I will die a good death — as my greatest hero Viktor Frankl said, “having been” is the surest kind of being, though it cannot inspire envy [life is full of suffering].

I love and am loved.   I want to love and want to be loved.   I am true to my heart and I lead with my heart.    I will die a good death.    No one but me decides my attitude when I die.   

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Like basketball/football, I process my life in 4 quarters of 20 years each.    The first quarter was schooling in preparation for the workplace.    The second quarter was raising a family.   The third quarter was paying down the sundry bills which came with a life full of activity.   My final & fourth quarter consists of retirement & emotional preparation of inevitable death.    I will die a good death.  

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I always have an immutable enduring image of Wainaku Pua Lane’s Albert Pacheco Sr. as he rested his head in his lap while sitting on the shoreline boulder by our Wailuku river “singing bridge” astride our ubiquitous lighthouse  — contemplating his own death of terminal cancer while still in his middle ages.     Ohhh so sad.   For the first 3 quarters of my frenetic “frantic” life  — I never “got” [captured] the feel of mortality that coursed thru Albert’s soul as he engaged the end of his life.    Now I “get it.”    I will die a good death.   I am at peace with myself.     Albert is my hero.     Albert’s example is my example.     Die a good death.    No one owns my attitude with my death.   Life’s journey in deepest selfhood always in the end is walked alone.  

https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2012/12/14/because-in-the-end-great-journeys-of-integrity-are-walked-alone-sage-steven-kalas/

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Albert walked wondrously to his inner peace.   Albert was the greatest husband, father, & friend.    And the humblest!     Albert is my hero.

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Hope Kiko Nakamura of downtown Hilo’s Kino’ole St. also is my hero.   A native of Japan, she is Amaterasu, my sun goddess who is kindness personified.    Nihonjin are very bigoted because of our racial homogeneity [master race psychomania], so to speak.    Not Hope Maki, who is the most loving person around — to people of all colors, social classes, manners, ages.     Also, I have never seen an older woman any unthinkably prettier than Hope Maki — yet she is our humblest person, singularly divine like Albert Pacheco.     Hope Maki and Albert Pacheco are my immortal heroes — forever inspiring — every generation should observe, study, and learn from these 2 sublime archetypes [greatness beyond all possibility of calculation, measurement or imitation][like Jesus & like Scripture’s Pericopes/Parables, my dynamic duo above exemplifies such confounding deepest Truths/frustration-reversal of conventional expectations — huli’au/upside down outcomes but the righteous results, so to speak].      Their interior contemplative humblest nature undyingly are for the ages, and they inspire me to no end.   

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2012/12/26/in-praise-of-gautam-mukundas-extraordinary-study-indispensable-when-leaders-really-matter/

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2012/02/28/sublime/

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Scripture as eternal true myth [according to a believer] per processing a la Jesus:

Turning common-sense ideas upside down, confounding the expectations of His audience: He/Jesus preached of “Heaven’s imperial rule” [traditionally translated as “Kingdom of God“] as being already present but unseen; He depicts God as a loving father; He squares shoulders with outsiders and criticizes insiders.   Christ evokes not simply an apocalyptic eschatology/end-time, but more critically a sapiential eschatology, which encourages all of God’s children to repair the world.     Since Christ lived and preached in an oral culture, scholars expect that short, memorable stories or phrases are more likely to be historical and factual.

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Irony:   Based on several important narrative parables [such as the Parable of the Good Samaritan], scholars decided that irony, reversal, and frustration of expectations were characteristic of Christ’s style.   Does a pericope/concise passage illustrate opposites or impossibilities?   If it does, it’s more likely to be authentic.   For example, “love your enemies.”    
 
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Not just the Parables but the  beatitudes feature the dramatic presentation and reversal of expectations that are characteristic of Christ.  The poor are accepted as constituting the primary recipients of the Good News and, therefore, as having an inherent capacity of understanding it better than anyone else. That’s pretty threatening for any comfortable Christian. For not only do we have to help the poor, not only do we have to advocate on their behalf, we also have to see them as perhaps understanding God better than we do!  But that’s not a new idea:  It goes back to Jesus. The poor, the sick and the outcast “got” him better than the wealthy did.   Perhaps because there was less standing between the poor and God.   Less stuff [pride].   Maybe that’s why Jesus said in the Gospel of Matthew, “You will have treasure in heaven, and follow me.” Like I said, pretty disturbing, then and now. It’s hardly “the opposite of the Gospel,” as ousted Fox News pundit Glenn Beck said.

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On real time forgiveness, note the instance of the man who accidentally spills a bowl of  chicken soup on another man.   The other man is aghast, then lets out the amazing Grace of a punchline   –  “Well, at least I love the comforting sense of chicken soup!!”   Wow!!

 

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Jesus always embraced the reproached,
the outcasts, of society, knowing that
these imperfect ones had a closer affinity
with God, more so than the overproud
sentients full of contemptuous opinions and

scathing comments vs. others.
To Jesus, imperfection is beautiful, as we
grow in God’s Holiness. His Holiness, is
not outcome dependent for us on earth.

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An interior contemplative “soul” is valued a la Albert, Hope Kiko [& young Kepola Lee in my article on the greatest of leaders], and of course, a Jesus [or ascetic Buddha or Allah,  for that matter]  –

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my mythic hero Frankie Starlight [Alan Pentony] dares to reach for the stars

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TV1EYBnPMEY

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Alan Pentony [with Anne Parillaud]

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frankie_Starlight

Plot

Frank Bois writes a successful first novel and finds himself looking back over his life. His mother Bernadette (Parillaud) was a French woman who, after the death of her friends and family in World War II, hid herself aboard an Allied war ship heading to Ireland, where she exchanged sexual favors for silence among the soldiers who found her on board. A nice customs agent, Jack Kelly (Byrne), allowed Bernadette to enter Ireland illegally, and they soon became a couple lovers, even though she was already pregnant from one of the soldiers from the ship.

