In praise of Gautam Mukunda’s extraordinary study “Indispensable: When leaders really matter”

http://www.booktv.org/Watch/13918/After+Words+Gautam+Mukunda+Indispensable+When+Leaders+Really+Matter+hosted+by+Richard+Brookhiser+National+Review.aspx

*

 go to timeclock 53:30 for the final 10 minutes of this terrific program.

*

What makes a leader indispensable?  [a positive extremist who came out of nowhere like Abraham Lincoln who preserved our Union, compared to mottled/mosaic conformist Thomas Jefferson, where anyone else in the top echelon of government also would’ve implemented the Louisiana Purchase]

*

Can an individual leader really make or break an organization?  [Yes, such as negative extremist Woodrow Wilson] 

*

Is it possible to predict which leaders will be successful?     [Yes, 90% of the time, since top leaders are twins of each other, but absolutely no in the other 10% of the time with extremists such as positive/right/correct/Lincoln & negative/wrong Woodrow Wilson]

Listen to Harvard Business School Assistant Professor [actually, magnificent political scientist] Gautam Mukunda, discuss:

  • The characteristics of effective leaders
  • How to identify the best—and worst—leaders at your organization
  • How much impact one leader can have on an organization
  • How to apply the model used in his book to do things like select your next CEO or become a better leader

http://www.harvardbusiness.org/virtual-seminars/what-makes-leader-indispensable

*

To GOP genesis Seward of 1860, Lincoln was a hapless hopeless fella whistling in the wind [futile endeavor]  — yet, Seward came to revere Lincoln in very short time because of Lincoln’s superhuman metaphysical leadership decisions, such as having an unarmed food convoy deploy to Fort Sumpter, thereby uniting the North against the secessionist Southern States.    Lincoln’s actual depressive state somehow accorded Lincoln extraordinary decisionmaking powers/acumen which ran counter [counter-intuitive][reversal/frustration/confounding of expectations like Jesus’ Pericopes/Parables]  to the best & the brightest minds of 1860 [such as self-anointed “shadow President” Seward in Seward’s ego longing for singular power/authority vs. Lincoln].

*

Deborah Kepola Li’ikapeka [little Elizabeth after her mom Elizabeth, Kepola being the oldest of 5 children] Lee of Keaukaha born 1959 is my Lincoln of the Millennium for her sublime [greatness beyond all possibility of calculation, measurement or imitation —   e.g. God’s Revelation as true myth]   immutable nature/virtue.     Her birth name is Biblical Deborah, the great warrior and the only female judge mentioned in the Bible.     http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deborah

*

Deborah Kepola brought her ohana/family member Henry ‘Opukaha’ia home in 1993 from Conn., where he died in 1818 175 yrs. before his actual return to his Hawai’i home —  like the 400 yrs. before Biblical Joseph was returned to Canaan  http://biblehub.com/commentaries/guzik/commentaries/0150.htm  with Henry we find God’s promises of liberation & salvation in Hawai’i.  Of course, Henry changed the face of Hawai’i history for the better [Congregational Christianity introduced — propagating schooling/public health improvement/compassion for the commoners-salt of the earth/etc.], not to mention Henry facilitated emancipation for African-Americans [political icons Adams ohana/Henry Clay attentive to Conn. Congregationalists/Abraham Lincoln was Clay’s apostle/etc.].

*

*

Henry Opukahaia’s New Creation cometh to the Hawaiian Islands (helping one another, no matter the social class/stigma)   —

*
2 Cor. 5:17 A New Creation — the Old has gone, the New has come.

*

1 Cor. 15:10 Grace gives us the desire and the power from God to do His will — to give life a chance!!

*

Biblical Paul’s recitation on inner Grace – being regenerated, called, sanctified — a new creation!!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Divine_grace#Christianity

*
Galatians 6:2 lovingly take on another person’s burden — mutual help

*
*

Kepola on her ohana/family member Henry ‘Opukaha’ia  —

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=byWd2ak4s3E

*

*

*

*

*

*

https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2012/02/28/sublime/

*

Scripture as eternal true myth [according to a believer] per processing a la Jesus:

Turning common-sense ideas upside down, confounding the expectations of His audience: He/Jesus preached of “Heaven’s imperial rule” [traditionally translated as “Kingdom of God“] as being already present but unseen; He depicts God as a loving father; He squares shoulders with outsiders and criticizes insiders.   Christ evokes not simply an apocalyptic eschatology/end-time, but more critically a sapiential eschatology, which encourages all of God’s children to repair the world.     Since Christ lived and preached in an oral culture, scholars expect that short, memorable stories or phrases are more likely to be historical and factual.

