pundit Glenn Beck said.
*
*

*

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

On real time forgiveness, note the instance of the man who accidentally spills a bowl of  chicken soup on another man.   The other man is aghast, then lets out the amazing Grace of a punchline   –  “Well, at least I love the comforting sense & aroma of chicken soup!!”   Wow!!

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Jesus always embraced the reproached, the outcasts, of society, knowing that these imperfect ones had a closer affinity with God, more so than the overproud sentients full of contemptuous opinions and

scathing comments vs. others. To Jesus, imperfection is beautiful, as we grow in God’s Holiness. His Holiness, is not outcome dependent for us on earth.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Jesus makes clear that to forgive is to forget — propitiosity  –

“And their sins and iniquities I will remember no more.”    Hebrews 10:17

*

*

“God’s way of forgiving is thorough and hearty, -— both to forgive and to forget; and if thine be not so, thou hast no portion of His.”    –Leighton

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

–   reared and nurtured in love, respect, constancy, regard and the warmth of people who cherish one another — redemptive healing  –  communicate, share, negotiate, listen, learn, tolerate, understand, compromise and reconcile.    Beautiful images from Steven Kalas.  

*

*

My sempai [older leader/mentor] June Gutmanis 1925-1998 [died same time as my Mom] suffused tremendous empathy/compassion/love/generosity/humbleness & patience/temperance, with almighty application-application-application of metaphysical self-respect to secularity — indifference/tragedy of this life, unlike pulpiteer Earl Dean Edmounson born 1945, who preaches like no tomorrow about his perfect marriage to his dearest wife.   Give a lick about application of Gospel to life predicaments/challenges??!     Sheez…   :-0

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*
*
*
*

*

*

*
*
*

*

*

*

Life in a crumpled paper sack   [pathos]   –

*

*

http://www.lvrj.com/living/clap-your-hands-for-advocates-who-stand-by-us-in-our-shame-160159705.html

*

*

*

*

Perhaps there is no more sublime work in human relationships than advocacy. From the Latin “vocare,” meaning “to call.”

*

“To call” on one’s inner/core being is the mark of great respect for oneself  [self-respect] and for another living creature [empathy/compassion].   “I’ve got your back,” or, “I will never throw you under the bus.”    I call on my core being –  “vocare.”

*

Meaning, join the rest of us – and that would be all of us – who have unlovely [as well as lovely] chapters in our lives.        Everyone has a life hidden in a crumpled paper sack.      All I need to do is remember the times I hold my own life in a crumpled paper sack.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*
*
The National Enquirer says, “For inquiring minds.” But they mean prurient minds, and in some cases sadistic curiosity.
*
I mean that, once the unlovely story is told, I find that I don’t keep track of the unlovely story. When, by chance, I should cross paths with former acquaintances years later, I’m not focused on the mistakes and failures. I often don’t remember them. What I celebrate is the courageous way patients have embraced those unlovely events and turned them into redemption, humility, creativity, gratitude, and commitments to live with integrity and meaning.
*
*
*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

http://www.lvrj.com/view/hope-can-carry-victims-beyond-pain-to-survival-148633715.html

*

*

*

I have always said that there is a trajectory of hope from victim to survivor to hero.

*

It is all a question of where we finally invest a healthy, thriving identity. The hero has embraced the past, survived it.

*

The hero does not deny or discard these memories but integrates them, redeems them in service to benevolence, freedom and living well.

*

Which reminds me of our last speaker at Holocaust Studies, a Jewish man in his 80s. He tells the story of watching his parents murdered. Of bombs and gunshots and bodies on the street. Of the miracle of his escape from Germany to the United States.

*

On his first day of school, American kids throw rocks at him because he’s Jewish.

*

His smile comes from a deep and authentic place in his soul, lighting the room ablaze.

*

“So,” he says, “I decided to become an optimist!” That guy is a victim. And he’s a survivor.

*

And he’s my hero.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anxiety#Existential_anxiety

*

*

*

The tone of Man’s Search for Meaning is like this throughout: the reasonable, detached observer describing not only the radical evil around him but radical absurdity, stripped of everything “except, literally, our naked existence.” The effect is to connect life at Auschwitz with life anywhere.

We needed to stop asking ourselves about the meaning of life, and instead to think of ourselves as those who were being questioned by life –  daily and hourly. . . . Therefore, it was necessary for us to face up to the full amount of suffering, trying to keep moments of weakness and furtive tears to a minimum. But there was no need to be ashamed of tears, for tears bore witness that a man had the greatest of courage –

THE COURAGE TO SUFFER.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Man%27s_Search_for_Meaning#Experiences_in_a_concentration_camp

*

*

Frankl concludes from his experience that a prisoner’s psychological reactions are not solely the result of the conditions of his life,

*

but also from the freedom of choice he always has even in severe suffering.

*

*

The inner hold a prisoner has on his spiritual self relies on having a hope in the future, and that once a prisoner loses that hope,

*

he is doomed!!!

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

http://www.goodreads.com/author/quotes/7128.Jodi_Picoult

*

*

*

“Let me tell you this: if you meet a loner, no matter what they tell you, it’s not because they enjoy solitude. It’s because they have tried to blend into the world before, and people continue to disappoint them.”  ―    Jodi Picoult

*

*

*

“I’m lonely. Why do you think I had to learn to act so independent?”     –   ―    Jodi Picoult

*

*

*

“Love is not an equation, it is not a contract, and it is not a happy ending. Love is the slate under the chalk, the ground that buildings rise, and the oxygen in the air. It is the place you come back to, no matter where you’re headed.”  ―    Jodi Picoult

*

*

*

“If you spent your life concentrating on what everyone else thought of you, would you forget who you really were? What if the face you showed the world turned out to be a mask… with nothing beneath it?”  ―    Jodi Picoult

*

*

*

“A real friend isn’t capable of feeling sorry for you, [but instead feeling sorry for/loss of you by the other person.]”  ―    Jodi Picoult

*

*

*

“I didn’t want to see her because it would make me feel better. I came because without her, it’s hard to remember who I am.”  ―    Jodi Picoult

*

*

*

“People always say that, when you love someone, nothing in the world matters. But that’s not true, is it? You know, and I know, that when you love someone, everything in the world matters a little bit more!”  ―    Jodi Picoult

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*
*
*
*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

http://www.lvrj.com/living/theology-differs-but-we-mesh-on-truths-of-human-finitude-152194005.html

*

*

And then, right there in the introduction, Walsch did the one thing that always buys credibility in my company. He revealed an abject humility:

“I need now to say that I am deeply embarrassed by my own life, which has been marked by continued mistakes and misdeeds, some very shameful behaviors, and some choices and decisions which I’m certain others consider hurtful and unforgivable. Though I have profound remorse that it was through others’ pain, I am unspeakably grateful for all that I have learned, and found that I have still yet to learn, because of the people in my life. I apologize to everybody for the slowness of that learning. Yet I am encouraged by God to grant myself forgiveness for my failings and not to live in fear and guilt but to always keep trying – keep on trying – to live a grander vision. I know that’s what God wants for all of us.”

That little speech is all I need to know that Walsch and I could talk. Could be colleagues and perhaps friends. That, whatever we agreed or disagreed about theologically, however different was our spiritual practice, we could embrace each other in the universal truths of human finitude, folly and brokenness. Because Walsch “gets” that, I could trust him to be a human being, and trust that he won’t pretend to be anything else.

This is a defining theme for me in intimate relationships. If I can’t trust this in you, we’re not close.

If I ever meet Neale Donald Walsch, I wonder if he would find it ironic that that one introductory paragraph is my favorite part of the entire book. That I have it near memorized. That I wake up every morning with that same confession in my mouth. I intend to recite it from my hospice bed.

To some, the confession might sound negative. A real downer. To me, the confession is light and liberation.

*

Because it’s the truth about me.

*

And about you.

*

And the truth sets us free.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Mercy is a sublime human virtue. Becoming human means putting a bridle on the animal instinct to attack vulnerability. It means that, when our antagonist has dropped his sword and shield, bows before us and asks for another chance, we give a “thumbs up.” We allow sincere remorse to gentle us instead of provoke us to increased aggression.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

The word “Sublime”  especially refers to a greatness beyond all possibility of calculation, measurement or imitation.     Luke 18:31 -19:10

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*
*
*

*

*

*

*

*

*
*
*
*
*
*

*

*

*
*
*
*
*

Contempo existentialism postulates that one must make his and her own values in an indifferent world. One can live meaningfully [free of despair and anxiety] in an unconditional commitment to something finite, and devotes that meaningful life to the commitment, despite the external vulnerability inherent to doing so. I love history. I love life. My existential definition lies right here, right at this instant.   Where am I?  Here.  What time is it?   Now. 

*

*

*

*

Irony is I have no history  –  purged via rejection/elimination  –  forsaken & forgotten   – 

*
*
*
*
*
We’re here to love and be loved.
*
That’s it.
*
Every other dimension of life — job, money, golf game, emptying the kitchen trash — is only important as it serves the end of how and why you are related to another soul. 
*
I know this because I spent years working for hospice.
*
Dying people never revel in how often they vacuumed.
*
They revel in who they became in meaningful relationships  [life- & soulmates]!

