alienation [I don’t belong] and estrangement [getting dumped because I don’t belong]

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Alienation & estrangement   –  the results of Loss  [e.g. getting dumped]  by your beloved  [lifemate/soulmate]   

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http://www.lvrj.com/blogs/kalas/_Retirement_leaves_time_for_pondering_self_relationships.html

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Question: What do all people seeking release from personal despair have in common?

Answer: They are suffering some combination of alienation and estrangement.

Alienation means a crisis of belonging. We are alien. We don’t belong.

Estrangement means the painful disruption of the bonds of relationship. Interpersonal injuries and injustices. To become estranged is to become a stranger to the one we love and by whom we are loved.

I’m saying your use of the word “misfit” sounds like a crisis of alienation and estrangement.

A&E crises come in three flavors, often scooped together in the same bowl:

Actual A&E: Important relationships sometimes unravel (become estranged). Sometimes, the cause is egregious injury done to the other. Other times relationships just unravel. Some people are actually alienated by society.  Old people, gay people, poor people, Fierce Truth-tellers — some people are quite deliberately excluded in whole or in part from belonging.

Existential A&E: Contained in the collective human consciousness there is a universal and essential experience of alienation and estrangement as existential reality. Silly religions deny this. Significant religions describe it, narrate it, concretize it in great stories such as Adam and Eve’s banishment from the Garden of Eden (Judaism), or it is symbolized in broken bread and wine poured out (Christianity).

Intra-psychic A&E: People presenting themselves in therapy come to explore their alienation and estrangement with self. The brokenness between me and me. They come to gather and reconcile the disconnected and often wounded pieces and parts of identity.

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Humble honesty is not ego-driven self-pity [self-loathing]

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http://www.lvrj.com/blogs/kalas/Surviving_economic_changes_requires_rethinking_happiness.html

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When we’re already feeling scared and depressed, the human ego finds easy purchase in resentment  (“This is unfair! I followed the rules!”), or self-loathing   (“I’m unemployed, therefore I must be a real loser!”)
 
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Mental health means telling the voices of entitlement   [being egotistic/singularly special], resentment  [feeling persecuted like Jesus]and self-criticism  [ohh woe is me]   to “sit down and shut up.”
 
 
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Self-loathing is, ironically, a consequence of narcissism — not humility.   When I was a priest, I used to say it this way to pilgrims making their strident, anguished case for unforgiveability: “OK, ‘For God so loved the world’ (emphasis mine) … except for you? The work of redemption in the life of Jesus set the entire cosmos free from sin and death … except for you? Well. Hmm. Aren’t you … remarkable. The one person in the history of time whose dereliction is more powerful than God.”That little speech invariably changed the tone, direction and energy of pastoral counseling. And for the better.
 
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My friend, Nate Larkin, would say it even better in his terrific book “Samson and the Pirate Monks: Calling Men to Authentic Brotherhood.” Nate says we combine narcissism and self-loathing so brilliantly that both are invisible to us. In such moments, we become “the piece of (expletive) around which the entire world revolves.”

Yikes!

 
 
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It’s a virtual cliche for modern patients in therapy to self-diagnose with “I need to work on my self-esteem.” It rarely turns out to be a correct diagnosis.

I much prefer to focus on self-respect. Self-regard. A conscious and responsible self-acceptance. Because there are times when I have had sufficient self-respect to recognize that I do not hold my behavior, my tone/attitude or my words in high esteem. Enough self-respect to admit when these things do not deserve to be esteemed.

The capacity and willingness to feel an authentic remorse, regret and disappointment in self is, ironically, a key ingredient to an eventual return to the only self-esteem worth having — a true celebration of a whole self discovered through the work of facing ourselves as we are.

Here’s a dirty little secret: If you argue backward from the implications of their behavior and choices, people generally have terrific self-esteem! The default posture of human beings is to think pretty darn highly of themselves.

I can hear it now: “Oh, you’re wrong, Steven! People are crippled with low opinions about themselves! They need affirmation. Validation. They need to hear they are loved and worthy and special!”

No, actually, they don’t. Feel-good speeches self-inflate modern neurotics . In fact, continuing in such speeches tends to become conscripted into the patient’s problem of a false sense of self-importance.