Bernadette soon gave birth to young Frankie (Pentony), who suffers from dwarfism. As he grew older, Frankie develops romantic feelings for Jack’s daughter Emma (Cates), who does not share his feelings, while Jack teaches astronomy to Frankie. Eventually, Bernadette meets Terry Klout (Dillon), an American soldier she had met on the war ship, who offers to marry her. Bernadette and Frankie go with Terry to his home in Texas, but both mother and son feel like they don’t belong there, so they return to the Irish home they loved. An older Bernadette eventually committed suicide, and Frank used his life as source material for his writing.

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Empathy means literally “to enter the pathos.”    

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To enter the pathos is to surrender to all that is tragic, absurd, lost, despairing, meaningless. The word “pathos” is not a derision; it’s an observation.

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Compassion means literally “to suffer with.”

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We bandy these words about too easily. It’s not all that frequently we find people who will really do what are implied in those words. I cherish the people I do find.

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I no longer lift bread and wine. I lift broken, poured out people.   Folks like myself.    My meaning in life is to help others find their meaning.

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http://www.lvrj.com/living/culture-s-approach-to-suffering-only-prolongs-pain-129608658.html

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http://www.lvrj.com/living/explanations-fail-to-explain-what-happened-in-newtown-184599551.html

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2012/12/20/when-it-all-ends-we-have-to-let-it-go-so-if-thats-true-why-wait-for-death-why-not-let-it-go-now-and-that-includes-injury-resentment-bitterness-grudges-injustice-and-just-plain-wrong-pla/

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When it all ends, we have to let it go. So, if that’s true, why wait for death? Why not let it go now? And that includes injury, resentment, bitterness, grudges, injustice, and just plain wrong place/wrong time bad luck. — sage Steven Kalas

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http://www.lvrj.com/living/37406449.html

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It seems to take a lifetime to let everything go

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The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” is a film about a man who is aging in reverse. He is born with the metabolism, skin, cataracts, arthritis and relative vitality of a man in his late 80s. His life ends some 90 years later as a newborn.

I’m not sure I liked this movie. Not sure how eagerly I’ll be recommending it. It’s long. Slow in spots. Fragmented — the subplots come and go, sometimes concurrently, but several of the roads don’t lead to Rome. Some of the roads just come to a dead stop, or peter out in the middle of nowhere.

In some ways the movie is a 160-minute slice-of-life travelogue, albeit beautifully shot, well-written and well-acted. The makeup and period set designs and wardrobe are by themselves worth the price of admission.

I need a referral to a college professor of literature. See, “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” is a recrafting of a 1921 F. Scott Fitzgerald short story by the same name. And it’s quite possible I just didn’t get it. Me, a guy who really loves to be beguiled and provoked by evocative metaphors in art and literature; well, this one might well have been beyond me.

Is it about death? Mortality? Ageism? Fate? Or possibly that there’s no such thing as fate? Perhaps the story ultimately forces us to face chaos. Perhaps it says that every day is but a toss of the existential dice. All the more reason, of course, to pay attention and give thanks for inexplicable moments of love, courage, beauty, character, truth and joy.

Perhaps the movie is saying that our existential crisis isn’t about growing old. That the crisis would be identical if we were born old and were growing younger. Is that it? Do I get it?

In one scene, a gifted ballet dancer is struck by a car, leg shattered, surviving, but never to dance again. The narration goes to great pains to observe the scores of incidental, random absurdities that fall into place to make this accident happen … as opposed to nearly happening, which is to say not happening at all.

I don’t think I believe in fate. Yet, I am convinced there are moments rightly called destiny. I’m no longer even bothered by the contradiction.  [“fate” relates to events of the future and present of an individual and in cases in literature unalterable, whereas “destiny” relates to the probable future. Fate implies no choice, but with destiny the entity participates in achieving an outcome that is directly related to itself  –http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Destiny#Fate    ]

But one subplot was, for me, worth every door that slammed shut in my coronary arteries under the onslaught of nearly three hours of movie theater popcorn butter.

The protagonist Benjamin meets his birth father. The father admits to being horrified by his son’s “old man” appearance at birth. The father explains how he abandoned Benjamin to a benevolent caretaker of a home for the elderly. The father expresses remorse, regret and a wish to reconcile. And Benjamin is rightly offended and angry.

But then we see Benjamin caring for his father, who is now terminally ill. Benjamin walks his father to the grave in love, mercy and compassion, while we listen to his retrospective narrative explain why. He tells us that we can cry, scream, beat our fists, rail against the fates and circumstance and coincidence, wish our lot in life had been different, spend sleepless nights wondering why we didn’t turn left instead of right … “but when it all ends, we have to let it go.”

When it all ends, we have to let it go.

It is often said of death that “you can’t take it with you.” We mean, of course, that material wealth is rendered irrelevant in death. We don’t take bank accounts or MVP trophies or advanced academic degrees or Lexi (that’s the plural of Lexus) or even so much as your seventh-grade perfect attendance certificate with you to the other side of the grave. It is all for nought.

But “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” made me push this pithy colloquialism to a new frontier. It is not only material wealth and earthly accomplishment torn from our grasp by death. It is, well, everything. And that includes injury, resentment, bitterness, grudges, injustice, and just plain wrong place/wrong time bad luck.