*

http://www.lvrj.com/living/gestalt-therapy-can-open-doors-to-more-authentic-life-118731604.html

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*
*
Egotistic overpride/vanity are humanity’s most pervasive pernicious sins, and interlaced with these are envy/jealousy [that pride is an entitlement, not a luck of the draw, pleasant or unpleasant] and anger [when I don’t receive/realize such entitlement].    The cures are submission/humbleness [vs. overpride/vanity], acceptance of one’s fate [compassion/empathy vs. envy/jealousy], & obedience [patience vs. anger].   Lust/greed [arrogance] also are interlaced with overpride/vanity.
*
*
*

*

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Eastern religion is about release from suffering,  Christianity is about release from sin, & Islam is about release from self-centeredness [obedience to Allah].    Eastern thought:  End suffering, find relief or peace.   Christian thought:  End sin,  find salvation.   Islam thought:   End selfish pride, find acceptance of and obedience to Allah.   Eastern process:  Eventual metamorphosis away from earthly misery via reincarnation/cyclical existences.    Western [Christian/Islam] process:    One-time shot at salvation/obedience  — linearity from mortal birth to mortal death.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*
*
*
*
Assembly of God pulpiteer and former Wales native Robert Owen born 1924 loves camaraderie at my expense of a costly steak meal for free for him.   Yet, his humongous mountain of an ego even surpasses his gluttony and most crucially the rock mountain which my great hero super-sandaled Biblical Caleb overcame as testament to Caleb’s Faith in God.
*
*
“Therefore I take pleasure in infirmities, in reproaches, in necessities, in persecutions, in distresses for Christ’s sake: for when I am weak, then am I strong.”  2 Corinthians 12:10 
*
*
Pastor Robert Owen brazenly is so full of himself [pundit Earl Dean Edmoundson’s peer/preacher] .   Pastor Robert Owen  [like Guenni Jack Mormon born March 1952] misses Biblical Caleb’s point — God Almighty, not Robert Owen Almighty.
*
*
*
Pastor Robert Owen is King Sisyphus  –
*
As a punishment from the gods for his trickery King Sisyphus was made to roll a huge boulder up a steep hill. Before he could reach the top, however, the massive stone would always roll back down, forcing him to begin again. The maddening nature of the punishment was reserved for King Sisyphus due to his hubristic belief that his cleverness surpassed that of Zeus Himself.   Zeus accordingly displayed his own cleverness by consigning Sisyphus to an eternity of useless efforts and unending frustration. Thus it came to pass that pointless and/or interminable activities are sometimes described as Sisyphean.
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
Especially those who come from our outer social margins enormously and beautifully exude that there is more than enough love to go around, that empathy/compassion/beneficence/trust/hope/gratitude/humility are God’s felt necessities.   Sharing is as natural as breathing.   Second nature.  
*
*
To the person giving of oneself,  such person has another wondrous opportunity to become even more self-fulfilled,  as the receiver derives benefit/sustenance/love.   I have experienced personally the magnanimity of altruists on the edges of society who give so unconditionally of themselves and of their meager austere possessions.     And the incredulity of abject parsimony on the part of our patricians/pharisees so utterly ”full of themselves”/mammon such as pulpiteer Robert Owen.    Huli’au/upside down [confounds one’s sense of love/compassion]!!    
*
*
Dearest kindred soul Pi’ehu Iaukea 1855-1940 impels upon us all that love/patience/kindness/humbleness/generosity of spirit do not and never should have social boundaries.
*
*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Great religious figures invoke the most important precepts, especially amid our trials & tribulations.   As tremendous observer Steven Kalas born 1957 chastens,  we bear with suffering by finding meaning in it, as we turn suffering into transformative good in the world.   Sublime Grace [for religious folks   —  uplift from God].

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

http://www.lvrj.com/living/appropriate-self-respect-can-lift-all-areas-of-life-118320899.html

*

My passion also is theological. In my religious heritage, the baptismal vows come to this crescendo: Celebrant: “Will you respect the dignity of every human being?” People: “I will, with God’s help.” It always nails my soul to the floor. Respect, from the Latin respectus, meaning “to see again.” Dignity, from the Latin digne, meaning “the breath of God.” In other words, if you’re breathing, that’s the only credential you need to rightly claim that I treat you respectfully.

*

Self-respect fundamentally changes our motives for living our values. Take fidelity in marriage, for example. There are a wide variety of motives we might deploy as we live out the promise of not having sex with folks other than our spouse. We might want to be “good.” We might see fidelity as the necessary sacrifice required to derive the benefits of marriage. Commonly, we understand fidelity as a promise made to our spouse, and therefore a gift to the spouse: “Isn’t this nice of me, honey, not to have sex with other people?”

*

But, watch what happens when you take your motives for fidelity and “rewire” them to self-respect. Suddenly, fidelity is not first a promise made to your mate; rather, a promise made to yourself. It’s not first a gift to your mate, but a gift to oneself.

*

It makes you into the husband/wife you most respect. Suddenly, living your values becomes strangely mercenary, and, I would argue, eminently more powerful.

*

A warning:   there’s a downside, a real tricky balance in the work of self-respect. I have learned to nurture a healthy suspicion when I become too strident, too righteous about that value.

*

There’s a line between self-respect and self-important/arrogant pride. It’s a fine line. Easy to cross. Way too easy for me, anyway. And I cross it at my own peril.

*

When the human ego conscripts the language, the work and the mantle of self-respect, you start to feel really good and right about discarding people from your life.

*

And then you can know that you were right, because you don’t have any friends at all.

*

Self-respect and self-importance — not the same at all. But they can feel the same.

*

Why can’t I be like you or in sync with you?    Because then there would be no need for a me, just you and you alone.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

http://www.lvrj.com/living/lifes-journey-includes-pain-of-suffering-69506497.html

*

*

*

Authentic introspection doesn’t explain suffering. It courageously acknowledges it. “Life is suffering,” said the Buddha (The Four Noble Truths). “Pick up your cross and follow me,” said Jesus. “If I make my bed in hell, thou art there,” said the Hebrew psalmist. And once acknowledged, introspection encounters  suffering in a way that leads to hope and meaning.

The Romans gave us two words for suffering: patior, which means “to endure, to allow,” and suffero, or “to bear up.” The Greeks gave us pascho, or “to experience.” It intrigues me that none of these three words bespeak of pain, per se. All three words have in common an intention and willingness to be radically open and present to life as life is — joyous or sorrowful, delightful or painful.

The central thing we suffer is not physical or emotional pain, but loss.   In the midst of illness, tragedy, death — in the midst of life! — meaning is threatened, along with our sense of hope, safety and security. Our belief in a well-ordered and benevolent universe is challenged by deadly weather, accidents, evil and DNA molecules run amok. Saints and scoundrels alike experience absurd, chaotic, inexplicable suffering.

We don’t get to choose whether we suffer, or always what we must suffer. But, thankfully, we do have some freedom to choose how we suffer, and to what end.

Ego suffering refers to the pain and problems resulting from the ego’s refusal to acknowledge pain and problems. We cannot encounter suffering creatively, precisely because the ego will not encounter suffering at all. Oh, the ego will bemoan it. Wail and dramatize. But not encounter.

Indeed, most of what we call suffering comes into our lives as a consequence of our refusal to suffer. We suffer estrangement and isolation because we refuse to suffer the joys and the pains of intimacy. We suffer addictions to avoid suffering the pain within our souls. We suffer depression because we cannot suffer our anger or grief. We suffer guilt because we will not suffer the humility of asking for and accepting forgiveness.

We suffer because we refuse to suffer.

Transformative suffering refers to a conscious encounter with pain powered by the hope of emerging meaning and human transformation. It must be emphasized that the difference between ego suffering and transformative suffering is not found in the suffering itself, but in our relationship to the suffering. In how we suffer. In and of itself, pain is neither a moral good nor moral evil. That we are in pain does not necessarily indicate anything about us. At all. What we do with and in our pain: This may point to character.

Do you have some suffering to do? Here are a few things to remember:

Let the mystery of suffering be the mystery.

Our temptation is to reduce the suffering to something less chaotic and more intellectually manageable. “There must be a reason,” we protest. And so we construct reasons. Often the reasons make us even more miserable.

Share the suffering.

The opportunity to tell the story of our suffering to a compassionate and skillful listener is helpful beyond measure. Simply in the telling and retelling, we begin to shift perspective, to put a healing distance between us and the pain.

Turn to the wisdom of symbol and ritual.

Medals of honor, funerals, statues and monuments, ritual mourning, legacy, keepsakes — we are symbolic creatures, and our symbols help us to embrace and transcend our suffering.

Discover redemptive mission.

Many people discover meaning in suffering as they work to redeem their suffering in service to the world. And so the alcoholic becomes an AA sponsor. The mother whose child is killed by a drunken driver becomes an activist with Mothers Against Drunk Driving. The mercenary becomes a naturalist. The victim of child abuse becomes a marriage and family counselor. And so it goes.

Turn suffering to witness.

Sometimes we suffer as a testimony against injustice. We decide to suffer as a way of absorbing the cost of hatred and bearing witness against the insanity of revenge. Or sometimes we willingly suffer for the sake of endurance alone. That is, as a witness to the goodness of life.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

Redemptive suffering means to grace/forgive a plight/fate/person for your self-sufferance which averts another person from suffering, typified by Scripture’s Hath No Greater Love than to Lay Down One’s Life for Another. John 15:13

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Traditional Catholicism’s redemptive suffering about punishment and more punishment wholly is off the mark. This is the Vatican’s spool to rope you in for indulgences/money. Its golden rule is whoever has the gold rules, straight from our Pontiff’s pulpit.

*

Dostoevsky dives into the dual nature of suffering — orthodox Catholic punishment, and Dostoevsky’s Sonya as the whore/saint who suffers because of and for others, and thus becomes most Christ-like as Sonya Grows in His Holiness, no matter her social standing/economic status on our mortal plane.

*

Magnanimous Viktor Frankl’s exemplar of the old man who finally realizes that his suffering the loss of his lifelong dearest companion wife allows her not to suffer if her husband had died before her — releases this husband from his misery and pain of losing his wife. He suffers because of and for his departed wife, and such suffering finally is accepted with tremendous equanimity by the heretofore tormented husband.     Redemptive suffering.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

To address the question of redemptive suffering,  here is great teacher Viktor Frankl,  Holocaust survivor and the genesis of the pschotherapy/philosophical school of  “The Will to Meaning in Life.”   –
*

According to Frankl, “We can discover this meaning in life in three different ways:  (1) by creating a work or doing a deed;  (2) by experiencing something or encountering someone; and (3) by the attitude we take toward unavoidable suffering,”  and that “everything can be taken from a person but one thing:   The last of the human freedoms—to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances.”   On the meaning of suffering, Frankl gives the following example:

Once, an elderly general practitioner consulted me because of his severe depression. He could not overcome the loss of his wife who had died two years before and whom he had loved above all else. Now how could I help him? What should I tell him? I refrained from telling him anything, but instead confronted him with a question, “What would have happened, Doctor, if you had died first, and your wife would have had to survive you?” “Oh,” he said, “for her this would have been terrible; how she would have suffered!” Whereupon I replied, “You see, Doctor, such a suffering has been spared her, and it is you who have spared her this suffering; but now, you have to pay for it by surviving and mourning her.” He said no word but shook my hand and calmly left the office.
— Viktor Frankl
*
*

Frankl emphasized that realizing the value of suffering is meaningful only when the first two creative possibilities are not available [for example, in a concentration camp] and only when such suffering is inevitable – he was not proposing that people suffer unnecessarily.

