Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Prophetic Engine — sage Joan D. Hedrick

Harriet Beecher Stowe images

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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/joan-d-hedrick/harriet-beecher-stowes-prophetic-engine_b_2481986.html

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See ‘The Abolitionists’  on PBS featuring the intertwined stories of Frederick Douglass, William Lloyd Garrison, Angelina Grimké, Harriet Beecher Stowe and John Brown.

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Harriet Beecher Stowe famously said that she did not write “Uncle Tom’s Cabin,” God did.  Stowe’s blockbuster anti-slavery novel had its origin in what she described as “almost a tangible vision.” 

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Although a nationally recognized writer, up until this point Stowe had been for the most part a passive spectator to the anti-slavery agitation that had been roiling the United States. But as she wrote to her editor, the nation was in such peril that “even a woman or a child who can speak a word for freedom and humanity is bound to speak.”  

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Soon after the passage of the Fugitive Slave Law, which required all citizens, on pain of fine and imprisonment, to assist in the return of fugitives, Stowe was in church when, during the communion service, instead of seeing Christ on the cross, she saw an image of a slave being whipped.

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Overcome with convulsive sobs, she hurried home and committed to paper this scene, which would become the climactic chapter in Uncle Tom’s Cabin in which Simon Legree, enraged at Tom for refusing to reveal the whereabouts of two escaped slaves, has him whipped and left to die.
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Stowe’s ability to see Christ in the face of the oppressed slave was central to  the prophetic power she mobilized in Uncle Tom’s Cabin.

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Just as important was the powerful emotional response she had experienced, one she aimed to evoke in her readers.

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The story is told of a contemporary traveler on a train who hears in the compartment next to him the distraught sounds of crying and moaning.  He calls out, “Hello, are you in distress, or are you reading ‘Uncle Tom’s Cabin’?” 

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Stowe’s access to this emotional expressiveness was fostered not by the Calvinism of her youth, but by the “holiness” movement of the 1840s and ’50s.

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Radically egalitarian, it emphasized subjective experience and personal testimony.  Meeting in small groups in people’s homes, the holiness movement particularly empowered women to speak.

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The fact that Christian ministers maintained a timid silence in face of the Fugitive Slave Law both infuriated Stowe and propelled her to speak out. 

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Describing in “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” the everyday operations of the slave trade, she wryly remarks, “The trader had arrived at that stage of Christian and political perfection which has been recommended by some preachers and politicians in the north, lately, in which he had completely overcome every humane weakness and prejudice.”  

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Appealing to a higher law than the state, Stowe urged civil disobedience to what she considered a patently unchristian law.

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She employed a similar set of priorities when she challenged President Lincoln, who wrote during the Civil War, “My paramount object in this struggle is to save the Union, and is not either to save or destroy Slavery.  If I could save the Union without freeing any slave, I would do it.” 

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Stowe rewrote Lincoln’s words to reflect the priorities of “the King of kings”:

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My paramount object in this struggle is to set at liberty them that are bruised, and not to save or destroy the Union.  What I do in favor of the Union I do because it helps to free the oppressed.”  

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Stowe’s hero Tom embodies the victory of personal sanctification and martyrdom over the demands of the state, as Christ did in Roman times.

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Stowe was also propelled by a domestic event that was as common as it was profound in 19th-century family life.  The year before the Fugitive Slave Law, the Stowes’ sixth child, Samuel Charles, died in a cholera epidemic. Stowe later wrote that the death of Charley made her understand what the slave mother felt when her child was taken away at the auction block. There were circumstances of such bitterness and cruelty about the manner of his death, Stowe wrote, that she did not feel she could be consoled “unless this crushing of my own heart might enable me to work out some great good to others.”

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Stowe was responding to an injunction from the Calvinism in which she had been raised: If God sent his children pain and death, it was their Christian duty to submit to his chastening rod and to learn from the experience — in the language of the time, to “improve the affliction.” 

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By insistently looking at the way the slave trade separated fathers, mothers and children,” Uncle Tom’s Cabin” made white readers connect their grief over lost children to the way slave parents felt when their children were forcibly removed.

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In so doing Stowe transformed her loss of Charley into a prophetic engine that stirred the nation, improving the affliction and afflicting the comfortable.  

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2viH9FF97Nw

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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/sally-steenland/roe-and-religion-a-surprising-history_b_2487941.html

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Roe and Religion: A Surprising History

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It may be surprising for some to find out that in the years before the Supreme Court legalized abortion in its landmark 1973 Roe v. Wade decision, clergy were among the staunchest supporters of women seeking an abortion.