When it all ends, we have to let it go.

So, if that’s true, why wait for death? Why not let it go now?

I tell you, the devil is gonna be ticked off.

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Deepest selfhood in the end is walked alone, per Scripture [for a believer in this eternal myth]   —

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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/emily-timbol/dont-believe-the-lies-god-doesnt-have-a-perfect-match-for-you_b_2238475.html?utm_hp_ref=religion

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Don’t Believe the Lies, God Doesn’t Have a Perfect Match for You

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“Find God’s match for you.”

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What a load of crap.

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I love my husband, but he’s not God’s match for me. Such a thing doesn’t exist. God is not an omnipotent Yenta, spending His days deciding which coupling would lead to the easiest, happiest, most attractive (white, based on the ads) twosome. He certainly isn’t sending down Christian biased algorithms to profit driven websites, so they can do the work for Him.

Why?

Because soul mates is something we made up. Not God. Nowhere in the Bible does God, Jesus or the apostles give any hint that there is one perfect mate out there that we should be searching for. Quite the opposite. In 1 Corinthians 7, verses 27-28, Paul famously said,

“…I think that it is good for a man to remain as he is. Are you pledged to a woman? Do not seek to be released. Are you free from such a commitment? Do not look for a wife. But if you do marry, you have not sinned; and if a virgin marries, she has not sinned. But those who marry will face many troubles in this life, and I want to spare you this.”

That’s hardly a glowing recommendation for soul mates.

 

But marriage is significant in the Bible. The metaphor for Christ’s relationship to the church itself is symbolized by a wedding. We, the church, are Christ’s bride. There’s even a book of salacious love poetry written about a couple on their wedding night (Song of Solomon) that some theologians believe is meant to describe God’s love for us. Most humans are born with the desire for relationship, companionship and sex. So what’s so wrong with wanting to find a mate that shares the same beliefs as you?

Nothing.

But that’s not what these websites are advertising. They’re not saying, “here’s a site where you can try to find another Christian who may or may not be compatible with you.” The lie that they’re propagating, is that if you do the “right” things, go to the “right” websites, and believe the “right” verses, God will bring you your match. The verse displayed at the top of one site’s homepage, from Psalms, says, “Delight yourself in the Lord, and he will give you the desires of your heart.” That message essentially says two things; 1) If you’re still single, and don’t wish to be, you must not be delighting yourself in the Lord enough, and 2) This website can grant you those desires.

That is a lie.

Not just because a Christian dating website, by design, sets you up to select a mate based on things that are less than spiritual. Let’s be real, just as much time is spent lusting over profile pictures on a Christian site, as a secular one.

Those desires of your heart are not going to be fulfilled by a website, because it’s likely your desires are flawed. To quote the wise and wonderful Tim Keller,

“They [some singles] do not see marriage as two flawed people coming together to create a space of stability, love and consolation … Rather, they are looking for someone who will accept them as they are, complement their abilities and fulfill their sexual and emotional desires … A marriage based not on self-denial but on self-fulfillment will require a low- or no-maintenance partner who meets your needs while making almost no claims on you. Simply put — today people are asking far too much in the marriage partner.”

Keller is right. There is no perfect mate for you. Because no one is perfect — we’re all flawed. Whomever you marry will not be your match. “Match” implies two puzzle pieces interlocking perfectly and resting for eternity. That is not marriage. No two people will ever “fit” perfectly. Marriage isn’t about finding this mythical relationship. It’s about finding someone you’re willing to commit to for a lifetime of work, sacrifice and the active (not feeling) love that marriage requires.

 

That’s what makes me so angry about these websites ads. They set people up for an expectation of finding and marrying a perfect soul mate. One who, once they prove themselves imperfect, might make their spouse feel they made a mistake. A mistake that could easily lead to divorce, and the beginning of another search for the “right” one.

It makes sense why Paul would want to spare us from this heartache.

If you’re single, and you haven’t found a husband or wife yet, it could be because you’re not delighting yourself in the Lord. Or it could be that God knows you’re not ready yet. Or, it could be that you don’t need someone else, and the best way for you to serve God is by yourself. As scary as that sounds, if that’s what’s best for you, forcing yourself into a marriage would not make you happy.

There’s nothing wrong with actively trying to find a mate, online or not. Just know that once you do, there’s just as many troubles as joys ahead. My advice? Skip the websites trying to manipulate your emotions. Spend your time finding ways to fulfill the person that God already fully loves and desires, just as they are. You.

 

 
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Live Life Backward in 2013, Yes!   The New Year’s Resolution:   Inspired by something/someone,  mission on, baby!!

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Live inspired each day.

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As Erwin McManus writes, “There are few things more powerful than a life lived with passionate clarity.”

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In praise of subtle sensual Maureen Kilgore & ole’ country boy Eddy Arnold!!

 
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137 Responses to I will die a good death — as my greatest hero Viktor Frankl said, “having been” is the surest kind of being, though it cannot inspire envy [life is full of suffering].