*

*

*

*

And on redemptive suffering as Irony, note the understandable sentient self-lamentation of Earl Dean Edmoundson born 1945 .

*

Need I mutter exemplar ergo impossible irony???  — Patton’s feared foe Rommel orders dossier on Patton — Rommel’s aide spills nonsense [schooling/creds/awards] – Rommel exclaims, “The Man — who is Patton!!??”  Aide meekly recounts, “Well, Patton swears all the time — but he prays to God at night.”   Rommel convulses, “Oh my God, such a conflicted man!!  He has nothing to lose!!  I must destroy Patton before he destroys me!!”    Macho males would revulse at a prayin’ man, dismissing a prayin’ man as a pussy/panty-arse.   Not so amid the deepest unction of irony!!   As to “turn the other cheek” & “when you give, it is given to you???”

*

Biblical pundit Dean Edmoundson of Honomu [Ishigo Bakery] painted for free his brethren’s church in Puna — didn’t even get a common courtesy thank you from its pastor — and subsequently Dean fumed and steamed for a week over such idiotic disregard of Dean’s “giving”  — well, as Jesus would have it, Dean’s wife June [the strength in the household] comforted Dean & intoned that God works in mysterious ways  — “turn the other cheek” by forgiving the so-called insolent pastor, and Dean’s “giving” is not in vain because Jesus rejoices at Dean’s unction/giving spirit, as do the Puna congregation members [Dean is a head deacon at the Honomu Living Waters Church 40 miles northbound]  — and as June so lovingly evokes, maybe God meant for Dean not to get a thank you from the Puna pastor — to test Dean’s strength of belief in God — that when you give, don’t “be of this world,” i.e,. the blessing is that you give for your love of God, not to get a thank you “of this earth.”   And maybe, even maybe, the Puna pastor tested Dean’s strength by looking “to see”  if Dean would end up sore & hurt incessantly.   Maybe?!   Only God knows.   Children of God — innocent in Jesus’ eyes.    See how irony cuts “right to the chase,” so to speak??

*
*
*
Reprise 1 Corinthians 1:26-27  —  Remember, dear brothers and sisters, that few of you were wise in the world’s eyes or powerful or wealthy when God called you.   Instead, God chose things the world considers foolish in order to shame those who think they are wise.   And He chose things that are powerless to shame those who are powerful, so the same God chose those who reside in the forsaken social margins.   In Dean Edmoundson’s case, those who reside in the forsaken social margins in Puna might benefit from Dean’s painting of their church!
*
Second Timothy 1:7,   “For God has not given us the Spirit of fear; but of power, and of love, and of a sound mind.”

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*
*
We don’t aim at forgetting. Yet, when the power of forgiveness is asked for and given, the delightful paradox is that then we often do forget, just as Jesus intones.  Ephesians 4:32/Romans 3:23/Hebrews 8:12.
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

*

*

*

*
Boogie forward, baby!
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
Ohhhhhh, darling……….     the great unknown vocalist — teenager Anna Zorkina of Russia   –
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
meet our greatest rhythm & rock artist   — incomparable Jackie Wilson  –
*
*
*
*
here are   Lonely Teardrops   at 2:17 on timeclock –   immense passion/elan of  nonpareil Jackie Wilson    –
*
*
*
*
*
*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Life boils down to attitude     –

*

http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2010/aug/26/300-foot-tall-statue-in-san-diegos-future/

*

*

*

*

*

Artist Gary Lee Price works on a prototype of “The Statue of Responsibility.”  - Kenneth Linge

Artist Gary Lee Price works on a 13-foot-tall clay prototype of the Statue of Responsibility, which he designed.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

“I wanted to give credence to Viktor E. Frankl’s idea by creating two human elements coming together,  assisting in the shared responsibility of maintaining freedom,” said sculptor Price.

*

“We are accountable, and the bottom line boils down to us.”      — Gary Lee Price

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anxiety#Existential_anxiety

*

*

*

According to Viktor Frankl, the author of Man’s Search for Meaning, when a person is faced with extreme mortal dangers, the most basic of all human wishes is to find a meaning of life to combat the    ”trauma of nonbeing“     as death is near.

*

*

*

*

The theologian Paul Tillich characterized existential anxiety as “the state in which a being is aware of its possible nonbeing” and he listed three categories for the nonbeing and resulting anxiety:    Ontic (fate and death), moral (guilt and condemnation), and spiritual (emptiness and meaninglessness).

*

According to Tillich, the last of these three types of existential anxiety, i.e. spiritual anxiety, is predominant in modern times while the others were predominant in earlier periods.

*

Tillich argues that this anxiety can be accepted as part of the human condition or it can be resisted but with negative consequences.

*

In its pathological form, spiritual anxiety may tend to “drive the person toward the creation of certitude in systems of meaning which are supported by tradition and authority” even though such “undoubted certitude is not built on the rock of reality.”

[witness our myriad proselytizing despots/authoritarian tyrants of all faiths]

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

275 Responses to Energy vamps Croix Bertelmann and George Tidal Brine

  1. Pingback: our unconscious breaks through in authenticity amid our ego hypocrisy | Curtis Narimatsu

  2. Pingback: Pain, suffering part of the process of experiencing life — from sage Steven Kalas | Curtis Narimatsu

  3. Pingback: alienation [I don't belong] and estrangement [getting dumped because I don't belong] | Curtis Narimatsu

  4. Pingback: “Your budget appears to reflect the values of your favorite philosopher, Ayn Rand, rather than the Gospel of Jesus Christ.” | Curtis Narimatsu

  5. Pingback: to love and to be loved –our innate needs in this tragic & indifferent world — yet authenticity also compels solitary reflection | Curtis Narimatsu

  6. Pingback: ancient sources always inspire contemporary thoughts/writings/symbols | Curtis Narimatsu

  7. Pingback: Catholic Subsidiarity considers government the prime care-taker of the common good with a particular mission to protect the powerless and the poor from exploitation | Curtis Narimatsu

  8. Pingback: Solitary reflections | Curtis Narimatsu

  9. Pingback: Solitary reflections | Curtis Narimatsu

  10. Pingback: online search engines & social media are here to stay, though their vessel names keep a’changin’ | Curtis Narimatsu

  11. Pingback: “For me, there’s hardly a gnat’s whisker of difference between the psychological idea of healthy individuation and the Christian idea of salvation. Both include the lifetime journey of authentic living.” | Curtis Narimatsu

  12. Pingback: “For me, there’s hardly a gnat’s whisker of difference between the psychological idea of healthy individuation and the Christian idea of salvation. Both include the lifetime journey of authentic living.” | Curtis Narimatsu

  13. Pingback: Korean nascent vocal comer Daehyun & in praise of music everywhere | Curtis Narimatsu

  14. Pingback: “Who do you think you are — to be immune from tragedy? What makes you so special that you are unscathed?” | Curtis Narimatsu

  15. Pingback: empathy | Curtis Narimatsu

  16. Pingback: embrace the mystery of it all — music makes the world go ’round | Curtis Narimatsu

  17. Pingback: “It hurts to be treated as a means to an end. The hurt is a sign of our health — our self-respect — not a sign that anything about us needs to be fixed.” — from sage Steven Kalas | Curtis Narimatsu

  18. Pingback: “It hurts to be treated as a means to an end. The hurt is a sign of our health — our self-respect — not a sign that anything about us needs to be fixed.” — from sage Steven Kalas | Curtis Narimatsu

  19. Pingback: “The unconscious is relentless in its desire to communicate authenticity and wholeness to the ego.” — from extraordinary Steven Kalas | Curtis Narimatsu

  20. Pingback: In praise of the great Yolanda Adams and minstrels all across the world — musica duende!! | Curtis Narimatsu

  21. Pingback: forgiving IS forgetting | Curtis Narimatsu

  22. Pingback: See, “no” doesn’t make us not beautiful. And “yes” doesn’t make us beautiful. — Steven Kalas | Curtis Narimatsu

  23. Pingback: a wrap-up on our human condition? ;-) | Curtis Narimatsu

  24. Pingback: Get off the cross! We need the wood! — sage Steven Kalas ;-) | Curtis Narimatsu

  25. Pingback: what is not in our power to do | Curtis Narimatsu

  26. Pingback: demigod & spymaster Petraeus | Curtis Narimatsu

  27. Pingback: “All those moments [of life] will be lost in time, like tears in the rain — time to ***” [for me, time to deal with myself alone] | Curtis Narimatsu

  28. Pingback: Mancia Brothers’ Ohana Martial Arts — Progressing forward via converging the traditional arts of self-defense | Curtis Narimatsu

  29. Pingback: Music lovers all over the world!!! I’m a boogie woogie inside!! | Curtis Narimatsu

  30. Pingback: Himno al amor — in tribute to the great Corina Harry | Curtis Narimatsu

  31. Pingback: Mammon [money/power are god] and Karl Rove/Dick Morris & George Tidal Brine [Morris' terminal prodigy] | Curtis Narimatsu

  32. Pingback: Society blurs the decisive difference between being valuable in the sense of dignity and being valuable in the sense of usefulness — sage Viktor Frankl | Curtis Narimatsu

  33. Pingback: Surrender? Yes — “What is demanded of man is not, as some existential philosophers teach, to endure the meaninglessness of life, but rather to bear rationally his incapacity to grasp its unconditional meaninglessness.” — sage Viktor Fr

  34. Pingback: Surrender? Yes — “What is demanded of man is not, as some existential philosophers teach, to endure the meaninglessness of life, but rather to bear rationally his incapacity to grasp its unconditional meaninglessness.” — sage Viktor Fr