What people need is to tell the truth and then to live with integrity.

 
 
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Croix Bertelmann and George Tidal Brine reprise energy vamp[ire] time and again  –
 
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Decent compassionate folks who try to forge filial/familial bonds with these individuals find themselves quickly depleted of emotion, spirit and vitality.
 
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It’s  having the life sucked out of you by Count Dracula.
 
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Until they are surrounded by a critical mass of folks with consistent boundaries — and by boundaries here I mean an abject refusal to tolerate the absence of reciprocity and the demands of entitlement, the willingness to surrender these people radically to the consequences of their behaviors — I don’t hold out much hope they will look at themselves. Ever.
 
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“NeedToBeTheBest” has always been a cocktail of ego, insecurity, and envy.

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http://www.lvrj.com/blogs/kalas/Sorting_through_excellence_mediocrity_and_the_need_to_be_the_best.html

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the NeedToBeTheBest has NEVER been my friend. 

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The NeedToBeTheBest is like one of those ‘friends’ Tommy Shaw (Styx) sang about in the song Too Much Time on My Hands:  “I got dozens of friends, as long as I’m buying.”

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The NeedToBeTheBest is like the Queen’s mirror in Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.

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Does she seem to you like someone with Inner Peace?

* Inner Peace is a marriage of self-respect and self-acceptance yielding contentment. 

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For me, NeedToBeTheBest has always been a cocktail of ego, insecurity, and envy.

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An overprideful person “swallows one’s own stomach.” Such nature entails endless self-aggrandizement and vanity, and ensures incomprehensibility at the moment it compels authenticity/truth.

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It is true, the strength behind the leader is the person who mystifies me, the so-called unspoken one, like baby brother Andrew was to Peter [Bible].

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God has no use for pride, such that the meekest of the meek went on to lead, like Moses/Gideon.

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Look at King David. Lowly Nathan chastened shell-shocked David. Look at Joshua/etc. All unheralded/unsung heroes. Tremendous symbolism of “never judge a book by its cover.”

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Shower a rainbow for others

Exemplars like grassroot KingLit Ching provide us a deep mirror into the celebration of being human, of reaching into the collective human experience of a culture. And as sagacious Steven Kalas says, the death of a momentous exemplar is felt painfully and powerfully in our human psyche. The loss is real and meaningful. And so is the grief.

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The loss becomes even more powerful when the particular exemplar also carries your personal projections. That is, the exemplar’s life mirrors important pieces of your own psychic journey. Your own life dramas. You miss the beauty, the passion, the inspiration and hope that pour through an exemplar and into our lives especially during times of deepest social & financial misery. For this is when we need our exemplar the most. The capacity for gratitude is itself humility. Gratitude and humility are symbiotic. The only people who can say “thank you” are people who have learned of dependence and interdependence. The best of life is not a result of what shortfall we deserve, but the opposite, of simple yet profound indulgences and pleasures — a smile, a tear of joy.

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from angelheart & gorgeous Denise Takashima born 1953 –

Well, I totally appreciated your Shower a Rainbow for Others. Especially because you understand how devasted I was at the loss of my dad and later my mom.
Thank you. You helped me get through it! You were my rainbow!
aloha,
denise
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Artistic license which results in great movies like “The Last Samurai”  [courage/clean heart/prophecy — anticipate the future]   –

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_a_clef

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Film_%C3%A0_clef

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The spiritual warrior can be described as an archetype character on a journey for self discovery to benefit others.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warrior_code#Spiritual_warrior

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great Joseph Campbell [mythology thruout history]  –

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As the ultimate truth cannot be expressed in plain words, spiritual rituals and stories refer to it through the use of “metaphors,” a term Campbell used heavily and insisted on its proper meaning: In contrast with comparisons, which use the word like, metaphors pretend to a literal interpretation of what they are referring to, as in the sentence “Jesus is the Son of God” rather than “the relationship of man to God is like that of a son to a father.” According to Campbell, the Genesis myth from the Bible ought not be taken as a literal description of historical events happening in our current understanding of time and space, but as a metaphor for the rise of man’s cognitive consciousness as it evolved from a prior animal state.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Campbell#Monomyth

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Power_of_Myth

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Jesus always embraced the reproached, the outcasts, of society, knowing that these imperfect ones had a closer affinity with God, more so than the overproud decadent sentients in mansions & palaces. To Jesus, imperfection is beautiful, as we grow in God’s Holiness. His Holiness, is not outcome dependent for us on earth.