*

Irony:   Based on several important narrative parables [such as the Parable of the Good Samaritan], scholars decided that irony, reversal, and frustration of expectations were characteristic of Christ’s style.   Does a pericope/concise passage illustrate opposites or impossibilities?   If it does, it’s more likely to be authentic.   For example, “love your enemies.”    
*
Not just the Parables but the  beatitudes feature the dramatic presentation and reversal of expectations that are characteristic of Christ.  The poor are accepted as constituting the primary recipients of the Good News and, therefore, as having an inherent capacity of understanding it better than anyone else. That’s pretty threatening for any comfortable Christian. For not only do we have to help the poor, not only do we have to advocate on their behalf, we also have to see them as perhaps understanding God better than we do!  But that’s not a new idea:  It goes back to Jesus. The poor, the sick and the outcast “got” him better than the wealthy did.   Perhaps because there was less standing between the poor and God.   Less stuff [pride].   Maybe that’s why Jesus said in the Gospel of Matthew, “You will have treasure in heaven, and follow me.” Like I said, pretty disturbing, then and now. It’s hardly “the opposite of the Gospel,” as ousted Fox News pundit Glenn Beck said.

*

*

*

*

On real time forgiveness, note the instance of the man who accidentally spills a bowl of  chicken soup on another man.   The other man is aghast, then lets out the amazing Grace of a punchline   –  “Well, at least I love the comforting sense of chicken soup!!”   Wow!!

*

Jesus always embraced the reproached,
the outcasts, of society, knowing that
these imperfect ones had a closer affinity
with God, more so than the overproud
sentients full of contemptuous opinions and

scathing comments vs. others.
To Jesus, imperfection is beautiful, as we
grow in God’s Holiness. His Holiness, is
not outcome dependent for us on earth.

*

*

*

*

*

*

An interior contemplative “soul” is valued a la Deborah Kepola Lee, Lincoln, Jesus   —

*

my mythic hero Frankie Starlight [Alan Pentony] dares to reach for the stars

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TV1EYBnPMEY

*

Alan Pentony [with Anne Parillaud]

*

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frankie_Starlight

Plot

Frank Bois writes a successful first novel and finds himself looking back over his life. His mother Bernadette (Parillaud) was a French woman who, after the death of her friends and family in World War II, hid herself aboard an Allied war ship heading to Ireland, where she exchanged sexual favors for silence among the soldiers who found her on board. A nice customs agent, Jack Kelly (Byrne), allowed Bernadette to enter Ireland illegally, and they soon became a couple lovers, even though she was already pregnant from one of the soldiers from the ship.

Bernadette soon gave birth to young Frankie (Pentony), who suffers from dwarfism. As he grew older, Frankie develops romantic feelings for Jack’s daughter Emma (Cates), who does not share his feelings, while Jack teaches astronomy to Frankie. Eventually, Bernadette meets Terry Klout (Dillon), an American soldier she had met on the war ship, who offers to marry her. Bernadette and Frankie go with Terry to his home in Texas, but both mother and son feel like they don’t belong there, so they return to the Irish home they loved. An older Bernadette eventually committed suicide, and Frank used his life as source material for his writing.

*

*

*

*

*

“Pathetic,” in its literal meaning, comes from the Greek word pathos.

*

To enter the pathos is to surrender to all that is tragic, absurd, lost, despairing, meaningless. The word “pathetic” is not a derision; it’s an observation.   The deepest most humbling observation.

http://www.lvrj.com/living/explanations-fail-to-explain-what-happened-in-newtown-184599551.html

*

*

*

Empathy means literally “to enter the pathos.”

*

Compassion means literally “to suffer with.”

*

We bandy these words about too easily. It’s not all that frequently we find people who will really do what are implied in those words. I cherish the people I do find.

*

I no longer lift bread and wine. I lift broken, poured out people.   Folks like myself.    My meaning in life is to help others find their meaning.