  35. Pingback: Dostoevski said once, “There is only one thing I dread: not to be worthy of my sufferings.” – sage Viktor Frankl | Curtis Narimatsu

  36. Pingback: Redux the great Susan Boyle, who lifts us out of our ego-defense [fear] and self-importance/arrogance [smallness] | Curtis Narimatsu

  37. Pingback: When it all ends, we have to let it go. So, if that’s true, why wait for death? Why not let it go now? And that includes injury, resentment, bitterness, grudges, injustice, and just plain wrong place/wrong time bad luck. — sage Steven Kalas |

  38. Pingback: When it all ends, we have to let it go. So, if that’s true, why wait for death? Why not let it go now? And that includes injury, resentment, bitterness, grudges, injustice, and just plain wrong place/wrong time bad luck. — sage Steven Kalas |

  39. Pingback: When it all ends, we have to let it go. So, if that’s true, why wait for death? Why not let it go now? And that includes injury, resentment, bitterness, grudges, injustice, and just plain wrong place/wrong time bad luck. — sage Steven Kalas |

  40. Pingback: When it all ends, we have to let it go. So, if that’s true, why wait for death? Why not let it go now? And that includes injury, resentment, bitterness, grudges, injustice, and just plain wrong place/wrong time bad luck. — sage Steven Kalas |

  41. Pingback: Music divine!! Heaven pours choirs of angels across her vocal chords and out into the celestial sky above! Choose, honeybun — adorned [Leann Rimes] or unadorned [Maureen Kilgore]?? | Curtis Narimatsu

  42. Pingback: Isn’t it simpler and more accurate to say that your heart is broken? And, if I’m right about that, then, yes, grief is a kind of neediness. That is, grief connotes a need in us. Specifically, the need to grieve! — sage Steven Kalas | Cur

  43. Pingback: Isn’t it simpler and more accurate to say that your heart is broken? And, if I’m right about that, then, yes, grief is a kind of neediness. That is, grief connotes a need in us. Specifically, the need to grieve! — sage Steven Kalas | Cur

  44. Pingback: Music divine!! Heaven pours choirs of angels across her vocal chords and out into the celestial sky above! Choose, honeybun — adorned but great [LeAnn Rimes] or unadorned [Maureen Kilgore]?? | Curtis Narimatsu

  45. Pingback: I write to live authentically — “having been” is the surest kind of being, per great sage Viktor Frankl | Curtis Narimatsu

  46. Pingback: Writing and eventually dying a good death — expressing & sharing love to the end | Curtis Narimatsu

  47. Pingback: musica amor — “Will you still love me tomorrow?” a la wondrous Leslie Grace | Curtis Narimatsu

  48. Pingback: Steven Kalas on forgiveness | Curtis Narimatsu

  49. Pingback: dealing with being rejected/forsaken — the upside/redemptive way to deal with not being chosen | Curtis Narimatsu

  50. Pingback: If we’re going to write, it is because we have a desire to express ourselves, even if we don’t quite understand what we wish to say. It might just be an inner yearning, but by making the choice to engage in the process rather than the result, our work

  51. Pingback: If we’re going to write, it is because we have a desire to express ourselves, even if we don’t quite understand what we wish to say. It might just be an inner yearning, but by making the choice to engage in the process rather than the result, our work

  52. Pingback: If we’re going to write, it is because we have a desire to express ourselves, even if we don’t quite understand what we wish to say. It might just be an inner yearning, but by making the choice to engage in the process rather than the result, our work

  53. Pingback: If we’re going to write, it is because we have a desire to express ourselves, even if we don’t quite understand what we wish to say. It might just be an inner yearning, but by making the choice to engage in the process rather than the result, our work

  54. Pingback: Thriving, learning, & having wisdom are about getting up each morning with intention, clarity, & commitment to seek & nurture connection along life’s healthy, healing path of inner nourishment & peace of mind | Curtis Narimatsu

  55. Pingback: In praise of Kathie Melocco and her ontic, the master Viktor Frankl: Have you reached a turning point in your life? | Curtis Narimatsu

  56. Pingback: Ante Cuvalo: Stipo Sosic– The Road to Hell and Back — Viktor Frankl’s analog | Curtis Narimatsu

  57. Pingback: Finding meaning in suffering a la great master Viktor Frankl | Curtis Narimatsu

  58. Pingback: Musica amore!! Unforgettable Nat King Cole (would be 94 years old today)(daughter Natalie is 63 today) | Curtis Narimatsu

  59. Pingback: The quality of irony is not strained — like Portia in Shakespeare’s Merchant of Venice, irony or mercy must flow freely or not flow at all | Curtis Narimatsu

  60. Pingback: Musica amore!! Introducing great rocker Girish Pradhan | Curtis Narimatsu

  61. Pingback: my Biblical hero Matthew — the lowest of the low | Curtis Narimatsu

  62. Pingback: Sage Jason Velotta: For the people of Jericho, Zacchaeus was the lowest of the low. He was an outcast, the scum of the earth. No one is too wretched, too broken, or too guilty of sin. In fact, no matter what you have done, we are all in the same boat. We

  63. Pingback: Sage Jason Velotta: For the people of Jericho, Zacchaeus was the lowest of the low. He was an outcast, the scum of the earth. No one is too wretched, too broken, or too guilty of sin. In fact, no matter what you have done, we are all in the same boat. We

  64. Pingback: Sage Paul Naumann: Jesus said, “If anyone desires to be first, he shall be last of all and servant of all.” — Mark 9:35. | Curtis Narimatsu

  65. Pingback: Sage Marci Glass: Jesus doesn’t seem to care WHY he’s in this situation. But Jesus does seem to care enough about this man, this foreign, tomb-dwelling, demon possessed man to heal him. | Curtis Narimatsu

  66. Pingback: Sage Tom Stein: Three levels of compassion in Jesus — 1) Jesus has compassion for the man’s condition. While others will reject him and run from him, Jesus heals him. 2) Jesus has compassion for the man’s isolation. How long ago did someone last

  67. Pingback: Sage Tom Stein: Three levels of compassion in Jesus — 1) Jesus has compassion for the man’s condition. While others will reject him and run from him, Jesus heals him. 2) Jesus has compassion for the man’s isolation. How long ago did someone last

  68. Pingback: Sage Larry Brincefield: The Widow of Nain — Jesus’ primary concern was for this poor woman… and Jesus raised her son from the dead… and then, instead of saying “come and follow Me”…He told him to go and care for his dear moth

  69. Pingback: Sage Larry Brincefield: The Widow of Nain — Jesus’ primary concern was for this poor woman… and Jesus raised her son from the dead… and then, instead of saying “come and follow Me”…He told him to go and care for his dear moth

  70. Pingback: Sage Becky Blanton: The difference between true compassion and a snow job is obvious to anyone who has experienced both! The whole point of the parable of the Good Samaritan is that compassion is about one person’s decision to act based on who they were

  71. Pingback: Sage Becky Blanton: The difference between true compassion and a snow job is obvious to anyone who has experienced both! The whole point of the parable of the Good Samaritan is that compassion is about one person’s decision to act based on who they were

  72. Pingback: Sage Mike Bagwell: Yet Jesus’ apostles “turned the world upside down” … for Jesus! These are the exact words of Luke the historian in Acts 17:6. | Curtis Narimatsu

  73. Pingback: Sage Dave Trenholm: Jesus ate meals with Rome’s tax collectors and other disreputable sinners – the lowest of the low – because by simply eating with those people, He was letting them know that they were important to him. If you ate with anyone

  74. Pingback: Sage Dave Trenholm: Jesus ate meals with Rome’s tax collectors and other disreputable sinners – the lowest of the low – because by simply eating with those people, He was letting them know that they were important to him. If you ate with anyone

  75. Pingback: Sage Fred R. Anderson: How could the lawful Pharisees not praise God for that? But still, they must keep their eye on Jesus, for his ways are not their own ways, nor those of John the Baptist and his disciples for that matter. Look at those with whom Jesu

  76. Pingback: Sage Fred R. Anderson: How could the lawful Pharisees not praise God for that? But still, they must keep their eye on Jesus, for his ways are not their own ways, nor those of John the Baptist and his disciples for that matter. Look at those with whom Jesu

  77. Pingback: Margaret M. Mitchell: To describe modern Christians on the basis of their proclamations??? | Curtis Narimatsu

  78. Pingback: Unforgiveness is a major cause of depression, many people have unforgiveness but are not even aware of it because it is buried so deep inside. — Seek God Ministries | Curtis Narimatsu

  79. Pingback: Jesus continually sought out marginalised people to befriend. An immense compassion drew him toward poor people, those with leprosy (who were regarded as outcasts) and tax collectors (who were loathed as traitors). Jesus had friends who would feel at home

  80. Pingback: Jesus continually sought out marginalised people to befriend. An immense compassion drew him toward poor people, those with leprosy (who were regarded as outcasts) and tax collectors (who were loathed as traitors). Jesus had friends who would feel at home

  81. Pingback: Jesus’ invitation was for “the poor, the crippled, the lame, the blind” to share in the Kingdom of God, a feast of equals, of open commensality, where there is no distinctions at the table. Jesus broke down barriers by lifting up those s

  82. Pingback: Jesus’ invitation was for “the poor, the crippled, the lame, the blind” to share in the Kingdom of God, a feast of equals, of open commensality, where there is no distinctions at the table. Jesus broke down barriers by lifting up those s

  83. Pingback: Richard J. Henderson: Once a journalist who had come to report about her mission, looked at her huddled over the body of a dying, destitute man. He said, “You couldn’t pay me to do that kind of work!” Hearing him, Mother Teresa turned an

  84. Pingback: Richard J. Henderson: Once a journalist who had come to report about her mission, looked at her huddled over the body of a dying, destitute man. He said, “You couldn’t pay me to do that kind of work!” Hearing him, Mother Teresa turned an

  85. Pingback: Time and again His parables sought to justify His association with outcasts (Lk. 14:15-24; 15:1-32; Mt. 18:23-25; 20:1-15; 21:28-32). — Carelinks Ministries | Curtis Narimatsu

  86. Pingback: Richard J. Henderson: Once a journalist who had come to report about her mission, looked at her huddled over the body of a dying, destitute man. He said, “You couldn’t pay me to do that kind of work!” Hearing him, Mother Teresa turned an