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Twenty-one ministers and rabbis created the Clergy Consultation Service on Abortion, an underground network that counseled women and led them to compassionate, competent doctors who provided abortion care. Although the network had only a handful of clergy at first, it grew to about 1,400 clergy operating on the East Coast during the 1960s to serve women from across the nation.

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Rev. Howard Moody — who was born in Texas, lived in New York, and died in 2012 at age 91 — created the network and considered it one of his most important ministries. Women “came from all over the country,” he told an interviewer in 2001. “They came by plane and train, and bus, and car.” Women were desperate and needed help. “It was the most humiliating, frightening prospect for women that you can imagine,” Moody said. He’d seen women die from botched illegal abortions and was stirred by compassion to help them.

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A few years after the Roe decision, a number of religious organizations voiced support for the decision, even as they acknowledged the moral complexity of abortion and honored the sanctity of life. Their views were articulated in an ecumenical study document on abortion published in 1978 and discussed in a recent article on AlterNet.

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In the study document, American Baptist Churches said that, “Abortion should be a matter of personal decision.” The American Lutheran Church agreed, recognizing the “freedom and responsibility of individuals to make their own choices in light of the best information available to them and their understanding of God’s will for their lives.”

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The Church of the Brethren voiced support in the document for women who, “after prayer and counseling, believe abortion is the least destructive alternative available to them.” The Brethren took this position so that women could “make their decision openly, honestly, without the suffering imposed by an uncompromising community.”

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What is even more surprising than the nuanced views of these faith communities, however, is the early support for Roe from the Southern Baptist Convention.

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Although they are currently among the fiercest opponents of abortion, Southern Baptists supported the 1973 ruling.

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From their early days, Southern Baptists have been fervent believers in religious liberty and saw Roe v. Wade in this light.

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If the government could tell a woman what to do with her body, they reasoned, it could also tell Baptists what they could — or couldn’t — do with their religion.

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How things have changed. In the early 1980s, the Republican Party wooed and won the support of millions of religious conservatives, and those nuanced theological truths got buried under a political campaign that claimed God-driven opposition to abortion.

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Conservatives even altered texts of the Bible to fit their rigid antiabortion stance.

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As we approach the 40th anniversary of Roe v. Wade next Tuesday, however, we must challenge that unbending opposition.

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We need to remember another way of thinking — one that supports women’s reproductive health and rights through a lens of morality and faith. We also need to remember that when abortion opponents claim a monopoly on God’s truth, their certainty is less than 40 years old.

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Looking back on history isn’t enough. We must also focus on what to do in the present and what our vision is for the future. Groups such as the Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice, Catholics for Choice, Faith Aloud, the Religious Institute and others are helping to point the way. Each is busy doing a piece of what is needed. These groups are:

  • Arming clergy and faith leaders with compelling messages that are true to their own religious teachings and traditions

  • Educating congregations to connect their religious beliefs and conscience with the moral complexities of life and to claim the sacredness of human sexuality

  • Linking reproductive rights to broader social and economic justice issues such as health care, education, employment and housing — all of which affect a woman’s capacity to be a parent and to raise a child with dignity

  • Challenging the harsh — and often inaccurate — rhetoric of religious conservatives that stigmatizes women and dishonors their capacity to make moral decisions

  • Urging public officials to support women and families in real and meaningful ways rather than setting up roadblocks that harm their health and limit their lives

  • Laying out the true meaning of religious liberty so that this core American value is not used as a smokescreen to limit women’s access to contraception and family planning

The 1978 ecumenical study document articulated the inherent value of the fetus and the importance of reducing the need for abortion. It also held up values of humility, freedom, justice, balance, compassion and responsibility.

 

As we envision a future of health and reproductive justice for all women, those values are more important than ever. We can add to them the words of a just-released affirmation on faith and reproductive justice from CAP’s Faith and Reproductive Justice Leadership Institute. It is a credo of belief in the dignity of all God’s people and a pledge to act — individually and collectively — so that all women can flourish and fulfill their God-given potential as individuals and as parents.