  1. Pingback: theodicy — suffering in the world and the matter of evil — an afterlife is a cop-out | Curtis Narimatsu

  2. Pingback: Writing and eventually dying a good death — expressing & sharing love to the end | Curtis Narimatsu

  3. Pingback: sage Rev. James Martin: Liberation theology has also animated some of the great Christian witnesses of our time. Several of my brother Jesuits (and their companions), some of whom wrote and taught liberation theology, were assassinated at the University o

  4. Pingback: sage Rev. James Martin: Liberation theology has also animated some of the great Christian witnesses of our time. Several of my brother Jesuits (and their companions), some of whom wrote and taught liberation theology, were assassinated at the University o

  5. Pingback: sage Rev. James Martin: Liberation theology has also animated some of the great Christian witnesses of our time. Several of my brother Jesuits (and their companions), some of whom wrote and taught liberation theology, were assassinated at the University o

  6. Pingback: sage Rev. James Martin: Liberation theology has also animated some of the great Christian witnesses of our time. Several of my brother Jesuits (and their companions), some of whom wrote and taught liberation theology, were assassinated at the University o

  7. Pingback: sage Rev. James Martin: Liberation theology has also animated some of the great Christian witnesses of our time. Several of my brother Jesuits (and their companions), some of whom wrote and taught liberation theology, were assassinated at the University o

  8. Pingback: sage Rev. James Martin: Liberation theology has also animated some of the great Christian witnesses of our time. Several of my brother Jesuits (and their companions), some of whom wrote and taught liberation theology, were assassinated at the University o

  9. Pingback: sage Rev. James Martin: Liberation theology has also animated some of the great Christian witnesses of our time. Several of my brother Jesuits (and their companions), some of whom wrote and taught liberation theology, were assassinated at the University o

  10. Pingback: sage Rev. James Martin: Liberation theology has also animated some of the great Christian witnesses of our time. Several of my brother Jesuits (and their companions), some of whom wrote and taught liberation theology, were assassinated at the University o

  11. Pingback: dealing with being rejected/forsaken — the upside/redemptive way to deal with not being chosen | Curtis Narimatsu

  12. Pingback: If we’re going to write, it is because we have a desire to express ourselves, even if we don’t quite understand what we wish to say. It might just be an inner yearning, but by making the choice to engage in the process rather than the result, our work

  13. Pingback: If we’re going to write, it is because we have a desire to express ourselves, even if we don’t quite understand what we wish to say. It might just be an inner yearning, but by making the choice to engage in the process rather than the result, our work

  14. Pingback: If we’re going to write, it is because we have a desire to express ourselves, even if we don’t quite understand what we wish to say. It might just be an inner yearning, but by making the choice to engage in the process rather than the result, our work

  15. Pingback: If we’re going to write, it is because we have a desire to express ourselves, even if we don’t quite understand what we wish to say. It might just be an inner yearning, but by making the choice to engage in the process rather than the result, our work

  16. Pingback: If we’re going to write, it is because we have a desire to express ourselves, even if we don’t quite understand what we wish to say. It might just be an inner yearning, but by making the choice to engage in the process rather than the result, our work

  17. Pingback: If we’re going to write, it is because we have a desire to express ourselves, even if we don’t quite understand what we wish to say. It might just be an inner yearning, but by making the choice to engage in the process rather than the result, our work

  18. Pingback: If we’re going to write, it is because we have a desire to express ourselves, even if we don’t quite understand what we wish to say. It might just be an inner yearning, but by making the choice to engage in the process rather than the result, our work

  19. Pingback: If we’re going to write, it is because we have a desire to express ourselves, even if we don’t quite understand what we wish to say. It might just be an inner yearning, but by making the choice to engage in the process rather than the result, our work

  20. Pingback: If we’re going to write, it is because we have a desire to express ourselves, even if we don’t quite understand what we wish to say. It might just be an inner yearning, but by making the choice to engage in the process rather than the result, our work

  21. Pingback: If we’re going to write, it is because we have a desire to express ourselves, even if we don’t quite understand what we wish to say. It might just be an inner yearning, but by making the choice to engage in the process rather than the result, our work

  22. Pingback: Thriving, learning, & having wisdom are about getting up each morning with intention, clarity, & commitment to seek & nurture connection along life’s healthy, healing path of inner nourishment & peace of mind | Curtis Narimatsu

  23. Pingback: In praise of Kathie Melocco and her ontic, the master Viktor Frankl: Have you reached a turning point in your life? | Curtis Narimatsu

  24. Pingback: Ante Cuvalo: Stipo Sosic– The Road to Hell and Back — Viktor Frankl’s analog | Curtis Narimatsu

  25. Pingback: Finding meaning in suffering a la great master Viktor Frankl | Curtis Narimatsu

  26. Pingback: great sage Rev. James Martin on liberation theology | Curtis Narimatsu

  27. Pingback: my Biblical hero Matthew — the lowest of the low | Curtis Narimatsu

  28. Pingback: Sage Jason Velotta: For the people of Jericho, Zacchaeus was the lowest of the low. He was an outcast, the scum of the earth. No one is too wretched, too broken, or too guilty of sin. In fact, no matter what you have done, we are all in the same boat. We

  29. Pingback: Sage Paul Naumann: Jesus said, “If anyone desires to be first, he shall be last of all and servant of all.” — Mark 9:35. | Curtis Narimatsu

  30. Pingback: Sage Marci Glass: Jesus doesn’t seem to care WHY he’s in this situation. But Jesus does seem to care enough about this man, this foreign, tomb-dwelling, demon possessed man to heal him. | Curtis Narimatsu

  31. Pingback: Sage Tom Stein: Three levels of compassion in Jesus — 1) Jesus has compassion for the man’s condition. While others will reject him and run from him, Jesus heals him. 2) Jesus has compassion for the man’s isolation. How long ago did someone last

  32. Pingback: Sage Larry Brincefield: The Widow of Nain — Jesus’ primary concern was for this poor woman… and Jesus raised her son from the dead… and then, instead of saying “come and follow Me”…He told him to go and care for his dear moth