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And Jodi Hill’s  heartstopper missive –

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Learning The Hard Way

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You gave me a vision,

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Of what life was to be,

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You showed me the world,

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What I was to see.

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You promised me love,

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Said you’d always be there.

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To lend me a hand,

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To show me you care.

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We walked through the days,

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Never rushing our steps.

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We cherished our time,

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For our time …

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well spent.

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Then suddenly one day,

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You came and took your love away.

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As my heart began to sever,

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I knew you were gone forever.

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But not a tear did I cry.

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I rushed through the days,

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By myself, all alone.

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I cherished our memories,

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Although my angers grown.

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Then one day I thought of you,

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And sighed a bitter sigh.

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The long awaited sadness,

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Pierced my heart and …

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I cried.

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I cried for …

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the empty dreams,

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That people have these days.

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I cried because I had a dream,

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And …

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it slipped away.

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I cried because a love like ours,

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Was always meant to last.

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To endure throughout eternity,

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The present, …

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future,

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the past.

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Although I wouldn’t have changed it,

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In my heart

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I know it’s true.

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A lesson learned the hard way,

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Was the price of loving you, Malie.

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http://www.poemhunter.com/search/?q=learning+the+hard+way

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Wow!! Lamentation!!

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Writing is simplicity and contentment    –

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http://www.lvrj.com/blogs/kalas/Playing_with_words_is_fun_as_well_as_meaningful.html

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So, I have come up with three questions. First, why do you write? Second, what inspires you? Third, what do you do to overcome “writers’ block”? — B.F., San Francisco

Why do I write? I write for the same reason people ride roller coasters: It’s a rush. A flow. Movement and rhythm. It’s sensory. Aesthetic.

Words, for me, are like being 8 years old and having a huge bag of Legos. Every day my dictionary contains the same English words, just like every day the bag contains the same Legos. But today I have the chance to assemble them differently! And that’s fun for me.

Why do I write? I write because I love words. I hate jargon, but I love words. Yes, there are a lot of different ways to talk, but words matter.

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The right word can help us apprehend our lives in deeper, more intentional and more meaningful ways.

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There’s a reason the Hebrew verb dabar can mean either “to say” or “to do.” The Hebrew worldview speaks to the power of words: “And God said (emphasis mine), ‘Let there be light,’ and there was light.”

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Words have a creative force. Until we say “I love you,” there will be something about love that does not yet exist.

Am I a ‘word snob’? Oh, maybe. OK, probably. Dammit, yes! But I don’t think my demeanor is snobbish. More relentless and passionate.

I admire excellence and precision with language. I’m a harsh critic of the way American pop culture lazily conscripts the English language willy-nilly.

Americans tend to think of this — when they think about it at all — as another entitled “freedom.” A creative evolving of language. Most of the time it’s exactly the opposite. We broaden, distort and thereby cheapen the meaning of important words. This undermines meaningful discourse.

In the end, it’s worse than merely me not understanding what you mean to be saying; you no longer can accurately apprehend your own experience with anything like clarity and meaning.

For me, there is only one dictionary: The English Oxford Dictionary. Why? Because it alone is willing to guard the power and meaning of the English lexicon.

If I step out on my front porch, and shout “Labeedoowitz” loudly enough, the word “labeedoowitz” will show up in the next printing of the Rand McNally Dictionary.

OK, that’s hyperbole. But, I swear, coin the word “labeedoowitz” in a hit Broadway musical, and it will indeed be automatically included in the dictionary your son and daughter take to college.

I want to chase people to the dictionary. Regularly. I don’t apologize for using important words when just the right word matters.

I love it when I hear a new word. I interrupt people, right there on the spot. I say, “Ooh, I don’t know that word!” That’s a rush for me. A delicious feeling in my brain.

Why do I write? I write because I’m a compulsive communicator who loves to think out loud. Critical thinking turns me on. I like building an argument the way little boys like Tinker Toys, Lincoln Logs and Erector Sets.