*

http://www.lvrj.com/living/culture-s-approach-to-suffering-only-prolongs-pain-129608658.html

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

All current leaders are weaker than their predecessors and there’s a greater potential for upheaval.  So says award-winning journalist Moises Naim as he details the changing nature of governmental and economic power.  He talks with the editor of the Washington Post’s On Leadership section, Lillian Cunningham.

http://www.booktv.org/Watch/14296/After+Words+Moises+Naim+The+End+of+Power+From+Boardrooms+to+Battlefields+and+Churches+to+States+Why+Being+In+Charge+Isnt+What+It+Used+to+Be+hosted+by+Lillian+Cunningham.aspx

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Utter idiot Dick Cheney   –

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/06/opinion/dowd-repent-dick-cheney.html?ref=maureendowd&_r=0

*

“If I had to do it over again,” the 72-year-old says chillingly of his reign of error, “I’d do it over in a minute.”      

Cheney, who came from a family of Wyoming Democrats, says his conservative bent was strengthened watching the anti-Vietnam war protests at the University of Wisconsin, where he was pursuing a doctorate and dodging the draft.      

“I can remember the mime troupe meeting there and the guys that ran around in white sheets with the entrails of pigs, dripping blood,” he said. Maybe if he’d paid more attention to the actual war, conducted with a phony casus belli in a country where we did not understand the culture, he wouldn’t have propelled America into two more Vietnams.      

The documentary doesn’t get to the dark heart of the matter about the man with the new heart.      

Did he change, after the shock to his body of so many heart procedures and the shock to his mind of 9/11? Or was he the same person, patiently playing the courtier, once code-named “Backseat” by the Secret Service, until he found the perfect oblivious frontman who would allow him to unleash his harebrained, dictatorial impulses?      

Talking to Cutler in his deep headmaster’s monotone, Cheney dispenses with the fig leaf of “we.” He no longer feigns deference to W., whom he now disdains for favoring Condi over him in the second term, and for not pardoning “Cheney’s Cheney,” Scooter Libby.      

“I had a job to do,” he said.      

Continuing: “I got on the telephone with the president, who was in Florida, and told him not to be at one location where we could both be taken out.” Cheney kept W. flying aimlessly in the air on 9/11 while he and Lynne left on a helicopter for a secure undisclosed location, leaving Washington in a bleak, scared silence, with no one reassuring the nation in those first terrifying hours.      

“I gave the instructions that we’d authorize our pilots to take it out,” he says, referring to the jet headed to Washington that crashed in a Pennsylvania field. He adds: “After I’d given the order, it was pretty quiet. Everybody had heard it, and it was obviously a significant moment.”      

This guy makes Al Haig look like a shrinking violet.      

When they testified together before the 9/11 Commission, W. and Cheney kept up a pretense that in a previous call, the president had authorized the vice president to give a shoot-down order if needed. But the commission found “no documentary evidence for this call.”      

In his memoir, W. described feeling “blindsided” again and again. In this film, the blindsider is the éminence grise who was supposed to shore up the untested president. The documentary reveals the Iago lengths that Cheney went to in order to manipulate the unprepared junior Bush. Vice had learned turf fighting from a maniacal master of the art, his mentor Donald Rumsfeld.      

When he was supposed to be vetting vice presidential candidates, Cheney was actually demanding so much material from them that there was always something to pick on. He filled W.’s head with stories about conflicts between presidents and vice presidents sparked by the vice president’s ambition, while protesting that he himself did not want the job.      

In an unorthodox move, he ran the transition, hiring all his people, including Bush senior’s nemesis, Rummy, and sloughing off the Friends of George; then he gave himself an all-access pass.      

He was always goosing up W.’s insecurities so he could take advantage of them. To make his crazy and appallingly costly detour from Osama to Saddam, and cherry-pick his fake case for invading Iraq, he played on W.’s fear of being lampooned as a wimp, as his father had been.      

But after Vice kept W. out of the loop on the Justice Department’s rebellion against Cheney’s illegal warrantless domestic spying program, the relationship was ruptured. It was too late to rein in the feverish vice president, except to tell him he couldn’t bomb a nuclear plant in the Syrian desert.      

“Condi was on the wrong side of all those issues,” Cheney rumbled to Cutler.      

Cheney still hearts waterboarding. “Are you going to trade the lives of a number of people because you want to preserve your honor?” he asked, his voice dripping with contempt.      

“I don’t lie awake at night thinking, gee, what are they going to say about me?” he sums up.      

They’re going to say you were a misguided powermonger who, in a paranoid spasm, led this nation into an unthinkable calamity. Sleep on that.  

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

“Apples” and oranges [miscue via Steve Jobs’ persona]   —

*

http://baselinescenario.com/2013/02/25/maybe-it-was-apple/

*

Maybe It Was Apple

*

By James Kwak

A little over a year ago, iconic but fading department store J.C. Penney hired Ron Johnson as CEO. Johnson was head of retail operations at Apple—which, in case you didn’t know it, is just about the most successful retailer in the world by a bevy of metrics.