  33. Pingback: Sage Becky Blanton: The difference between true compassion and a snow job is obvious to anyone who has experienced both! The whole point of the parable of the Good Samaritan is that compassion is about one person’s decision to act based on who they were

  34. Pingback: Sage Mike Bagwell: Yet Jesus’ apostles “turned the world upside down” … for Jesus! These are the exact words of Luke the historian in Acts 17:6. | Curtis Narimatsu

  35. Pingback: Sage Dave Trenholm: Jesus ate meals with Rome’s tax collectors and other disreputable sinners – the lowest of the low – because by simply eating with those people, He was letting them know that they were important to him. If you ate with anyone

  36. Pingback: Sage Fred R. Anderson: How could the lawful Pharisees not praise God for that? But still, they must keep their eye on Jesus, for his ways are not their own ways, nor those of John the Baptist and his disciples for that matter. Look at those with whom Jesu

  37. Pingback: Margaret M. Mitchell: To describe modern Christians on the basis of their proclamations??? | Curtis Narimatsu

  38. Pingback: Unforgiveness is a major cause of depression, many people have unforgiveness but are not even aware of it because it is buried so deep inside. — Seek God Ministries | Curtis Narimatsu

  39. Pingback: Jesus continually sought out marginalised people to befriend. An immense compassion drew him toward poor people, those with leprosy (who were regarded as outcasts) and tax collectors (who were loathed as traitors). Jesus had friends who would feel at home

  40. Pingback: Jesus’ invitation was for “the poor, the crippled, the lame, the blind” to share in the Kingdom of God, a feast of equals, of open commensality, where there is no distinctions at the table. Jesus broke down barriers by lifting up those s

  41. Pingback: Richard J. Henderson: Once a journalist who had come to report about her mission, looked at her huddled over the body of a dying, destitute man. He said, “You couldn’t pay me to do that kind of work!” Hearing him, Mother Teresa turned an

  42. Pingback: Time and again His parables sought to justify His association with outcasts (Lk. 14:15-24; 15:1-32; Mt. 18:23-25; 20:1-15; 21:28-32). — Carelinks Ministries | Curtis Narimatsu

  43. Pingback: Richard J. Henderson: Once a journalist who had come to report about her mission, looked at her huddled over the body of a dying, destitute man. He said, “You couldn’t pay me to do that kind of work!” Hearing him, Mother Teresa turned an

  44. Pingback: Sage Edward F. Markquart: In Jesus’ parables, the accent is always on the last figure, on the last personality of the story. That is where the focus is. For example, in my opening stories, the focus is on the third stringers who had a change of heart an

  45. Pingback: Jesus’ life was full of paradoxes: the shepherds who first came to him were the lowest of the low, wandering around in fetid clothes, while the magi were some of the highest in their society. Baby Jesus was surrounded by the pungent smell of animal excr

  46. Pingback: Jesus’ invitation was for “the poor, the crippled, the lame, the blind” to share in the Kingdom of God, a feast of equals, of open commensality, where there is no distinction at the table. Jesus broke down barriers by lifting up those sh

  47. Pingback: Sage Marci Glass: Jesus doesn’t seem to care WHY the other man is in this situation. But Jesus does seem to care enough about this man, this foreign, tomb-dwelling, demon possessed man to heal him. | Curtis Narimatsu

  48. Pingback: David Wilson: If you’ve not been beat up, downcast and broken at some point in your life, stop reading now. For the unscarred and unscathed, I have nothing further to share. I am thankful you have ventured here and wish you continued smooth sailing.

  49. Pingback: The kicker, the twist in this story, is the guest list and the etiquette. Jesus says, Don’t make the rich people, the healthy people, the prominent and powerful first. Nope, invite the poorest, the sick, the cripples, the lowest of the low. They’re th

  50. Pingback: The kicker, the twist in this story, is the guest list and the etiquette. Jesus says, Don’t make the rich people, the healthy people, the prominent and powerful first. Nope, invite the poorest, the sick, the cripples, the lowest of the low. They’re th

  51. Pingback: In the case of Christ we have a unique form of persuasion. It is like what happens when an error in our viewpoint is shown to us, and our mind reassembles around the truth that we have not seen. But it is unlike this process in that the truth that takes u

  52. Pingback: In the case of Christ we have a unique form of persuasion. It is like what happens when an error in our viewpoint is shown to us, and our mind reassembles around the truth that we have not seen. But it is unlike this process in that the truth that takes u

  53. Pingback: Jesus violated every conceivable tradition when it came to His associations with the marginalized of Jewish society. He infuriated the Pharisees with every compassionate touch. The Qumran community of the Essenes had an unconditional law: “No madman, or

  54. Pingback: This is why when the almighty God came into the world in Jesus, he came as the lowest of the low, as weakness itself, as a complete and utter nothing. — Robert L. Short | Curtis Narimatsu

  55. Pingback: The beautiful word minister, or Huperetes in Greek, has a very special meaning. It is the name of a very low slave, the lowest of the low. This slave was either shanghaied from his home or from the streets or taken from prison or simply kidnapped and was

  56. Pingback: What did Jesus see? — Judy of Rapture Ready | Curtis Narimatsu

  57. Pingback: They heard him preach about how the smallest, lowest, and least among them, were precious in God’s eyes, and the greatest in the Kingdom of God. — Malina & Altenburg | Curtis Narimatsu

  58. Pingback: We typically refuse to help those who are the source of suffering, disappointment, injustice, humiliation, or disgust. — David Chadwell | Curtis Narimatsu