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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/nancy-graham-holm/what-we-can-learn-from-the-sopranos-about-revenge-and-compassion_b_2462102.html

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Revenge and Compassion

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A recent gift of 86 episodes of an old American television series (1999-2007) has reminded me that we sometimes find important lessons in strange places. I concede that in this case the source is entirely improbable, yet nevertheless it offers counter intuitive wisdom that is surprisingly useful in discussions with our children and grandchildren about painful relationships, revenge and the importance of inclusivity. Popular culture frequently serves as an effective discussion facilitator with the young and right now — after Newtown, Conn., and Taft, Calif., we need all the help we can get.

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“The Sopranos” is the story of an Italian-American family inside the criminal society of a New Jersey mafia in which revenge is the standard response to disrespect and disobedience. Episode after episode, brutally executed physical punishments result in hospitalization and a lot of funerals. Everybody has issues with anger management and the characters can’t string 10 words together without using f**k as a verb, noun, adverb or adjective. Why would such a program be popular, indeed, so well liked that it is offered six years later as a Christmas present? What’s so charming about “The Sopranos”?

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What attracts us is Tony Soprano’s nuclear family and the ordinariness — almost pure banality — of their lives parallel to the daily management of a regional mafia organization.

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Inside looking out, Tony and Carmela look just like any other suburban couple trying to raise two kids and get them into college. Tony supports Carmela’s materialism. Carmela copes with her husband’s occasional philandering.

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Tony is in psychotherapy to treat anxiety. Carmela goes to parent-teacher conferences. Tony goes to all his daughter’s soccer games.

For some of us, however, “The Sopranos” was — originally — and continues to be more disturbing than fascinating. It’s demoralizing spending time with the mafia; difficult after an episode not to feel trashy and primitive and a little corrupted for having volunteered to witness cruelty and gratuitous violence.  Originally, some fans said that “The Sopranos” was a program they loved to hate while others hated to love it.  It can certainly be argued that, after all, it is the outstanding writing and superlative acting performances that impress even the skeptical.

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But this merely begs the question.

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Why is immoral behavior worthy of anybody’s attention? Can we learn anything from it? About life?  About ourselves?

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I believe we can.

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1)    First, we can get up close to revenge. Retribution is the opposite of forgiveness and functions as a barrier to further engagement.

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Forgiveness is not about the past but the future. It allows us to move ahead and fulfill potential engagement that would otherwise never happen

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Most of us need to be reminded of this since soul-piercing humiliation and injured feelings often motivate us to either disengage or reciprocate. The characters in “The Sopranos” are not interested, of course, in keeping doors open because they’re preoccupied with survival. For them, revenge is practical. It restores order. As an honor-based culture, the mafia is marginalized from the general society and the benefits of theft and crime outweigh the risks.

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2)    And this brings us to the second lesson we can take away from “The Sopranos,” i.e., the importance of inclusivity. I

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In his book, “The Righteous Mind,” moral psychologist Jonathan Haidt describes how some people find their own worth by feeling superior to others. This mentality fuels prejudice and perpetuates the idea of  “the other” whom in-groups hate and want to dominate. It is no surprise that Irish, Italian, Jewish and Chinese immigrants formed America’s various mafias and tongs since none of these immigrant groups had systematic access to white, Anglo-Saxon Protestant culture. Since most of them have successfully passed through the initiation rite of WASP contempt and assimilated into middle class society, racial prejudice has shifted its attention to Hispanics and that other “other” group, Muslims.

We can use “The Sopranos” to remind ourselves of what happens when groups and individuals are marginalized by a dominant culture. The phenomenon doesn’t stop with ethnic groups. Kids who are systematically bullied are also among the marginalized. At the end of the fifth season, Tony Soprano meets a rival mafia boss and reminds him that, at the end of the day, what they’re all doing is just putting bread and butter on the table. The point is lost, however, since we hear this just when one of the program’s most sympathetic characters, “Adriana,” is unemotionally executed by Tony’s consigliere. This is a terrible moment and most of us react in shocked, embarrassed silence. We distance ourselves psychologically by deciding that the story is “just fiction.”

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An alternative is to shift our detachment to empathy.  We can transform our indifference into compassion and then compassion into a commitment for inclusivity.

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This means transcending “feeling sorry” and instead, actively engaging in the suffering of others by (a) working to change their circumstances; and (b) teaching them to put bread and butter on the table without resorting to crime.

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This proactive response associates us with the core value of all religions: the ethic of reciprocity, otherwise known as The Golden Rule.