According  to today’s Wall Street Journal article, Johnson quickly eliminated coupons and most sales at J.C. Penney.

“Johnson bristled when a colleague suggested that he test his new no-discounts strategy at a few stores. . . . ‘We didn’t test at Apple,’ the executive recalled Mr. Johnson . . . saying.”

Well, yeah. Apple doesn’t discount because they sell stuff that people really, really want and that they can’t get anyplace else. And they don’t test because Steve Jobs refused to. At Penney? Sales have fallen by about 30 percent.

This doesn’t mean Johnson is stupid, or that he’s going to fail as CEO. Apparently he has partially reversed his early decision, which is a good sign. But it brings up a common feature of external CEO hires. Companies in a perceived crisis often look outside for a new leader, hoping for a superman (or -woman) who can singlehandedly turn around the organization. Not completely illogically, they tend to look for people at successful companies. “Make us more like X,” they pray. In Penney’s case, X = Apple.

There are two important questions they tend not to ask, however. First, was Apple successful because of Johnson, or was he just along for the ride? Yes, he was the main man behind the Apple Store (although, according to Walter Isaacson’s book, Steve Jobs was really the genius behind everything). But was the success of the Apple Store just a consequence of the success of the iPhone?

Second, even if Johnson was a major contributor to Apple’s success, how much of his abilities are transferable to and relevant to J.C. Penney? There’s a big difference between selling the most lusted-after products on the planet and selling commodities in second-rate malls. When someone has been successful in one context, how much information does that really give you about how he will perform in a new environment?

Maybe Johnson will turn out to be a great pick; it’s just too early to tell. But the general problem is undeniable. In the rush to anoint a charismatic savior, hiring committees, search firms, and boards substitute leaps of faith for cold rational inferences, fastening on the bits and pieces of a job candidate’s resume that play to their desire for a superman and overlooking the vast amount they just don’t know (see Rakesh Khurana for more). And this is one reason why external CEO hires tend, in the aggregate, to do worse than people promoted from within, who have the benefit of years of insider knowledge and precisely relevant expertise.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Again, reprise indispensable leader Kepola/Deborah Li’ikapeka Lee, who brought ohana Henry ‘Opukaha’ia home to Hawai’i.

*

http://www.obookiah.com/Obookiah.com/Ka_Ohe_Ola_Hou.html

*

 

Ka ‘Ohe Ola Hou Inc. – the Bamboo Lives Again

 

Ka ‘Ohe Ola Hou Inc. – the Bamboo Lives Again – is a Big Island-based organization seeking to educate Hawaiians and others about the strong Christian values Opukaha’ia held.

 

The organization was formed by Deborah Li’ikapeka Lee of Ahuhui O Opukaha’ia to fulfill her vision of establishing Opukaha’ia as a role model for Native Hawaiians, especially students. [italics mine]

 

Ahuhui O Opukaha’ia organized the return of Henry’s remains from Cornwall, Connecticut to South Kona. On August 15, 1993 Opukaha’ia was buried in the graveyard of Kahikolu Church U.C.C. at Kepulu (Napo’opo’o).

 

Ka ‘Ohe Ola Hou’s four main objectives are:

 

1)  That indigenous Hawaiians can take full ownership of this Hawaiian son and all he envisions

…so that the true history of Hawaii can be made known [my note: that an indigenous Native Hawaiian introduced via his legacy concepts of equal opportunity/humility/compassion/patience/generosity/social justice via Matthew 5-Isaiah 58-Micah 6:8/etc.]

 

2)  To see that students have “access in their schools and libraries to sufficient curriculum and materials so that Opukaha’ia story can help bring self-esteem, future and hope.”   [propagating/sharing Henry’s real life action hero legacy will be difficult so long as fees are charged to learn about Henry e.g. Lyman House Museum “entry fees”  — You Tube is free & easily accessible via public library computers/etc.  — Na Leo community TV has a restrictive schedule not accessible to everyone all the time — to share Henry’s unmatched odyssey of discovery is best advocated via democratic Bentham/Mill utilitarianism’s method — greatest good for the greatest number of people ergo You Tube  http://www.probe.org/site/c.fdKEIMNsEoG/b.4224805/k.B792/Utilitarianism_The_Greatest_Good_for_the_Greatest_Number.htm

3)   To promote “a second great awakening” – a contemporary release of native Hawaiians to launch Opukaha’ia’s Vision of sharing the gospel of Jesus Christ to the Pacific peoples and beyond.”