I even have fun when the argument collapses. My best friends will tell you that I flat out love being wrong. Yep, when someone puts a finger clearly and accurately on the flaw in my argument, my brain stem hums as if I’d just bitten into a vanilla creme chocolate. If your argument can derail my argument, then I’m like a little kid with a new toy! I’ll race back home with your argument. Take it apart. Put it back together. Play with it. Integrate into my worldview, now changed.

Bring me a good argument, and I’ll ask you to marry me. (Uh, metaphorically speaking. I am so off the market.)

What inspires me? Life. Love. Tragedy. Suffering. Redemption. Evil. Beneficence. Truth. Beauty. Moral dilemmas. Mystery. The human journey inspires me, in virtually any form or circumstance.

What do I do to overcome “writers’ block”? Two things. First, I surround myself with deadlines imposed by others in authority over me. I’m inherently lazy. Not much of a self-starter. Without deadlines, I tend to sit around congratulating myself for thinking about all the brilliant things I could write. The thing that best “jump starts” my most creative self is the high expectations of others, especially if I have contractual obligations with them.

Second, I overcome “writers’ block” by writing. It’s like pumping the pump handle on a reluctant well. At some point I stop saying, “When I get a worthy idea, I’ll start writing.” No, I just sit down and start banging the keys, until a worthy idea shows up.

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Mammon [money is god]   —

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http://baselinescenario.com/2012/08/16/oblivious/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+BaselineScenario+%28The+Baseline+Scenario%29

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Morality is not a fixed set of Biblical laws, but a shifting intellectual framework that evolves over time to reflect each society.

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The meaning of marriage, and the way it has been performed, has changed tremendously over thousands of years. If the Cardinal wants tradition, then what could be more traditional that continuing the legacy of updating marriage to reflect our modern and humane society, where loving partners of any gender, creed or identity can choose to commit themselves in loving support of each another?

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http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/greg-jenner/cardinal-keith-obrien-gay-marriage_b_1321068.html

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http://www.lvrj.com/view/steven-kalas-victim-advocates-play-important-role-for-those-in-need-161886875.html

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Sometimes we are called to advocate for people in the aftermath of moral failure. (Being raped is not a moral failure.) We come not to deny or cover up the failure, nor necessarily to interfere with legal or interpersonal justice. We come to stand for the dignity of guilty human beings. Since you brought up your Catholic background, let’s put it in the language of the Scripture: “And if any man sin, we have an advocate with the Father …” (I John 2:1).

I think of Tim Robbins’ 1995 film “Dead Man Walking.” A chaplain nun is called to provide pastoral care to a death row prisoner, condemned to die for rape and murder. In the nun’s care, the condemned man ultimately confesses his crime. The nun waits with him in his final hours. She witnesses his execution. She attends his funeral. To the grave, she is his advocate, though members of her congregation criticize her, shame and condemn her. The victims’ surviving families feel betrayed by her.

After seeing the film, I preached a sermon in which I said that, were I ever to refuse such a ministry because I was afraid for my reputation … well, that I would no longer be worthy of the office of priest.

I have been an advocate for innocents. I have been an advocate for sinners. I’m intimately familiar with both  because both realities echo in the history of my own choices and life experience.

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There was no conspiracy between Kenoi & Kim to upend Yagong for mayor   —

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Kenoi  cannot  stand Kim.   There’s NO  conspiracy.   Jamae’s outfall over the last 3 weeks prior to our August 11 election day [including absentee voting during Jamae’s abomination] resulted in progressive voters losing faith in Dominic. 
 