The next time you see a re-run of an episode of “The Sopranos,” instead of feeling morally superior because your own life is civilized, take a deep breath and feel gratitude for your good fortune. Share your feelings with the teenagers in your life and use the occasion as a call to action. Make a pledge to honor forgiveness and reaffirm inclusivity through policies that create fairness and opportunity.

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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dr-debbie-magids/finding-motivation_b_2483447.html?utm_hp_ref=gps-for-the-soul&ir=GPS%20for%20the%20Soul

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The ‘Dips’ in Life

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What is the “dip,” you ask? Some call it a slump, writers call it writer’s block, some even call it depression. But we all know it. It’s the feeling that creeps in when we lose our momentum. We feel less excited about something, less energized, and downright defeated. It’s the feeling that — if we don’t fight to push through — is the cause of why we give up on things and stop going for the gold.

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On this particular day, the dip revolved around pushing forward on the projects for this very website. But regardless of the topic, the dip can happen for anyone. It can happen when looking for love, changing careers, going for a promotion, losing weight, trying to live a healthier lifestyle, trying to improve a relationship with your spouse or child… Whatever the topic, the process and feelings are the same when you’re trying to change, overcome, or reach for something.

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At the beginning of something new, everyone has a natural charge. You feel motivated and excited for what the future holds. But then there’s the middle — the part where you’ve put in all of the blood, sweat, and tears, yet you still haven’t seen the fruits of your labor.

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You’ve either hit rejection, haven’t lost a pound, or (in my case) don’t know if anyone is even paying attention to the work you’re doing.

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This is the defining moment for those who make the dream come true, and those who don’t.

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This is where perseverance shines.

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The momentum we need has to come from within. We can’t rely on outside help or reassurances — otherwise we won’t make it to the finish line. Here is where we have to work hard to generate what came to us so naturally in the beginning. We have to purposefully get ourselves into those feelings again, recharge, and forge ahead.

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For me, the best thing to do in those moments is to give in — temporarily. And I know it’s hard. It was for me. I feel like my time is so precious, and now it’s been wasted. But you need to honor how you feel. When I hit a dip, it means I haven’t paid attention to feelings lurking beneath that need to be addressed — feelings of fear or insecurity that have to be dealt with, so I can re-open my channels for creativity.

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As with everything in life, there is always a lesson, and always a reason.

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Because of my dip yesterday, I uncovered some feelings I didn’t know I was having, and have been re-energized.

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And look — it gave me my material for today’s blog, so I didn’t have to experience yet another dip, and hopefully, it’s helped to re-energize you so you can stay the course, and not get defeated when your dips come.

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/01/03/writing-and-eventually-dying-a-good-death-expressing-sharing-love-to-the-end/

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/01/16/does-your-life-have-purpose/

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/01/04/randy-pausch-steven-kalas-living-meaningfully/

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Top five regrets of the dying

A nurse has recorded the most common regrets of the dying, and among the top ones is ‘I wish I hadn’t worked so hard’. What would your biggest regret be if this was your last day of life?

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Bronnie Ware is an Australian nurse who spent several years working in palliative care, caring for patients in the last 12 weeks of their lives. She recorded their dying epiphanies in a blog called Inspiration and Chai, which gathered so much attention that she put her observations into a book called The Top Five Regrets of the Dying.

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Ware writes of the phenomenal clarity of vision that people gain at the end of their lives, and how we might learn from their wisdom. “When questioned about any regrets they had or anything they would do differently,” she says, “common themes surfaced again and again.”

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Here are the top five regrets of the dying, as witnessed by Ware:

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1.   I wish I’d had the courage to live a life true to myself, not the life others expected of me.

“This was the most common regret of all. When people realise that their life is almost over and look back clearly on it, it is easy to see how many dreams have gone unfulfilled. Most people had not honoured even a half of their dreams and had to die knowing that it was due to choices they had made, or not made. Health brings a freedom very few realise, until they no longer have it.”

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2.   I wish I hadn’t worked so hard.

“This came from every male patient that I nursed. They missed their children’s youth and their partner’s companionship. Women also spoke of this regret, but as most were from an older generation, many of the female patients had not been breadwinners. All of the men I nursed deeply regretted spending so much of their lives on the treadmill of a work existence.”

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3.   I wish I’d had the courage to express my feelings.

“Many people suppressed their feelings in order to keep peace with others. As a result, they settled for a mediocre existence and never became who they were truly capable of becoming. Many developed illnesses relating to the bitterness and resentment they carried as a result.”

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4.   I wish I had stayed in touch with my friends.