  87. Pingback: Richard J. Henderson: Once a journalist who had come to report about her mission, looked at her huddled over the body of a dying, destitute man. He said, “You couldn’t pay me to do that kind of work!” Hearing him, Mother Teresa turned an

  88. Pingback: Sage Edward F. Markquart: In Jesus’ parables, the accent is always on the last figure, on the last personality of the story. That is where the focus is. For example, in my opening stories, the focus is on the third stringers who had a change of heart an

  89. Pingback: Sage Edward F. Markquart: In Jesus’ parables, the accent is always on the last figure, on the last personality of the story. That is where the focus is. For example, in my opening stories, the focus is on the third stringers who had a change of heart an

  90. Pingback: Jesus’ life was full of paradoxes: the shepherds who first came to him were the lowest of the low, wandering around in fetid clothes, while the magi were some of the highest in their society. Baby Jesus was surrounded by the pungent smell of animal excr

  91. Pingback: Jesus’ life was full of paradoxes: the shepherds who first came to him were the lowest of the low, wandering around in fetid clothes, while the magi were some of the highest in their society. Baby Jesus was surrounded by the pungent smell of animal excr

  92. Pingback: Jesus’ invitation was for “the poor, the crippled, the lame, the blind” to share in the Kingdom of God, a feast of equals, of open commensality, where there is no distinction at the table. Jesus broke down barriers by lifting up those sh

  93. Pingback: Jesus’ invitation was for “the poor, the crippled, the lame, the blind” to share in the Kingdom of God, a feast of equals, of open commensality, where there is no distinction at the table. Jesus broke down barriers by lifting up those sh

  94. Pingback: Sage Marci Glass: Jesus doesn’t seem to care WHY the other man is in this situation. But Jesus does seem to care enough about this man, this foreign, tomb-dwelling, demon possessed man to heal him. | Curtis Narimatsu

  95. Pingback: David Wilson: If you’ve not been beat up, downcast and broken at some point in your life, stop reading now. For the unscarred and unscathed, I have nothing further to share. I am thankful you have ventured here and wish you continued smooth sailing.

  96. Pingback: David Wilson: If you’ve not been beat up, downcast and broken at some point in your life, stop reading now. For the unscarred and unscathed, I have nothing further to share. I am thankful you have ventured here and wish you continued smooth sailing.

  97. Pingback: The kicker, the twist in this story, is the guest list and the etiquette. Jesus says, Don’t make the rich people, the healthy people, the prominent and powerful first. Nope, invite the poorest, the sick, the cripples, the lowest of the low. They’re th

  98. Pingback: The kicker, the twist in this story, is the guest list and the etiquette. Jesus says, Don’t make the rich people, the healthy people, the prominent and powerful first. Nope, invite the poorest, the sick, the cripples, the lowest of the low. They’re th

  99. Pingback: The kicker, the twist in this story, is the guest list and the etiquette. Jesus says, Don’t make the rich people, the healthy people, the prominent and powerful first. Nope, invite the poorest, the sick, the cripples, the lowest of the low. They’re th

  100. Pingback: The kicker, the twist in this story, is the guest list and the etiquette. Jesus says, Don’t make the rich people, the healthy people, the prominent and powerful first. Nope, invite the poorest, the sick, the cripples, the lowest of the low. They’re th

  101. Pingback: In the case of Christ we have a unique form of persuasion. It is like what happens when an error in our viewpoint is shown to us, and our mind reassembles around the truth that we have not seen. But it is unlike this process in that the truth that takes u

  102. Pingback: In the case of Christ we have a unique form of persuasion. It is like what happens when an error in our viewpoint is shown to us, and our mind reassembles around the truth that we have not seen. But it is unlike this process in that the truth that takes u

  103. Pingback: In the case of Christ we have a unique form of persuasion. It is like what happens when an error in our viewpoint is shown to us, and our mind reassembles around the truth that we have not seen. But it is unlike this process in that the truth that takes u

  104. Pingback: In the case of Christ we have a unique form of persuasion. It is like what happens when an error in our viewpoint is shown to us, and our mind reassembles around the truth that we have not seen. But it is unlike this process in that the truth that takes u

  105. Pingback: Jesus violated every conceivable tradition when it came to His associations with the marginalized of Jewish society. He infuriated the Pharisees with every compassionate touch. The Qumran community of the Essenes had an unconditional law: “No madman, or

  106. Pingback: Jesus violated every conceivable tradition when it came to His associations with the marginalized of Jewish society. He infuriated the Pharisees with every compassionate touch. The Qumran community of the Essenes had an unconditional law: “No madman, or

  107. Pingback: This is why when the almighty God came into the world in Jesus, he came as the lowest of the low, as weakness itself, as a complete and utter nothing. — Robert L. Short | Curtis Narimatsu

  108. Pingback: The beautiful word minister, or Huperetes in Greek, has a very special meaning. It is the name of a very low slave, the lowest of the low. This slave was either shanghaied from his home or from the streets or taken from prison or simply kidnapped and was

  109. Pingback: The beautiful word minister, or Huperetes in Greek, has a very special meaning. It is the name of a very low slave, the lowest of the low. This slave was either shanghaied from his home or from the streets or taken from prison or simply kidnapped and was

  110. Pingback: What did Jesus see? — Judy of Rapture Ready | Curtis Narimatsu

  111. Pingback: They heard him preach about how the smallest, lowest, and least among them, were precious in God’s eyes, and the greatest in the Kingdom of God. — Malina & Altenburg | Curtis Narimatsu

  112. Pingback: We typically refuse to help those who are the source of suffering, disappointment, injustice, humiliation, or disgust. — David Chadwell | Curtis Narimatsu

  113. Pingback: But compassion seems to drive religious people’s charitable feelings LESS than other groups — the more religious ground their generosity less in emotion, and more in doctrine, communal identity, or reputational concerns. | Curtis Narimatsu

  114. Pingback: The {harisees’ statement is intended as a stinging rebuke. It’s not really a question, it’s kind of a rhetorical question, intended to be vindictive and bitter. It’s outrage, why do you eat and drink with the tax gatherers and sinn

  115. Pingback: The {harisees’ statement is intended as a stinging rebuke. It’s not really a question, it’s kind of a rhetorical question, intended to be vindictive and bitter. It’s outrage, why do you eat and drink with the tax gatherers and sinn

  116. Pingback: The Pharisees’ statement is intended as a stinging rebuke. It’s not really a question, it’s kind of a rhetorical question, intended to be vindictive and bitter. It’s outrage, why do you eat and drink with the tax gatherers and sinn

  117. Pingback: After all, where was Jesus found most of the time? For me, I see Jesus living and interacting with beggars, prostitutes and tax collectors the lowest of the low in His society. And by choice and association Jesus himself was one of the marginalized, and I

  118. Pingback: After all, where was Jesus found most of the time? For me, I see Jesus living and interacting with beggars, prostitutes and tax collectors the lowest of the low in His society. And by choice and association Jesus himself was one of the marginalized, and I

  119. Pingback: God who is so high above the nations, reigning from heaven, still looks down upon the earth to the poorest of the poor, the lowliest of the low…God cares for these folks that are often overlooked. When the Psalmist asks us, “Who is like the Lord our G

  120. Pingback: God who is so high above the nations, reigning from heaven, still looks down upon the earth to the poorest of the poor, the lowliest of the low…God cares for these folks that are often overlooked. When the Psalmist asks us, “Who is like the Lord our G

  121. Pingback: God who is so high above the nations, reigning from heaven, still looks down upon the earth to the poorest of the poor, the lowliest of the low…God cares for these folks that are often overlooked. When the Psalmist asks us, “Who is like the Lord our G

  122. Pingback: God who is so high above the nations, reigning from heaven, still looks down upon the earth to the poorest of the poor, the lowliest of the low…God cares for these folks that are often overlooked. When the Psalmist asks us, “Who is like the Lord our G

  123. Pingback: After all, where was Jesus found most of the time? For me, I see Jesus living and interacting with beggars, prostitutes and tax collectors — the lowest of the low in His society. And by choice and association Jesus himself was one of the marginalize

  124. Pingback: After all, where was Jesus found most of the time? For me, I see Jesus living and interacting with beggars, prostitutes and tax collectors — the lowest of the low in His society. And by choice and association Jesus himself was one of the marginalize

  125. Pingback: They heard him preach about how the smallest, lowest, and least among them — were precious in God’s eyes, and the greatest in the Kingdom of God. — Malina & Altenburg | Curtis Narimatsu

  126. Pingback: God who is so high above the nations, reigning from heaven, still looks down upon the earth to the poorest of the poor, the lowliest of the low…God cares for these folks that are often overlooked. When the Psalmist asks us, “Who is like the Lord our G

  127. Pingback: God who is so high above the nations, reigning from heaven, still looks down upon the earth to the poorest of the poor, the lowliest of the low…God cares for these folks that are often overlooked. When the Psalmist asks us, “Who is like the Lord our G

  128. Pingback: God who is so high above the nations, reigning from heaven, still looks down upon the earth to the poorest of the poor, the lowliest of the low…God cares for these folks that are often overlooked. When the Psalmist asks us, “Who is like the Lord our G

  129. Pingback: God who is so high above the nations, reigning from heaven, still looks down upon the earth to the poorest of the poor, the lowliest of the low…God cares for these folks that are often overlooked. When the Psalmist asks us, “Who is like the Lord our G

  130. Pingback: Jesus answered and said to him, “What I do you do not realize now but you shall understand hereafter.” You don’t get it, Peter, you don’t get My humiliation. You think this is too lowly for Me, you think this is too humble for Me,

  131. Pingback: Jesus answered and said to him, “What I do you do not realize now but you shall understand hereafter.” You don’t get it, Peter, you don’t get My humiliation. You think this is too lowly for Me, you think this is too humble for Me,

  132. Pingback: How often do we judge others? I’ll be the first to say that it’s definitely more than it should be. Without even realizing, we judge instantly based on appearance. In the back of our minds, we convince ourselves we are better because we don