 
 
 
 
These voters then crossed over to alternative candidate Kim.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Dominic doesn’t  have the confidence to build meritocracy by eliminating knucklehead nin-com-poops Jamae Kawauchi [who also  is a mediocre attorney] and misanthropist [gloomy anti-social lolo]  Offenbaker.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Dominic just doesn’t  get it that meritocracy starts in Dominic’s own camp!!!        Dominic is to blame for Kawauchi’s continued presence.    Failure  of  command responsibility    a la CEOs/
government leaders.    Dominic never apprehended  [got a grip on]  Dominic’s own weakness   — cronyism!!      Dominic bore out being a hypocrite.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
What is sad for us all in Hawai’i County is that Dominic unquestionably is the greatest lawmaker in our 107 year history of local county government   —  but Dominic was felled by Dominic’s own self-delusional hypocrisy of hiring & retaining both Jamae & Offenbaker.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
I must’ve told Dominic a hundred times & over to stay away from & then to dump blowhard peabrains Jamae & Offenbaker.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
I must’ve told Dominic a hundred times & over to have Keoki Kai take care of Dominic’s dealings with the media & the public [called public affairs].    Never happened.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Dominic failed to step up to administrative competence.

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88 Responses to alienation [I don’t belong] and estrangement [getting dumped because I don’t belong]

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  35. Pingback: In Obliquity, John Kay argues that the best things in life can only be pursued indirectly. I believe this is true for happiness: if you truly want to experience joy or meaning, you need to shift your attention away from joy or meaning, and toward projects

  36. Pingback: In Obliquity, John Kay argues that the best things in life can only be pursued indirectly. I believe this is true for happiness: if you truly want to experience joy or meaning, you need to shift your attention away from joy or meaning, and toward projects

  37. Pingback: sage Carl Gregg: The expectation of The Parable of the Mustard Seed would have been for the comparison to have been to a Cedar Tree, a symbol of empire in the ancient world. Among many Hebrew Scripture examples, consider Ezekiel 17. The expectation is for

  38. Pingback: Jesus’ death becomes even more powerful when this particular messiah also carries your personal projections. That is, the celebrity’s life mirrors important pieces of your own psychic journey. Your own life dramas. Jesus did this for me with h

  39. Pingback: Jesus’ death becomes even more powerful when this particular messiah also carries your personal projections. That is, the celebrity’s life mirrors important pieces of your own psychic journey. Your own life dramas. Jesus did this for me with h

  40. Pingback: Jesus’ death becomes even more powerful when this particular messiah also carries your personal projections. That is, the celebrity’s life mirrors important pieces of your own psychic journey. Your own life dramas. Jesus did this for me with h

  41. Pingback: Jesus’ death becomes even more powerful when this particular messiah also carries your personal projections. That is, the celebrity’s life mirrors important pieces of your own psychic journey. Your own life dramas. Jesus did this for me with h

  42. Pingback: Jesus’ death becomes even more powerful when this particular messiah also carries your personal projections. That is, the celebrity’s life mirrors important pieces of your own psychic journey. Your own life dramas. Jesus did this for me with h

  43. Pingback: Greatest sage Viktor Frankl: Happiness cannot be pursued; it must ensue, and it only does so as the unintended side effect of one’s personal dedication to a cause greater than oneself or as the by-product of one’s surrender to a person other t

  44. Pingback: Then Jesus cleansed the temple of everything evil about us — then in typical mob hysteria, we “cleansed” ourselves of Jesus via His Crucifixion | Curtis Narimatsu

  45. Pingback: In praise of nickname Stoner’s bridging the proverbial age gap — from Stoner age 43 to Peter age 66: “You are not an uptight jerk” (like other ultra-judgmental old farts!!) | Curtis Narimatsu

  46. Pingback: In praise of nickname Stoner’s bridging the proverbial generation gap — from Stoner age 43 to Peter age 66: “You are not an uptight jerk” (like other ultra-judgmental old farts!!) | Curtis Narimatsu

  47. Pingback: Ambivalence: The hair-thin line between being thrilled (Jesus our savior comes to our town Jerusalem) and being threatened (our own ambivalence — Jesus cleanses the temple of everything evil about ourselves — we feel threatened by Jesus reveal

  48. Pingback: Ambivalence: The hair-thin line between being thrilled (Jesus our savior comes to our town Jerusalem) and being threatened (our own ambivalence — Jesus cleanses the temple of everything evil about ourselves — we feel threatened by Jesus reveal

  49. Pingback: Love-hate dynamic of mob hysteria in praising, then killing Jesus — all within a week’s time | Curtis Narimatsu