  59. Pingback: But compassion seems to drive religious people’s charitable feelings LESS than other groups — the more religious ground their generosity less in emotion, and more in doctrine, communal identity, or reputational concerns. | Curtis Narimatsu

  60. Pingback: The Pharisees’ statement is intended as a stinging rebuke. It’s not really a question, it’s kind of a rhetorical question, intended to be vindictive and bitter. It’s outrage, why do you eat and drink with the tax gatherers and sinn

  61. Pingback: After all, where was Jesus found most of the time? For me, I see Jesus living and interacting with beggars, prostitutes and tax collectors the lowest of the low in His society. And by choice and association Jesus himself was one of the marginalized, and I

  62. Pingback: God who is so high above the nations, reigning from heaven, still looks down upon the earth to the poorest of the poor, the lowliest of the low…God cares for these folks that are often overlooked. When the Psalmist asks us, “Who is like the Lord our G

  63. Pingback: God who is so high above the nations, reigning from heaven, still looks down upon the earth to the poorest of the poor, the lowliest of the low…God cares for these folks that are often overlooked. When the Psalmist asks us, “Who is like the Lord our G

  64. Pingback: After all, where was Jesus found most of the time? For me, I see Jesus living and interacting with beggars, prostitutes and tax collectors — the lowest of the low in His society. And by choice and association Jesus himself was one of the marginalize

  65. Pingback: They heard him preach about how the smallest, lowest, and least among them — were precious in God’s eyes, and the greatest in the Kingdom of God. — Malina & Altenburg | Curtis Narimatsu

  66. Pingback: God who is so high above the nations, reigning from heaven, still looks down upon the earth to the poorest of the poor, the lowliest of the low…God cares for these folks that are often overlooked. When the Psalmist asks us, “Who is like the Lord our G

  67. Pingback: God who is so high above the nations, reigning from heaven, still looks down upon the earth to the poorest of the poor, the lowliest of the low…God cares for these folks that are often overlooked. When the Psalmist asks us, “Who is like the Lord our G

  68. Pingback: Jesus answered and said to him, “What I do you do not realize now but you shall understand hereafter.” You don’t get it, Peter, you don’t get My humiliation. You think this is too lowly for Me, you think this is too humble for Me,

  69. Pingback: How often do we judge others? I’ll be the first to say that it’s definitely more than it should be. Without even realizing, we judge instantly based on appearance. In the back of our minds, we convince ourselves we are better because we don

  70. Pingback: If you were in the bottom of a hole.. who would you most resent helping you out of the hole? Just think about it….. ‘Cause that’s whom Jesus calls you to love. — April Coates | Curtis Narimatsu

  71. Pingback: Healing the sick. Loving the unloved. Welcoming the unwelcomed. Gathering the little ones. Receiving the rejected and abandoned. Comforting the elders. The Paschal Mystery (Passover) is the greatest act of compassion. God, suffering with us, putting every

  72. Pingback: Many of us claim to love humanity even – the lowest of the low like lepers, prostitutes, and tax-collectors. (Now you know why income tax returns are due at Easter). In affirming the lowest of the low Jesus affirmed humanity. In His emphasis upon th

  73. Pingback: Many of us claim to love humanity even – the lowest of the low like lepers, prostitutes, and tax-collectors. (Now you know why income tax returns are due at Easter). In affirming the lowest of the low Jesus affirmed humanity. In His emphasis upon th

  74. Pingback: Many of us claim to love humanity even – the lowest of the low like lepers, prostitutes, and tax-collectors. (Now you know why income tax returns are due at Easter). In affirming the lowest of the low Jesus affirmed humanity. In His emphasis upon th

  75. Pingback: Here’s the power of hospitality—this willingness to go out of our way to invite and welcome and include those who formerly felt themselves to be on the outside looking in, creating holy space where those who formerly felt themselves to be alienated an

  76. Pingback: But is that the way Jesus treated tax collectors and other outsiders? Matthew 11, verse 19 refers to Jesus as “a friend of tax collectors and sinners”. Time and again in the gospels we witness Jesus befriending those whom others have cast asid

  77. Pingback: But is that the way Jesus treated tax collectors and other outsiders? Matthew 11, verse 19 refers to Jesus as “a friend of tax collectors and sinners”. Time and again in the gospels we witness Jesus befriending those whom others have cast asid

  78. Pingback: Jesus stood in the face of all social convention, and loudly proclaimed that those that see the spirituality of service, and sacrifice, are closer to the kingdom of God, than those with correct doctrine, correct church, and correct lineage. Jesus, this ra

  79. Pingback: Do you know Him? | Curtis Narimatsu

  80. Pingback: Jesus stood in the face of all social convention, and loudly proclaimed that those that see the spirituality of service, and sacrifice, are closer to the kingdom of God, than those with correct doctrine, correct church, and correct lineage. Jesus, this ra

  81. Pingback: But is that the way Jesus treated tax collectors and other outsiders? Matthew 11, verse 19 refers to Jesus as “a friend of tax collectors and sinners”. Time and again in the gospels we witness Jesus befriending those whom others have cast asid

  82. Pingback: How often do we judge others? I’ll be the first to say that it’s definitely more than it should be. Without even realizing, we judge instantly based on appearance. In the back of our minds, we convince ourselves we are better because we don

  83. Pingback: In praise of Lester Chun: Intentionality & the Holy Spirit within oneself | Curtis Narimatsu

  84. Pingback: The Christian distinction which separates Christianity from earlier religions: Matthew 5:44 — Love your enemies, bless those who curse you, do good to those who hate you, and pray for those who mistreat you and persecute you. | Curtis Narimatsu