  133. Pingback: How often do we judge others? I’ll be the first to say that it’s definitely more than it should be. Without even realizing, we judge instantly based on appearance. In the back of our minds, we convince ourselves we are better because we don

  134. Pingback: If you were in the bottom of a hole.. who would you most resent helping you out of the hole? Just think about it….. ‘Cause that’s whom Jesus calls you to love. — April Coates | Curtis Narimatsu

  135. Pingback: Healing the sick. Loving the unloved. Welcoming the unwelcomed. Gathering the little ones. Receiving the rejected and abandoned. Comforting the elders. The Paschal Mystery (Passover) is the greatest act of compassion. God, suffering with us, putting every

  136. Pingback: Healing the sick. Loving the unloved. Welcoming the unwelcomed. Gathering the little ones. Receiving the rejected and abandoned. Comforting the elders. The Paschal Mystery (Passover) is the greatest act of compassion. God, suffering with us, putting every

  137. Pingback: Many of us claim to love humanity even – the lowest of the low like lepers, prostitutes, and tax-collectors. (Now you know why income tax returns are due at Easter). In affirming the lowest of the low Jesus affirmed humanity. In His emphasis upon th

  138. Pingback: Many of us claim to love humanity even – the lowest of the low like lepers, prostitutes, and tax-collectors. (Now you know why income tax returns are due at Easter). In affirming the lowest of the low Jesus affirmed humanity. In His emphasis upon th

  139. Pingback: Many of us claim to love humanity even – the lowest of the low like lepers, prostitutes, and tax-collectors. (Now you know why income tax returns are due at Easter). In affirming the lowest of the low Jesus affirmed humanity. In His emphasis upon th

  140. Pingback: Many of us claim to love humanity even – the lowest of the low like lepers, prostitutes, and tax-collectors. (Now you know why income tax returns are due at Easter). In affirming the lowest of the low Jesus affirmed humanity. In His emphasis upon th

  141. Pingback: Many of us claim to love humanity even – the lowest of the low like lepers, prostitutes, and tax-collectors. (Now you know why income tax returns are due at Easter). In affirming the lowest of the low Jesus affirmed humanity. In His emphasis upon th

  142. Pingback: Many of us claim to love humanity even – the lowest of the low like lepers, prostitutes, and tax-collectors. (Now you know why income tax returns are due at Easter). In affirming the lowest of the low Jesus affirmed humanity. In His emphasis upon th

  143. Pingback: Here’s the power of hospitality—this willingness to go out of our way to invite and welcome and include those who formerly felt themselves to be on the outside looking in, creating holy space where those who formerly felt themselves to be alienated an

  144. Pingback: Here’s the power of hospitality—this willingness to go out of our way to invite and welcome and include those who formerly felt themselves to be on the outside looking in, creating holy space where those who formerly felt themselves to be alienated an

  145. Pingback: But is that the way Jesus treated tax collectors and other outsiders? Matthew 11, verse 19 refers to Jesus as “a friend of tax collectors and sinners”. Time and again in the gospels we witness Jesus befriending those whom others have cast asid

  146. Pingback: But is that the way Jesus treated tax collectors and other outsiders? Matthew 11, verse 19 refers to Jesus as “a friend of tax collectors and sinners”. Time and again in the gospels we witness Jesus befriending those whom others have cast asid

  147. Pingback: But is that the way Jesus treated tax collectors and other outsiders? Matthew 11, verse 19 refers to Jesus as “a friend of tax collectors and sinners”. Time and again in the gospels we witness Jesus befriending those whom others have cast asid

  148. Pingback: But is that the way Jesus treated tax collectors and other outsiders? Matthew 11, verse 19 refers to Jesus as “a friend of tax collectors and sinners”. Time and again in the gospels we witness Jesus befriending those whom others have cast asid

  149. Pingback: Jesus stood in the face of all social convention, and loudly proclaimed that those that see the spirituality of service, and sacrifice, are closer to the kingdom of God, than those with correct doctrine, correct church, and correct lineage. Jesus, this ra

  150. Pingback: Jesus stood in the face of all social convention, and loudly proclaimed that those that see the spirituality of service, and sacrifice, are closer to the kingdom of God, than those with correct doctrine, correct church, and correct lineage. Jesus, this ra

  151. Pingback: Do you know Him? | Curtis Narimatsu

  152. Pingback: Jesus stood in the face of all social convention, and loudly proclaimed that those that see the spirituality of service, and sacrifice, are closer to the kingdom of God, than those with correct doctrine, correct church, and correct lineage. Jesus, this ra

  153. Pingback: Jesus stood in the face of all social convention, and loudly proclaimed that those that see the spirituality of service, and sacrifice, are closer to the kingdom of God, than those with correct doctrine, correct church, and correct lineage. Jesus, this ra

  154. Pingback: But is that the way Jesus treated tax collectors and other outsiders? Matthew 11, verse 19 refers to Jesus as “a friend of tax collectors and sinners”. Time and again in the gospels we witness Jesus befriending those whom others have cast asid

  155. Pingback: But is that the way Jesus treated tax collectors and other outsiders? Matthew 11, verse 19 refers to Jesus as “a friend of tax collectors and sinners”. Time and again in the gospels we witness Jesus befriending those whom others have cast asid

  156. Pingback: How often do we judge others? I’ll be the first to say that it’s definitely more than it should be. Without even realizing, we judge instantly based on appearance. In the back of our minds, we convince ourselves we are better because we don

  157. Pingback: How often do we judge others? I’ll be the first to say that it’s definitely more than it should be. Without even realizing, we judge instantly based on appearance. In the back of our minds, we convince ourselves we are better because we don

  158. Pingback: In praise of Lester Chun: Intentionality & the Holy Spirit within oneself | Curtis Narimatsu

  159. Pingback: The Christian distinction which separates Christianity from earlier religions: Matthew 5:44 — Love your enemies, bless those who curse you, do good to those who hate you, and pray for those who mistreat you and persecute you. | Curtis Narimatsu

  160. Pingback: What is not in your power to do — to change your enemy — thence, help heal your pain by letting go of your vengeance | Curtis Narimatsu

  161. Pingback: Of a Natalia Stavas — Bombs, Instincts and Morals: Why Heroes Risk It All for Strangers — Jeffrey Kluger | Curtis Narimatsu

  162. Pingback: “To be yourself in a world that is constantly trying to make you something else is the greatest accomplishment.” — Ralph Waldo Emerson — Embracing Authenticity — by Randy Hain | Curtis Narimatsu

  163. Pingback: Evil tetrad/foursome — 1) psychopathy (e.g. charm mask) 2) sadism 3) narcissism (energy vamp via self-aggrandizement) 4) Machiavellianism (deceiving/schemer) | Curtis Narimatsu

  164. Pingback: My Saint — Oscar Romero — and a flourishing of the Social Gospel, with credit to current Pope Francis | Curtis Narimatsu

  165. Pingback: Musica amore!! Reprise Led Zeppelin’s greatest tune — “Lemon Song” — of 45 years ago!! | Curtis Narimatsu

  166. Pingback: Karyl McBride: Why Am I So Afraid of Being Alone? It may even clear your thoughts about what is healthy for you. “Sometimes it takes darkness and the sweet confinement of your aloneness to learn that anything or anyone that does not bring you alive

  167. Pingback: Karyl McBride: Why Am I So Afraid of Being Alone? It may even clear your thoughts about what is healthy for you. “Sometimes it takes darkness and the sweet confinement of your aloneness to learn that anything or anyone that does not bring you alive

  168. Pingback: Karyl McBride: Why Am I So Afraid of Being Alone? It may even clear your thoughts about what is healthy for you. “Sometimes it takes darkness and the sweet confinement of your aloneness to learn that anything or anyone that does not bring you alive

  169. Pingback: Karyl McBride: Why Am I So Afraid of Being Alone? It may even clear your thoughts about what is healthy for you. “Sometimes it takes darkness and the sweet confinement of your aloneness to learn that anything or anyone that does not bring you alive

  170. Pingback: Karyl McBride: Why Am I So Afraid of Being Alone? It may even clear your thoughts about what is healthy for you. “Sometimes it takes darkness and the sweet confinement of your aloneness to learn that anything or anyone that does not bring you alive

  171. Pingback: Karyl McBride: Why Am I So Afraid of Being Alone? It may even clear your thoughts about what is healthy for you. “Sometimes it takes darkness and the sweet confinement of your aloneness to learn that anything or anyone that does not bring you alive

  172. Pingback: Living well[spring] | Curtis Narimatsu

  173. Pingback: How to deal with loneliness: To stop feeling lonely, we first must accept that we are feeling lonely. Sometimes admitting that to ourselves is difficult. We then have to express those feelings of loneliness in some way. We might find ourselves writing in

  174. Pingback: How to deal with loneliness: To stop feeling lonely, we first must accept that we are feeling lonely. Sometimes admitting that to ourselves is difficult. We then have to express those feelings of loneliness in some way. We might find ourselves writing in

  175. Pingback: Musica amore!! Electronic guitar genesis rockers of 1966 Cream’s Clapton/Baker/Bruce & southern England’s Black Blues sound (vs. northern England/Liverpool’s Beatles’ rockabilly sound) — reprise Cream’s signature me

  176. Pingback: Musica amore!! Electronic guitar genesis rockers of 1966 Cream’s Clapton/Baker/Bruce & southern England’s Black Blues sound (vs. northern England/Liverpool’s Beatles’ rockabilly sound) — reprise Cream’s signature me

  177. Pingback: As the recent history of American Protestantism proves, when faith becomes the servant of partisan politics, even a great religious tradition can lose its soul. So, where have all the Protestants gone? They are swelling the ranks of America’s fastes

  178. Pingback: As the recent history of American Protestantism proves, when faith becomes the servant of partisan politics, even a great religious tradition can lose its soul. So, where have all the Protestants gone? They are swelling the ranks of America’s fastes

  179. Pingback: Musica amore! Introducing Brazil’s Leonardo Sperling | Curtis Narimatsu

  180. Pingback: “This is Water” – David Foster Wallace — Wallace used many forms of irony, but focused on individuals’ continued longing for earnest, unselfconscious experience and communication in a media-saturated society. Wallace helped u