  50. Pingback: Augustinian meme “Tear down the wall!!” (of fear/pretense/self-importance) — no, not from Reagan’s 1987 Berlin Wall crucible, but from Pink Floyd’s Roger Waters’ 1979 The Wall movie — tribute to my mentor Tea | Cu

  51. Pingback: Augustinian meme “Tear down the wall!!” (of fear/pretense/self-importance) — no, not from Reagan’s 1987 Berlin Wall crucible, but from Pink Floyd’s Roger Waters’ 1979 The Wall movie — tribute to my mentor Tea | Cu

  52. Pingback: Augustinian meme “Tear down the wall!!” (of fear/pretense/self-importance) — no, not from Reagan’s 1987 Berlin Wall crucible, but from Pink Floyd’s Roger Waters’ 1979 The Wall movie — tribute to my mentor Tea | Cu

  53. Pingback: “And how can man die better than facing fearful odds”. — Horatius (the phrase ‘Romans on the Bridge’ is used to refer to a valiant defense against impossible odds) | Curtis Narimatsu

  54. Pingback: “And how can man die better than facing fearful odds.” — Horatius (the phrase ‘Romans on the Bridge’ is used to refer to a valiant defense against impossible odds) | Curtis Narimatsu

  55. Pingback: So Jesus exposed our unlovely selves (Jesus’ cleansing of the temple by ridding it of our money-changers) — we didn’t have to kill Jesus — we could have sublimated our primal fears about our hypocritical nature — and instead

  56. Pingback: My life list: Listen more than one should speak. Engage with the world. This is where ideas come from. Such connections are vitality at its finest — in praise of connector Kim Pu’u born 1965 | Curtis Narimatsu

  57. Pingback: What if God just wants you to discover yourself? — Peter Enns | Curtis Narimatsu

  58. Pingback: We depraved humans are so fickle, to say the least — my recount of Jesus’ exposure of our mob hysteria 2,000 yrs. ago — nothing has changed in us since then — we still are a mob in senseless hysteria | Curtis Narimatsu

  59. Pingback: Aquinas is equidistant to early church father Augustine 400 yrs. before Aquinas — and to us 400 yrs. after 1200 AD Aquinas — yet, nothing has changed in us — we still are as depraved today as we were when we crucified Jesus in our sensel

  60. Pingback: Aquinas is equidistant to early church father Augustine 800 yrs. before Aquinas — and to us 800 yrs. after 1200 AD Aquinas — yet, nothing has changed in us — we still are as depraved today as we were when we crucified Jesus in our sensel

  61. Pingback: Aquinas is equidistant to early church father Augustine 800 yrs. before Aquinas — and to us 800 yrs. after 1200 AD Aquinas — yet, nothing has changed in us — we still are as depraved today as we were when we crucified Jesus in our sensel

  62. Pingback: Nothing has changed in us — we still are as depraved today as we were when we crucified Jesus in our senseless mob hysteria — Aquinas is equidistant to early church father Augustine 800 yrs. before Aquinas — and to us 800 yrs. after 1200

  63. Pingback: We depraved humans of immense despair — nothing has changed in us — we still are as depraved today as we were when we crucified Jesus in our senseless mob hysteria — Aquinas is equidistant to early church father Augustine 800 yrs. before

  64. Pingback: We depraved humans of immense despair — nothing has changed in us — we still are as depraved today as we were when we crucified Jesus in our senseless mob hysteria — Aquinas is equidistant to early church father Augustine 800 yrs. before

  65. Pingback: We depraved humans of immense despair — nothing has changed in us — we still are as depraved today as we were when we crucified Jesus in our senseless mob hysteria — Aquinas is equidistant to early church father Augustine 800 yrs. before

  66. Pingback: We are depraved humans steeped in immense despair — nothing has changed in us — we still are as depraved today as we were when we crucified Jesus in our senseless mob hysteria — Aquinas is equidistant to early church father Augustine 800

  67. Pingback: Jesus’ mind-blowing reversal/frustration of all expectations — turning common-sense ideas upside down, confounding us all — spark our deepest imaginative opposites/impossibilities, to say the least!! | Curtis Narimatsu

  68. Pingback: Jesus’ mind-blowing reversal/frustration of all expectations — turning common-sense ideas upside down, confounding us all — Jesus sparks our beautifully deepest, imaginative “opposites/impossibilities of thought,” to say the