“Often they would not truly realise the full benefits of old friends until their dying weeks and it was not always possible to track them down. Many had become so caught up in their own lives that they had let golden friendships slip by over the years. There were many deep regrets about not giving friendships the time and effort that they deserved. Everyone misses their friends when they are dying.”

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5.   I wish that I had let myself be happier.

“This is a surprisingly common one. Many did not realise until the end that happiness is a choice. They had stayed stuck in old patterns and habits. The so-called ‘comfort’ of familiarity overflowed into their emotions, as well as their physical lives. Fear of change had them pretending to others, and to their selves, that they were content, when deep within, they longed to laugh properly and have silliness in their life again.”

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What’s your greatest regret so far, and what will you set out to achieve or change before you die?

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144 Responses to Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Prophetic Engine — sage Joan D. Hedrick

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  5. Pingback: sage Rev. James Martin: Liberation theology has also animated some of the great Christian witnesses of our time. Several of my brother Jesuits (and their companions), some of whom wrote and taught liberation theology, were assassinated at the University o

  6. Pingback: sage Rev. James Martin: Liberation theology has also animated some of the great Christian witnesses of our time. Several of my brother Jesuits (and their companions), some of whom wrote and taught liberation theology, were assassinated at the University o

  7. Pingback: sage Rev. James Martin: Liberation theology has also animated some of the great Christian witnesses of our time. Several of my brother Jesuits (and their companions), some of whom wrote and taught liberation theology, were assassinated at the University o

  8. Pingback: sage Rev. James Martin: Liberation theology has also animated some of the great Christian witnesses of our time. Several of my brother Jesuits (and their companions), some of whom wrote and taught liberation theology, were assassinated at the University o

  9. Pingback: sage Rev. James Martin: Liberation theology has also animated some of the great Christian witnesses of our time. Several of my brother Jesuits (and their companions), some of whom wrote and taught liberation theology, were assassinated at the University o

  10. Pingback: sage Rev. James Martin: Liberation theology has also animated some of the great Christian witnesses of our time. Several of my brother Jesuits (and their companions), some of whom wrote and taught liberation theology, were assassinated at the University o

  11. Pingback: sage Rev. James Martin: Liberation theology has also animated some of the great Christian witnesses of our time. Several of my brother Jesuits (and their companions), some of whom wrote and taught liberation theology, were assassinated at the University o

  12. Pingback: sage Rev. James Martin: Liberation theology has also animated some of the great Christian witnesses of our time. Several of my brother Jesuits (and their companions), some of whom wrote and taught liberation theology, were assassinated at the University o

  13. Pingback: sage Rev. James Martin: Liberation theology has also animated some of the great Christian witnesses of our time. Several of my brother Jesuits (and their companions), some of whom wrote and taught liberation theology, were assassinated at the University o

  14. Pingback: sage Rev. James Martin: Liberation theology has also animated some of the great Christian witnesses of our time. Several of my brother Jesuits (and their companions), some of whom wrote and taught liberation theology, were assassinated at the University o

  15. Pingback: sage Rev. James Martin: Liberation theology has also animated some of the great Christian witnesses of our time. Several of my brother Jesuits (and their companions), some of whom wrote and taught liberation theology, were assassinated at the University o

  16. Pingback: sage Rev. James Martin: Liberation theology has also animated some of the great Christian witnesses of our time. Several of my brother Jesuits (and their companions), some of whom wrote and taught liberation theology, were assassinated at the University o

  17. Pingback: sage Rev. James Martin: Liberation theology has also animated some of the great Christian witnesses of our time. Several of my brother Jesuits (and their companions), some of whom wrote and taught liberation theology, were assassinated at the University o

  18. Pingback: sage Rev. James Martin: Liberation theology has also animated some of the great Christian witnesses of our time. Several of my brother Jesuits (and their companions), some of whom wrote and taught liberation theology, were assassinated at the University o

  19. Pingback: sage Rev. James Martin: Liberation theology has also animated some of the great Christian witnesses of our time. Several of my brother Jesuits (and their companions), some of whom wrote and taught liberation theology, were assassinated at the University o

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  24. Pingback: If we’re going to write, it is because we have a desire to express ourselves, even if we don’t quite understand what we wish to say. It might just be an inner yearning, but by making the choice to engage in the process rather than the result, our work

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  35. Pingback: great sage Rev. James Martin on liberation theology | Curtis Narimatsu