 

4)  To recognize our time and place in Hawaii’s history in seeing the events of Opukaha’ia’s return and the attempts to restore the Monarchy through the Sovereignty Movement and being sensitive to our involvement therewith.   [church & state are separate even under Monarchy rule — Hawai’i never was a theocracy]

 

The initial meeting of Ka ‘Ohe Ola Hou was held in Kona to organize the group as a nonprofit organization and deal with other proposals, including establishing scholarships in Opukaha’ia’s name.

 

In the future, Ka ‘Ohe Ola Hou wants to establish a Henry Opukaha’ia Day as a state holiday and erect a historical monument in his honor.    [secular/temporal recognition of Henry’s concepts of social justice e.g. Matthew 5 — blessed are the meek for they shall inherit the Earth & the Kingdom of Heaven/Isaiah 58 — feed the hungry-clothe the naked-shelter the homeless-comfort the afflicted/Micah 6:8 — have mercy/be just/walk humbly]

 

Deborah Li’ikapeka Lee is a seventh-generation descendant of Opukaha’ia, and is

executive director of Ka ‘Ohe Ola Hou.

 

Communications to Ka ‘Ohe Ola Hou should be mailed to:

 

290 Andrews Avenue, Hilo, Hawaii 96720

*

*

*

*

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

38 Responses to In praise of Gautam Mukunda’s extraordinary study “Indispensable: When leaders really matter”

  1. Pingback: I will die a good death — as my greatest hero Viktor Frankl said, “having been” is the surest kind of being, though it cannot inspire envy [life is full of suffering]. | Curtis Narimatsu

  2. Pingback: Writing and eventually dying a good death — expressing & sharing love to the end | Curtis Narimatsu

  3. Pingback: dealing with being rejected/forsaken — the upside/redemptive way to deal with not being chosen | Curtis Narimatsu

  4. Pingback: If we’re going to write, it is because we have a desire to express ourselves, even if we don’t quite understand what we wish to say. It might just be an inner yearning, but by making the choice to engage in the process rather than the result, our work

  5. Pingback: If we’re going to write, it is because we have a desire to express ourselves, even if we don’t quite understand what we wish to say. It might just be an inner yearning, but by making the choice to engage in the process rather than the result, our work

  6. Pingback: If we’re going to write, it is because we have a desire to express ourselves, even if we don’t quite understand what we wish to say. It might just be an inner yearning, but by making the choice to engage in the process rather than the result, our work

  7. Pingback: If we’re going to write, it is because we have a desire to express ourselves, even if we don’t quite understand what we wish to say. It might just be an inner yearning, but by making the choice to engage in the process rather than the result, our work

  8. Pingback: If we’re going to write, it is because we have a desire to express ourselves, even if we don’t quite understand what we wish to say. It might just be an inner yearning, but by making the choice to engage in the process rather than the result, our work

  9. Pingback: If we’re going to write, it is because we have a desire to express ourselves, even if we don’t quite understand what we wish to say. It might just be an inner yearning, but by making the choice to engage in the process rather than the result, our work

  10. Pingback: If we’re going to write, it is because we have a desire to express ourselves, even if we don’t quite understand what we wish to say. It might just be an inner yearning, but by making the choice to engage in the process rather than the result, our work

  11. Pingback: If we’re going to write, it is because we have a desire to express ourselves, even if we don’t quite understand what we wish to say. It might just be an inner yearning, but by making the choice to engage in the process rather than the result, our work

  12. Pingback: Thriving, learning, & having wisdom are about getting up each morning with intention, clarity, & commitment to seek & nurture connection along life’s healthy, healing path of inner nourishment & peace of mind | Curtis Narimatsu

  13. Pingback: In praise of Kathie Melocco and her ontic, the master Viktor Frankl: Have you reached a turning point in your life? | Curtis Narimatsu

  14. Pingback: Ante Cuvalo: Stipo Sosic– The Road to Hell and Back — Viktor Frankl’s analog | Curtis Narimatsu

  15. Pingback: Finding meaning in suffering a la great master Viktor Frankl | Curtis Narimatsu

  16. Pingback: What’s the lesson in your narrative? — Kare Anderson | Curtis Narimatsu

  17. Pingback: A practicing Catholic, Stephen Colbert asked record-breaking author Dan Brown, “Did you write this to familiarize yourself with where you’ll be when you die?” | Curtis Narimatsu