  181. Pingback: “This is Water” – David Foster Wallace — Wallace used many forms of irony, but focused on individuals’ continued longing for earnest, unselfconscious experience and communication in a media-saturated society. Wallace helped u

  182. Pingback: “Ultimately I was fascinated by Gatsby as a character. I was moved by him. It no longer became a love story to me. It became a tragedy of this new American, this man in a new world where everything is possible, and at a time of great opulence in the

  183. Pingback: “Ultimately I was fascinated by Gatsby as a character. I was moved by him. It no longer became a love story to me. It became a tragedy of this new American, this man in a new world where everything is possible, and at a time of great opulence in the

  184. Pingback: Musica amore! Androgynous Tight Fit’s “The Lion Sleeps Tonight” | Curtis Narimatsu

  185. Pingback: Ask yourself the ultimate questions in your life. Who am I? What is my purpose? What is important to me? How do I live an authentic life? By asking the ultimate questions in your life, you begin the lifelong journey inward, a journey of reflection, contem

  186. Pingback: Ask yourself the ultimate questions in your life. Who am I? What is my purpose? What is important to me? How do I live an authentic life? By asking the ultimate questions in your life, you begin the lifelong journey inward, a journey of reflection, contem

  187. Pingback: Ask yourself the ultimate questions in your life. Who am I? What is my purpose? What is important to me? How do I live an authentic life? By asking the ultimate questions in your life, you begin the lifelong journey inward, a journey of reflection, contem

  188. Pingback: Ask yourself the ultimate questions in your life. Who am I? What is my purpose? What is important to me? How do I live an authentic life? By asking the ultimate questions in your life, you begin the lifelong journey inward, a journey of reflection, contem

  189. Pingback: Ask yourself the ultimate questions in your life. Who am I? What is my purpose? What is important to me? How do I live an authentic life? By asking the ultimate questions in your life, you begin the lifelong journey inward, a journey of reflection, contem

  190. Pingback: Ask yourself the ultimate questions in your life. Who am I? What is my purpose? What is important to me? How do I live an authentic life? By asking the ultimate questions in your life, you begin the lifelong journey inward, a journey of reflection, contem

  191. Pingback: Jesus’ death becomes even more powerful when this particular messiah also carries your personal projections. That is, the celebrity’s life mirrors important pieces of your own psychic journey. Your own life dramas. Jesus did this for me with h

  192. Pingback: Jesus’ death becomes even more powerful when this particular messiah also carries your personal projections. That is, the celebrity’s life mirrors important pieces of your own psychic journey. Your own life dramas. Jesus did this for me with h

  193. Pingback: Jesus’ death becomes even more powerful when this particular messiah also carries your personal projections. That is, the celebrity’s life mirrors important pieces of your own psychic journey. Your own life dramas. Jesus did this for me with h

  194. Pingback: Jesus’ death becomes even more powerful when this particular messiah also carries your personal projections. That is, the celebrity’s life mirrors important pieces of your own psychic journey. Your own life dramas. Jesus did this for me with h

  195. Pingback: Jesus’ death becomes even more powerful when this particular messiah also carries your personal projections. That is, the celebrity’s life mirrors important pieces of your own psychic journey. Your own life dramas. Jesus did this for me with h

  196. Pingback: Jesus’ death becomes even more powerful when this particular messiah also carries your personal projections. That is, the celebrity’s life mirrors important pieces of your own psychic journey. Your own life dramas. Jesus did this for me with h

  197. Pingback: Musica amore!! Golden Summer’s 50th annual anniversary of Judy Craig’s Chiffons’ “One Fine Day” tune | Curtis Narimatsu

  198. Pingback: Musica amore! So who’s lovin’ you, baby???!! (in praise of Smokey Robinson’s 53 yr. old classic, as sung by none other than our salt of the earth — life’s most enthralling vocalists — Ahsan & Ashley!!) | Curtis Nari

  199. Pingback: Musica amore! So who’s lovin’ you, baby???!! (in praise of Smokey Robinson’s 53 yr. old classic, as sung by none other than our salt of the earth — life’s most enthralling vocalists — Ahsan & Ashley!!) | Curtis Nari

  200. Pingback: Musica amore! So who’s lovin’ you, baby???!! (in praise of Smokey Robinson’s 53 yr. old classic, as sung by none other than our salt of the earth — life’s most enthralling vocalists — Ahsan & Ashley!!) | Curtis Nari

  201. Pingback: Musica amore! So who’s lovin’ you, baby???!! (in praise of Smokey Robinson’s 53 yr. old classic, as sung by none other than our salt of the earth — life’s most enthralling vocalists — Ahsan & Ashley!!) | Curtis Nari

  202. Pingback: We all have the power to pick our attitudes | Curtis Narimatsu

  203. Pingback: Then Jesus cleansed the temple of everything evil about us — then in typical mob hysteria, we “cleansed” ourselves of Jesus via His Crucifixion | Curtis Narimatsu

  204. Pingback: In praise of nickname Stoner’s bridging the proverbial age gap — from Stoner age 43 to Peter age 66: “You are not an uptight jerk” (like other ultra-judgmental old farts!!) | Curtis Narimatsu

  205. Pingback: In praise of nickname Stoner’s bridging the proverbial generation gap — from Stoner age 43 to Peter age 66: “You are not an uptight jerk” (like other ultra-judgmental old farts!!) | Curtis Narimatsu

  206. Pingback: In praise of nickname Stoner’s bridging the proverbial generation gap — from Stoner age 43 to Peter age 66: “You are not an uptight jerk” (like other ultra-judgmental old farts!!) | Curtis Narimatsu

  207. Pingback: Yushin “Charley” Narimatsu 1920-2013 died age 93 — my Nisei 2nd generation uncle the last of his generation in my kazoku/family | Curtis Narimatsu

  208. Pingback: Ambivalence: The hair-thin line between being thrilled (Jesus our savior comes to our town Jerusalem) and being threatened (our own ambivalence — Jesus cleanses the temple of everything evil about ourselves — we feel threatened by Jesus reveal

  209. Pingback: Ambivalence: The hair-thin line between being thrilled (Jesus our savior comes to our town Jerusalem) and being threatened (our own ambivalence — Jesus cleanses the temple of everything evil about ourselves — we feel threatened by Jesus reveal

  210. Pingback: Ambivalence: The hair-thin line between being thrilled (Jesus our savior comes to our town Jerusalem) and being threatened (our own ambivalence — Jesus cleanses the temple of everything evil about ourselves — we feel threatened by Jesus reveal

  211. Pingback: Ambivalence: The hair-thin line between being thrilled (Jesus our savior comes to our town Jerusalem) and being threatened (our own ambivalence — Jesus cleanses the temple of everything evil about ourselves — we feel threatened by Jesus reveal

  212. Pingback: Conscripted into someone’s crises of fear (ego defense) and smallness (arrogance/self-important): Movie “The Way, Way Back” — Trent is … awful. Utterly purposely oblivious to anything but his own ego images of how his life “oug

  213. Pingback: Love-hate dynamic of mob hysteria in praising, then killing Jesus — all within a week’s time | Curtis Narimatsu

  214. Pingback: So Jesus exposed our unlovely selves (Jesus’ cleansing of the temple by ridding it of our money-changers) — we didn’t have to kill Jesus — we could have sublimated our primal fears about our hypocritical nature — and instead

  215. Pingback: So Jesus exposed our unlovely selves (Jesus’ cleansing of the temple by ridding it of our money-changers) — we didn’t have to kill Jesus — we could have sublimated our primal fears about our hypocritical nature — and instead

  216. Pingback: We depraved humans are so fickle, to say the least — my recount of Jesus’ exposure of our mob hysteria 2,000 yrs. ago — nothing has changed in us since then — we still are a mob in senseless hysteria | Curtis Narimatsu

  217. Pingback: Aquinas is equidistant to early church father Augustine 400 yrs. before Aquinas — and to us 400 yrs. after 1200 AD Aquinas — yet, nothing has changed in us — we still are as depraved today as we were when we crucified Jesus in our sensel

  218. Pingback: Aquinas is equidistant to early church father Augustine 400 yrs. before Aquinas — and to us 400 yrs. after 1200 AD Aquinas — yet, nothing has changed in us — we still are as depraved today as we were when we crucified Jesus in our sensel

  219. Pingback: Aquinas is equidistant to early church father Augustine 800 yrs. before Aquinas — and to us 800 yrs. after 1200 AD Aquinas — yet, nothing has changed in us — we still are as depraved today as we were when we crucified Jesus in our sensel

  220. Pingback: Aquinas is equidistant to early church father Augustine 800 yrs. before Aquinas — and to us 800 yrs. after 1200 AD Aquinas — yet, nothing has changed in us — we still are as depraved today as we were when we crucified Jesus in our sensel

  221. Pingback: Aquinas is equidistant to early church father Augustine 800 yrs. before Aquinas — and to us 800 yrs. after 1200 AD Aquinas — yet, nothing has changed in us — we still are as depraved today as we were when we crucified Jesus in our sensel

  222. Pingback: Aquinas is equidistant to early church father Augustine 800 yrs. before Aquinas — and to us 800 yrs. after 1200 AD Aquinas — yet, nothing has changed in us — we still are as depraved today as we were when we crucified Jesus in our sensel

  223. Pingback: Nothing has changed in us — we still are as depraved today as we were when we crucified Jesus in our senseless mob hysteria — Aquinas is equidistant to early church father Augustine 800 yrs. before Aquinas — and to us 800 yrs. after 1200

  224. Pingback: Nothing has changed in us — we still are as depraved today as we were when we crucified Jesus in our senseless mob hysteria — Aquinas is equidistant to early church father Augustine 800 yrs. before Aquinas — and to us 800 yrs. after 1200

  225. Pingback: We depraved humans of immense despair — nothing has changed in us — we still are as depraved today as we were when we crucified Jesus in our senseless mob hysteria — Aquinas is equidistant to early church father Augustine 800 yrs. before

  226. Pingback: We depraved humans of immense despair — nothing has changed in us — we still are as depraved today as we were when we crucified Jesus in our senseless mob hysteria — Aquinas is equidistant to early church father Augustine 800 yrs. before