  85. Pingback: What is not in your power to do — to change your enemy — thence, help heal your pain by letting go of your vengeance | Curtis Narimatsu

  86. Pingback: Of a Natalia Stavas — Bombs, Instincts and Morals: Why Heroes Risk It All for Strangers — Jeffrey Kluger | Curtis Narimatsu

  87. Pingback: “To be yourself in a world that is constantly trying to make you something else is the greatest accomplishment.” — Ralph Waldo Emerson — Embracing Authenticity — by Randy Hain | Curtis Narimatsu

  88. Pingback: My Saint — Oscar Romero — and a flourishing of the Social Gospel, with credit to current Pope Francis | Curtis Narimatsu

  89. Pingback: Karyl McBride: Why Am I So Afraid of Being Alone? It may even clear your thoughts about what is healthy for you. “Sometimes it takes darkness and the sweet confinement of your aloneness to learn that anything or anyone that does not bring you alive

  90. Pingback: Karyl McBride: Why Am I So Afraid of Being Alone? It may even clear your thoughts about what is healthy for you. “Sometimes it takes darkness and the sweet confinement of your aloneness to learn that anything or anyone that does not bring you alive

  91. Pingback: Karyl McBride: Why Am I So Afraid of Being Alone? It may even clear your thoughts about what is healthy for you. “Sometimes it takes darkness and the sweet confinement of your aloneness to learn that anything or anyone that does not bring you alive

  92. Pingback: Living well[spring] | Curtis Narimatsu

  93. Pingback: How to deal with loneliness: To stop feeling lonely, we first must accept that we are feeling lonely. Sometimes admitting that to ourselves is difficult. We then have to express those feelings of loneliness in some way. We might find ourselves writing in

  94. Pingback: As the recent history of American Protestantism proves, when faith becomes the servant of partisan politics, even a great religious tradition can lose its soul. So, where have all the Protestants gone? They are swelling the ranks of America’s fastes

  95. Pingback: “This is Water” – David Foster Wallace — Wallace used many forms of irony, but focused on individuals’ continued longing for earnest, unselfconscious experience and communication in a media-saturated society. Wallace helped u

  96. Pingback: What’s the lesson in your narrative? — Kare Anderson | Curtis Narimatsu

  97. Pingback: A practicing Catholic, Stephen Colbert asked record-breaking author Dan Brown, “Did you write this to familiarize yourself with where you’ll be when you die?” | Curtis Narimatsu

  98. Pingback: “Ultimately I was fascinated by Gatsby as a character. I was moved by him. It no longer became a love story to me. It became a tragedy of this new American, this man in a new world where everything is possible, and at a time of great opulence in the

  99. Pingback: Ask yourself the ultimate questions in your life. Who am I? What is my purpose? What is important to me? How do I live an authentic life? By asking the ultimate questions in your life, you begin the lifelong journey inward, a journey of reflection, contem

  100. Pingback: am not concerned if you believe in the resurrection. But I challenge you to practice resurrection. What within you aches to be reborn?Who around you desperately needs renewed hope, a new word of encouragement, a new perspective, a new lease on life?Or as

  101. Pingback: Ask yourself the ultimate questions in your life. Who am I? What is my purpose? What is important to me? How do I live an authentic life? By asking the ultimate questions in your life, you begin the lifelong journey inward, a journey of reflection, contem

  102. Pingback: Ask yourself the ultimate questions in your life. Who am I? What is my purpose? What is important to me? How do I live an authentic life? By asking the ultimate questions in your life, you begin the lifelong journey inward, a journey of reflection, contem

  103. Pingback: Jesus’ death becomes even more powerful when this particular messiah also carries your personal projections. That is, the celebrity’s life mirrors important pieces of your own psychic journey. Your own life dramas. Jesus did this for me with h

  104. Pingback: Jesus’ death becomes even more powerful when this particular messiah also carries your personal projections. That is, the celebrity’s life mirrors important pieces of your own psychic journey. Your own life dramas. Jesus did this for me with h

  105. Pingback: Jesus’ death becomes even more powerful when this particular messiah also carries your personal projections. That is, the celebrity’s life mirrors important pieces of your own psychic journey. Your own life dramas. Jesus did this for me with h

  106. Pingback: Like most writers, I use bits and pieces from my life in my writing. I start with character because that’s the crucial part. I base my characters on bits and pieces of people I either knew or know now. I do that, realizing we’re all capable of

  107. Pingback: I draw water from the well of my life’s work, and create stories. — Mark Rubinstein | Curtis Narimatsu

  108. Pingback: We all have the power to pick our attitudes | Curtis Narimatsu

  109. Pingback: Then Jesus cleansed the temple of everything evil about us — then in typical mob hysteria, we “cleansed” ourselves of Jesus via His Crucifixion | Curtis Narimatsu

  110. Pingback: In praise of nickname Stoner’s bridging the proverbial age gap — from Stoner age 43 to Peter age 66: “You are not an uptight jerk” (like other ultra-judgmental old farts!!) | Curtis Narimatsu

  111. Pingback: In praise of nickname Stoner’s bridging the proverbial generation gap — from Stoner age 43 to Peter age 66: “You are not an uptight jerk” (like other ultra-judgmental old farts!!) | Curtis Narimatsu

  112. Pingback: Ambivalence: The hair-thin line between being thrilled (Jesus our savior comes to our town Jerusalem) and being threatened (our own ambivalence — Jesus cleanses the temple of everything evil about ourselves — we feel threatened by Jesus reveal