  69. Pingback: Jesus’ mind-blowing “huli ‘au” (upside down) overturning of this world of our flesh — Jesus violated every conceivable tradition when it came to His associations with the marginalized of Jewish society. He infuriated the Phar

  70. Pingback: Jesus’ mind-blowing “huli ‘au” (upside down) overturning of this world of our flesh — Jesus violated every conceivable tradition when it came to His associations with the marginalized of Jewish society. He infuriated the Phar

  71. Pingback: Mind-blowing Jesus stands inexplicably before us, and Jesus turns common-sense ideas upside down, confounding us all! Dedicated to authentic Ri-in!! | Curtis Narimatsu

  72. Pingback: Life is full of reversals of expectations, baby!! Dedicated to my little girl Staycie age 40 — my separation anxiety from my baby girl when she turned 18 & left home to live on her own turned out to be her greatest crossover to independence R

  73. Pingback: Hawaii’s greatest modern wayfinder Rev. Hung Wai Ching (1905-2002) alter ego Rev. Reinhold Niebuhr (1892-1971) — Niebuhr’s immensely popular Serenity Prayer: “Taking, as Jesus did, this sinful world as it is, not as I would have it

  74. Pingback: Calvinism, we keep being reminded, was the faith of the Puritans who settled most early American colonies, and its teachings are reflected in founding documents. Since the U.S. Constitution is so preoccupied with checks and balances, some old-timers found

  75. Pingback: Calvinism, we keep being reminded, was the faith of the Puritans who settled most early American colonies, and its teachings are reflected in founding documents. Since the U.S. Constitution is so preoccupied with checks and balances, some old-timers found

  76. Pingback: To love and be loved are what life is all about | Curtis Narimatsu

  77. Pingback: In praise of Pastor Jay Hernandez — Colossians 1:20 – And having made peace through the blood of the cross, that all beings in heaven and on earth would be reconciled or brought back to God. | Curtis Narimatsu

  78. Pingback: In praise of Pastor Jay Hernandez — Colossians (phonetic pronunciation: kuh-LAH-shuhnz) 1:20 – And having made peace through the blood of the cross, that all beings in heaven and on earth would be reconciled or brought back to God. | Curtis Narima

  79. Pingback: I’m here to love and be loved | Curtis Narimatsu

  80. Pingback: In praise of Pastors Calisto & Violet Mateo of Our God Reigns Ministry at 1289 Kilauea Ave. Hilo Suite H, phone (808) 961-6540 | Curtis Narimatsu

  81. Pingback: 1 Peter 4:8 — Love covers a multitude of sins — Center of Grace — or in the secular sense, forgive yourself for what is not in your power to do | Curtis Narimatsu

  82. Pingback: luck of the draw (bad or good) — forgive yourself for what is not in your power to do — Steven Kalas | Curtis Narimatsu

  83. Pingback: Nobody comes to therapy who hasn’t lost something. The heart is injured. Limping. Constrained by psychic adhesions. Aching, either obviously or just behind the curtain of consciousness. The therapeutic relationship is the MRI. It reveals what’s torn.

  84. Pingback: Nobody comes to therapy who hasn’t lost something. The heart is injured. Limping. Constrained by psychic adhesions. Aching, either obviously or just behind the curtain of consciousness. The therapeutic relationship is the MRI. It reveals what’s torn.

  85. Pingback: Nobody comes to therapy who hasn’t lost something. The heart is injured. Limping. Constrained by psychic adhesions. Aching, either obviously or just behind the curtain of consciousness. The therapeutic relationship is the MRI. It reveals what’s torn.

  86. Pingback: To love and to be loved are mystical desires a la Carl Jung’s archetypes (Jung’s forebearers were mystics Plato, Apostle Paul, & Augustine) | Curtis Narimatsu

  87. Pingback: The young man with terminal cancer was going to die quicker than he thought, and he was very depressed about this. And of course he hadn’t gotten to make his mark, and he had this conversation with this young woman. And the young woman said, “No,

  88. Pingback: Modern society’s devolution and self-absorption — we need symbols which participate in the things they represent | Curtis Narimatsu

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