  227. Pingback: We depraved humans of immense despair — nothing has changed in us — we still are as depraved today as we were when we crucified Jesus in our senseless mob hysteria — Aquinas is equidistant to early church father Augustine 800 yrs. before

  228. Pingback: We depraved humans of immense despair — nothing has changed in us — we still are as depraved today as we were when we crucified Jesus in our senseless mob hysteria — Aquinas is equidistant to early church father Augustine 800 yrs. before

  229. Pingback: We depraved humans of immense despair — nothing has changed in us — we still are as depraved today as we were when we crucified Jesus in our senseless mob hysteria — Aquinas is equidistant to early church father Augustine 800 yrs. before

  230. Pingback: We are depraved humans steeped in immense despair — nothing has changed in us — we still are as depraved today as we were when we crucified Jesus in our senseless mob hysteria — Aquinas is equidistant to early church father Augustine 800

  231. Pingback: We are depraved humans steeped in immense despair — nothing has changed in us — we still are as depraved today as we were when we crucified Jesus in our senseless mob hysteria — Aquinas is equidistant to early church father Augustine 800

  232. Pingback: We are depraved humans steeped in immense despair — nothing has changed in us — we still are as depraved today as we were when we crucified Jesus in our senseless mob hysteria — Aquinas is equidistant to early church father Augustine 800

  233. Pingback: Jesus’ mind-blowing reversal/frustration of all expectations — turning common-sense ideas upside down, confounding us all — spark our deepest imaginative opposites/impossibilities, to say the least!! | Curtis Narimatsu

  234. Pingback: Jesus’ mind-blowing reversal/frustration of all expectations — turning common-sense ideas upside down, confounding us all — Jesus sparks our beautifully deepest, imaginative “opposites/impossibilities of thought,” to say the

  235. Pingback: Jesus’ mind-blowing reversal/frustration of all expectations — turning common-sense ideas upside down, confounding us all — Jesus sparks our beautifully deepest, imaginative “opposites/impossibilities of thought,” to say the

  236. Pingback: Jesus’ mind-blowing “huli ‘au” (upside down) overturning of this world of our flesh — Jesus violated every conceivable tradition when it came to His associations with the marginalized of Jewish society. He infuriated the Phar

  237. Pingback: Jesus’ mind-blowing “huli ‘au” (upside down) overturning of this world of our flesh — Jesus violated every conceivable tradition when it came to His associations with the marginalized of Jewish society. He infuriated the Phar

  238. Pingback: Jesus’ mind-blowing “huli ‘au” (upside down) overturning of this world of our flesh — Jesus violated every conceivable tradition when it came to His associations with the marginalized of Jewish society. He infuriated the Phar

  239. Pingback: Jesus’ mind-blowing “huli ‘au” (upside down) overturning of this world of our flesh — Jesus violated every conceivable tradition when it came to His associations with the marginalized of Jewish society. He infuriated the Phar

  240. Pingback: Mind-blowing Jesus stands inexplicably before us, and Jesus turns common-sense ideas upside down, confounding us all! Dedicated to authentic Ri-in!! | Curtis Narimatsu

  241. Pingback: An insecure person conscripts you into one’s 1) ego defense (fear) and 2) smallness (blowhard self inflation) | Curtis Narimatsu

  242. Pingback: The existence of cowards can be summed up: “The sum of the intelligence of the planet is a constant, and the population is increasing.” | Curtis Narimatsu

  243. Pingback: Life is full of reversals of expectations, baby!! Dedicated to my little girl Staycie age 40 — my separation anxiety from my baby girl when she turned 18 & left home to live on her own turned out to be her greatest crossover to independence R

  244. Pingback: Life is full of reversals of expectations, baby!! Dedicated to my little girl Staycie age 40 — my separation anxiety from my baby girl when she turned 18 & left home to live on her own turned out to be her greatest crossover to independence R

  245. Pingback: Hawaii’s greatest modern wayfinder Rev. Hung Wai Ching (1905-2002) alter ego Rev. Reinhold Niebuhr (1892-1971) — Niebuhr’s immensely popular Serenity Prayer: “Taking, as Jesus did, this sinful world as it is, not as I would have it

  246. Pingback: Hawaii’s greatest modern wayfinder Rev. Hung Wai Ching (1905-2002) alter ego Rev. Reinhold Niebuhr (1892-1971) — Niebuhr’s immensely popular Serenity Prayer: “Taking, as Jesus did, this sinful world as it is, not as I would have it

  247. Pingback: Emotional conscription/”rescue me” (but after I’m done with your help, you can go to hell): “There’s a Fire in the Barn!” is an old trick, used in politics, debate, and commonly deployed as a way to control, manage, dominate or eve

  248. Pingback: Calvinism, we keep being reminded, was the faith of the Puritans who settled most early American colonies, and its teachings are reflected in founding documents. Since the U.S. Constitution is so preoccupied with checks and balances, some old-timers found

  249. Pingback: Calvinism, we keep being reminded, was the faith of the Puritans who settled most early American colonies, and its teachings are reflected in founding documents. Since the U.S. Constitution is so preoccupied with checks and balances, some old-timers found

  250. Pingback: Calvinism, we keep being reminded, was the faith of the Puritans who settled most early American colonies, and its teachings are reflected in founding documents. Since the U.S. Constitution is so preoccupied with checks and balances, some old-timers found

  251. Pingback: Calvinism, we keep being reminded, was the faith of the Puritans who settled most early American colonies, and its teachings are reflected in founding documents. Since the U.S. Constitution is so preoccupied with checks and balances, some old-timers found

  252. Pingback: To love and be loved are what life is all about | Curtis Narimatsu

  253. Pingback: Søren Kierkegaard says that life is full of absurdity, and one must make his and her own values in an indifferent world. One can live meaningfully (free of despair and anxiety) in an unconditional commitment to something finite, and devotes that meaningf

  254. Pingback: Søren Kierkegaard says that life is full of absurdity, and one must make his and her own values in an indifferent world. One can live meaningfully (free of despair and anxiety) in an unconditional commitment to something finite, and devotes that meaningf

  255. Pingback: Søren Kierkegaard says that life is full of absurdity, and one must make his and her own values in an indifferent world. One can live meaningfully (free of despair and anxiety) in an unconditional commitment to something finite, and devotes that meaningf

  256. Pingback: Søren Kierkegaard says that life is full of absurdity, and one must make his and her own values in an indifferent world. One can live meaningfully (free of despair and anxiety) in an unconditional commitment to something finite, and devotes that meaningf

  257. Pingback: Søren Kierkegaard says that life is full of absurdity, and one must make his and her own values in an indifferent world. One can live meaningfully (free of despair and anxiety) in an unconditional commitment to something finite, and devotes that meaningf

  258. Pingback: Søren Kierkegaard says that life is full of absurdity, and one must make his and her own values in an indifferent world. One can live meaningfully (free of despair and anxiety) in an unconditional commitment to something finite, and devotes that meaningf

  259. Pingback: I’m here to love and be loved | Curtis Narimatsu

  260. Pingback: 1 Peter 4:8 — Love covers a multitude of sins — Center of Grace — or in the secular sense, forgive yourself for what is not in your power to do | Curtis Narimatsu

  261. Pingback: luck of the draw (bad or good) — forgive yourself for what is not in your power to do — Steven Kalas | Curtis Narimatsu

  262. Pingback: Nobody comes to therapy who hasn’t lost something. The heart is injured. Limping. Constrained by psychic adhesions. Aching, either obviously or just behind the curtain of consciousness. The therapeutic relationship is the MRI. It reveals what’s torn.

  263. Pingback: Nobody comes to therapy who hasn’t lost something. The heart is injured. Limping. Constrained by psychic adhesions. Aching, either obviously or just behind the curtain of consciousness. The therapeutic relationship is the MRI. It reveals what’s torn.

  264. Pingback: Nobody comes to therapy who hasn’t lost something. The heart is injured. Limping. Constrained by psychic adhesions. Aching, either obviously or just behind the curtain of consciousness. The therapeutic relationship is the MRI. It reveals what’s torn.

  265. Pingback: Nobody comes to therapy who hasn’t lost something. The heart is injured. Limping. Constrained by psychic adhesions. Aching, either obviously or just behind the curtain of consciousness. The therapeutic relationship is the MRI. It reveals what’s torn.

  266. Pingback: Nobody comes to therapy who hasn’t lost something. The heart is injured. Limping. Constrained by psychic adhesions. Aching, either obviously or just behind the curtain of consciousness. The therapeutic relationship is the MRI. It reveals what’s torn.

  267. Pingback: Nobody comes to therapy who hasn’t lost something. The heart is injured. Limping. Constrained by psychic adhesions. Aching, either obviously or just behind the curtain of consciousness. The therapeutic relationship is the MRI. It reveals what’s torn.

  268. Pingback: Nobody comes to therapy who hasn’t lost something. The heart is injured. Limping. Constrained by psychic adhesions. Aching, either obviously or just behind the curtain of consciousness. The therapeutic relationship is the MRI. It reveals what’s torn.

  269. Pingback: To love and to be loved are mystical desires a la Carl Jung’s archetypes (Jung’s forebearers were mystics Plato, Apostle Paul, & Augustine) | Curtis Narimatsu

  270. Pingback: The young man with terminal cancer was going to die quicker than he thought, and he was very depressed about this. And of course he hadn’t gotten to make his mark, and he had this conversation with this young woman. And the young woman said, “No,

  271. Pingback: The young man with terminal cancer was going to die quicker than he thought, and he was very depressed about this. And of course he hadn’t gotten to make his mark, and he had this conversation with this young woman. And the young woman said, “No,

  272. Pingback: The young man with terminal cancer was going to die quicker than he thought, and he was very depressed about this. And of course he hadn’t gotten to make his mark, and he had this conversation with this young woman. And the young woman said, “No,

  273. Pingback: Modern society’s devolution and self-absorption — we need symbols which participate in the things they represent | Curtis Narimatsu

  274. Pingback: Depressive symptoms: Crisis of meaning and self-absorption | Curtis Narimatsu

  275. Pingback: Music: A bridge from abandonment and brokenness to wholeness and freedom | Curtis Narimatsu

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s