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  43. Pingback: Sage Mike Bagwell: Yet Jesus’ apostles “turned the world upside down” … for Jesus! These are the exact words of Luke the historian in Acts 17:6. | Curtis Narimatsu

  44. Pingback: Sage Dave Trenholm: Jesus ate meals with Rome’s tax collectors and other disreputable sinners – the lowest of the low – because by simply eating with those people, He was letting them know that they were important to him. If you ate with anyone

  45. Pingback: Sage Fred R. Anderson: How could the lawful Pharisees not praise God for that? But still, they must keep their eye on Jesus, for his ways are not their own ways, nor those of John the Baptist and his disciples for that matter. Look at those with whom Jesu

  46. Pingback: Margaret M. Mitchell: To describe modern Christians on the basis of their proclamations??? | Curtis Narimatsu

  47. Pingback: Unforgiveness is a major cause of depression, many people have unforgiveness but are not even aware of it because it is buried so deep inside. — Seek God Ministries | Curtis Narimatsu

  48. Pingback: Jesus continually sought out marginalised people to befriend. An immense compassion drew him toward poor people, those with leprosy (who were regarded as outcasts) and tax collectors (who were loathed as traitors). Jesus had friends who would feel at home

  49. Pingback: Jesus’ invitation was for “the poor, the crippled, the lame, the blind” to share in the Kingdom of God, a feast of equals, of open commensality, where there is no distinctions at the table. Jesus broke down barriers by lifting up those s

  50. Pingback: Richard J. Henderson: Once a journalist who had come to report about her mission, looked at her huddled over the body of a dying, destitute man. He said, “You couldn’t pay me to do that kind of work!” Hearing him, Mother Teresa turned an

  51. Pingback: Time and again His parables sought to justify His association with outcasts (Lk. 14:15-24; 15:1-32; Mt. 18:23-25; 20:1-15; 21:28-32). — Carelinks Ministries | Curtis Narimatsu

  52. Pingback: Richard J. Henderson: Once a journalist who had come to report about her mission, looked at her huddled over the body of a dying, destitute man. He said, “You couldn’t pay me to do that kind of work!” Hearing him, Mother Teresa turned an

  53. Pingback: Sage Edward F. Markquart: In Jesus’ parables, the accent is always on the last figure, on the last personality of the story. That is where the focus is. For example, in my opening stories, the focus is on the third stringers who had a change of heart an

  54. Pingback: Jesus’ life was full of paradoxes: the shepherds who first came to him were the lowest of the low, wandering around in fetid clothes, while the magi were some of the highest in their society. Baby Jesus was surrounded by the pungent smell of animal excr

  55. Pingback: Jesus’ invitation was for “the poor, the crippled, the lame, the blind” to share in the Kingdom of God, a feast of equals, of open commensality, where there is no distinction at the table. Jesus broke down barriers by lifting up those sh

  56. Pingback: Sage Marci Glass: Jesus doesn’t seem to care WHY the other man is in this situation. But Jesus does seem to care enough about this man, this foreign, tomb-dwelling, demon possessed man to heal him. | Curtis Narimatsu

  57. Pingback: David Wilson: If you’ve not been beat up, downcast and broken at some point in your life, stop reading now. For the unscarred and unscathed, I have nothing further to share. I am thankful you have ventured here and wish you continued smooth sailing.

  58. Pingback: The kicker, the twist in this story, is the guest list and the etiquette. Jesus says, Don’t make the rich people, the healthy people, the prominent and powerful first. Nope, invite the poorest, the sick, the cripples, the lowest of the low. They’re th

  59. Pingback: The kicker, the twist in this story, is the guest list and the etiquette. Jesus says, Don’t make the rich people, the healthy people, the prominent and powerful first. Nope, invite the poorest, the sick, the cripples, the lowest of the low. They’re th

  60. Pingback: In the case of Christ we have a unique form of persuasion. It is like what happens when an error in our viewpoint is shown to us, and our mind reassembles around the truth that we have not seen. But it is unlike this process in that the truth that takes u

  61. Pingback: In the case of Christ we have a unique form of persuasion. It is like what happens when an error in our viewpoint is shown to us, and our mind reassembles around the truth that we have not seen. But it is unlike this process in that the truth that takes u

  62. Pingback: Jesus violated every conceivable tradition when it came to His associations with the marginalized of Jewish society. He infuriated the Pharisees with every compassionate touch. The Qumran community of the Essenes had an unconditional law: “No madman, or