  18. Pingback: am not concerned if you believe in the resurrection. But I challenge you to practice resurrection. What within you aches to be reborn?Who around you desperately needs renewed hope, a new word of encouragement, a new perspective, a new lease on life?Or as

  19. Pingback: Jesus’ death becomes even more powerful when this particular messiah also carries your personal projections. That is, the celebrity’s life mirrors important pieces of your own psychic journey. Your own life dramas. Jesus did this for me with h

  20. Pingback: Like most writers, I use bits and pieces from my life in my writing. I start with character because that’s the crucial part. I base my characters on bits and pieces of people I either knew or know now. I do that, realizing we’re all capable of

  21. Pingback: I draw water from the well of my life’s work, and create stories. — Mark Rubinstein | Curtis Narimatsu

  22. Pingback: Then Jesus cleansed the temple of everything evil about us — then in typical mob hysteria, we “cleansed” ourselves of Jesus via His Crucifixion | Curtis Narimatsu

  23. Pingback: In praise of nickname Stoner’s bridging the proverbial age gap — from Stoner age 43 to Peter age 66: “You are not an uptight jerk” (like other ultra-judgmental old farts!!) | Curtis Narimatsu

  24. Pingback: In praise of nickname Stoner’s bridging the proverbial generation gap — from Stoner age 43 to Peter age 66: “You are not an uptight jerk” (like other ultra-judgmental old farts!!) | Curtis Narimatsu

  25. Pingback: Ambivalence: The hair-thin line between being thrilled (Jesus our savior comes to our town Jerusalem) and being threatened (our own ambivalence — Jesus cleanses the temple of everything evil about ourselves — we feel threatened by Jesus reveal

  26. Pingback: Ambivalence: The hair-thin line between being thrilled (Jesus our savior comes to our town Jerusalem) and being threatened (our own ambivalence — Jesus cleanses the temple of everything evil about ourselves — we feel threatened by Jesus reveal

  27. Pingback: Jesus’ mind-blowing “huli ‘au” (upside down) overturning of this world of our flesh — Jesus violated every conceivable tradition when it came to His associations with the marginalized of Jewish society. He infuriated the Phar

  28. Pingback: Mind-blowing Jesus stands inexplicably before us, and Jesus turns common-sense ideas upside down/”huli ‘au,” confounding us all! Dedicated to authentic Ri-in!! | Curtis Narimatsu

  29. Pingback: Life is full of reversals of expectations, baby!! Dedicated to my little girl Staycie age 40 — my separation anxiety from my baby girl when she turned 18 & left home to live on her own turned out to be her greatest crossover to independence R

  30. Pingback: Hawaii’s greatest modern wayfinder Rev. Hung Wai Ching (1905-2002) alter ego Rev. Reinhold Niebuhr (1892-1971) — Niebuhr’s immensely popular Serenity Prayer: “Taking, as Jesus did, this sinful world as it is, not as I would have it

  31. Pingback: Calvinism, we keep being reminded, was the faith of the Puritans who settled most early American colonies, and its teachings are reflected in founding documents. Since the U.S. Constitution is so preoccupied with checks and balances, some old-timers found

  32. Pingback: Calvinism, we keep being reminded, was the faith of the Puritans who settled most early American colonies, and its teachings are reflected in founding documents. Since the U.S. Constitution is so preoccupied with checks and balances, some old-timers found

  33. Pingback: To love and be loved are what life is all about | Curtis Narimatsu

  34. Pingback: I’m here to love and be loved | Curtis Narimatsu

  35. Pingback: Nobody comes to therapy who hasn’t lost something. The heart is injured. Limping. Constrained by psychic adhesions. Aching, either obviously or just behind the curtain of consciousness. The therapeutic relationship is the MRI. It reveals what’s torn.

  36. Pingback: Nobody comes to therapy who hasn’t lost something. The heart is injured. Limping. Constrained by psychic adhesions. Aching, either obviously or just behind the curtain of consciousness. The therapeutic relationship is the MRI. It reveals what’s torn.

  37. Pingback: To love and to be loved are mystical desires a la Carl Jung’s archetypes (Jung’s forebearers were mystics Plato, Apostle Paul, & Augustine) | Curtis Narimatsu

  38. Pingback: The young man with terminal cancer was going to die quicker than he thought, and he was very depressed about this. And of course he hadn’t gotten to make his mark, and he had this conversation with this young woman. And the young woman said, “No,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s