  113. Pingback: Ambivalence: The hair-thin line between being thrilled (Jesus our savior comes to our town Jerusalem) and being threatened (our own ambivalence — Jesus cleanses the temple of everything evil about ourselves — we feel threatened by Jesus reveal

  114. Pingback: Love-hate dynamic of mob hysteria in praising, then killing Jesus — all within a week’s time | Curtis Narimatsu

  115. Pingback: So Jesus exposed our unlovely selves (Jesus’ cleansing of the temple by ridding it of our money-changers) — we didn’t have to kill Jesus — we could have sublimated our primal fears about our hypocritical nature — and instead

  116. Pingback: We depraved humans are so fickle, to say the least — my recount of Jesus’ exposure of our mob hysteria 2,000 yrs. ago — nothing has changed in us since then — we still are a mob in senseless hysteria | Curtis Narimatsu

  117. Pingback: Aquinas is equidistant to early church father Augustine 400 yrs. before Aquinas — and to us 400 yrs. after 1200 AD Aquinas — yet, nothing has changed in us — we still are as depraved today as we were when we crucified Jesus in our sensel

  118. Pingback: Aquinas is equidistant to early church father Augustine 800 yrs. before Aquinas — and to us 800 yrs. after 1200 AD Aquinas — yet, nothing has changed in us — we still are as depraved today as we were when we crucified Jesus in our sensel

  119. Pingback: Aquinas is equidistant to early church father Augustine 800 yrs. before Aquinas — and to us 800 yrs. after 1200 AD Aquinas — yet, nothing has changed in us — we still are as depraved today as we were when we crucified Jesus in our sensel

  120. Pingback: Nothing has changed in us — we still are as depraved today as we were when we crucified Jesus in our senseless mob hysteria — Aquinas is equidistant to early church father Augustine 800 yrs. before Aquinas — and to us 800 yrs. after 1200

  121. Pingback: We depraved humans of immense despair — nothing has changed in us — we still are as depraved today as we were when we crucified Jesus in our senseless mob hysteria — Aquinas is equidistant to early church father Augustine 800 yrs. before

  122. Pingback: We depraved humans of immense despair — nothing has changed in us — we still are as depraved today as we were when we crucified Jesus in our senseless mob hysteria — Aquinas is equidistant to early church father Augustine 800 yrs. before

  123. Pingback: We are depraved humans steeped in immense despair — nothing has changed in us — we still are as depraved today as we were when we crucified Jesus in our senseless mob hysteria — Aquinas is equidistant to early church father Augustine 800

  124. Pingback: We are depraved humans steeped in immense despair — nothing has changed in us — we still are as depraved today as we were when we crucified Jesus in our senseless mob hysteria — Aquinas is equidistant to early church father Augustine 800

  125. Pingback: Jesus’ mind-blowing reversal/frustration of all expectations — turning common-sense ideas upside down, confounding us all — spark our deepest imaginative opposites/impossibilities, to say the least!! | Curtis Narimatsu

  126. Pingback: Jesus’ mind-blowing “huli ‘au” (upside down) overturning of this world of our flesh — Jesus violated every conceivable tradition when it came to His associations with the marginalized of Jewish society. He infuriated the Phar

  127. Pingback: Mind-blowing Jesus stands inexplicably before us, and Jesus turns common-sense ideas upside down/”huli ‘au,” confounding us all! Dedicated to authentic Ri-in!! | Curtis Narimatsu

  128. Pingback: Life is full of reversals of expectations, baby!! Dedicated to my little girl Staycie age 40 — my separation anxiety from my baby girl when she turned 18 & left home to live on her own turned out to be her greatest crossover to independence R

  129. Pingback: Hawaii’s greatest modern wayfinder Rev. Hung Wai Ching (1905-2002) alter ego Rev. Reinhold Niebuhr (1892-1971) — Niebuhr’s immensely popular Serenity Prayer: “Taking, as Jesus did, this sinful world as it is, not as I would have it

  130. Pingback: Calvinism, we keep being reminded, was the faith of the Puritans who settled most early American colonies, and its teachings are reflected in founding documents. Since the U.S. Constitution is so preoccupied with checks and balances, some old-timers found

  131. Pingback: Calvinism, we keep being reminded, was the faith of the Puritans who settled most early American colonies, and its teachings are reflected in founding documents. Since the U.S. Constitution is so preoccupied with checks and balances, some old-timers found

  132. Pingback: To love and be loved are what life is all about | Curtis Narimatsu

  133. Pingback: I’m here to love and be loved | Curtis Narimatsu

  134. Pingback: Nobody comes to therapy who hasn’t lost something. The heart is injured. Limping. Constrained by psychic adhesions. Aching, either obviously or just behind the curtain of consciousness. The therapeutic relationship is the MRI. It reveals what’s torn.

  135. Pingback: Nobody comes to therapy who hasn’t lost something. The heart is injured. Limping. Constrained by psychic adhesions. Aching, either obviously or just behind the curtain of consciousness. The therapeutic relationship is the MRI. It reveals what’s torn.

  136. Pingback: To love and to be loved are mystical desires a la Carl Jung’s archetypes (Jung’s forebearers were mystics Plato, Apostle Paul, & Augustine) | Curtis Narimatsu

  137. Pingback: The young man with terminal cancer was going to die quicker than he thought, and he was very depressed about this. And of course he hadn’t gotten to make his mark, and he had this conversation with this young woman. And the young woman said, “No,

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