  63. Pingback: This is why when the almighty God came into the world in Jesus, he came as the lowest of the low, as weakness itself, as a complete and utter nothing. — Robert L. Short | Curtis Narimatsu

  64. Pingback: The beautiful word minister, or Huperetes in Greek, has a very special meaning. It is the name of a very low slave, the lowest of the low. This slave was either shanghaied from his home or from the streets or taken from prison or simply kidnapped and was

  65. Pingback: What did Jesus see? — Judy of Rapture Ready | Curtis Narimatsu

  66. Pingback: They heard him preach about how the smallest, lowest, and least among them, were precious in God’s eyes, and the greatest in the Kingdom of God. — Malina & Altenburg | Curtis Narimatsu

  67. Pingback: We typically refuse to help those who are the source of suffering, disappointment, injustice, humiliation, or disgust. — David Chadwell | Curtis Narimatsu

  68. Pingback: But compassion seems to drive religious people’s charitable feelings LESS than other groups — the more religious ground their generosity less in emotion, and more in doctrine, communal identity, or reputational concerns. | Curtis Narimatsu

  69. Pingback: The Pharisees’ statement is intended as a stinging rebuke. It’s not really a question, it’s kind of a rhetorical question, intended to be vindictive and bitter. It’s outrage, why do you eat and drink with the tax gatherers and sinn

  70. Pingback: After all, where was Jesus found most of the time? For me, I see Jesus living and interacting with beggars, prostitutes and tax collectors the lowest of the low in His society. And by choice and association Jesus himself was one of the marginalized, and I

  71. Pingback: God who is so high above the nations, reigning from heaven, still looks down upon the earth to the poorest of the poor, the lowliest of the low…God cares for these folks that are often overlooked. When the Psalmist asks us, “Who is like the Lord our G

  72. Pingback: God who is so high above the nations, reigning from heaven, still looks down upon the earth to the poorest of the poor, the lowliest of the low…God cares for these folks that are often overlooked. When the Psalmist asks us, “Who is like the Lord our G

  73. Pingback: After all, where was Jesus found most of the time? For me, I see Jesus living and interacting with beggars, prostitutes and tax collectors — the lowest of the low in His society. And by choice and association Jesus himself was one of the marginalize

  74. Pingback: They heard him preach about how the smallest, lowest, and least among them — were precious in God’s eyes, and the greatest in the Kingdom of God. — Malina & Altenburg | Curtis Narimatsu

  75. Pingback: God who is so high above the nations, reigning from heaven, still looks down upon the earth to the poorest of the poor, the lowliest of the low…God cares for these folks that are often overlooked. When the Psalmist asks us, “Who is like the Lord our G

  76. Pingback: God who is so high above the nations, reigning from heaven, still looks down upon the earth to the poorest of the poor, the lowliest of the low…God cares for these folks that are often overlooked. When the Psalmist asks us, “Who is like the Lord our G

  77. Pingback: Jesus answered and said to him, “What I do you do not realize now but you shall understand hereafter.” You don’t get it, Peter, you don’t get My humiliation. You think this is too lowly for Me, you think this is too humble for Me,

  78. Pingback: How often do we judge others? I’ll be the first to say that it’s definitely more than it should be. Without even realizing, we judge instantly based on appearance. In the back of our minds, we convince ourselves we are better because we don

  79. Pingback: If you were in the bottom of a hole.. who would you most resent helping you out of the hole? Just think about it….. ‘Cause that’s whom Jesus calls you to love. — April Coates | Curtis Narimatsu

  80. Pingback: Healing the sick. Loving the unloved. Welcoming the unwelcomed. Gathering the little ones. Receiving the rejected and abandoned. Comforting the elders. The Paschal Mystery (Passover) is the greatest act of compassion. God, suffering with us, putting every

  81. Pingback: Many of us claim to love humanity even – the lowest of the low like lepers, prostitutes, and tax-collectors. (Now you know why income tax returns are due at Easter). In affirming the lowest of the low Jesus affirmed humanity. In His emphasis upon th

  82. Pingback: Many of us claim to love humanity even – the lowest of the low like lepers, prostitutes, and tax-collectors. (Now you know why income tax returns are due at Easter). In affirming the lowest of the low Jesus affirmed humanity. In His emphasis upon th

  83. Pingback: Many of us claim to love humanity even – the lowest of the low like lepers, prostitutes, and tax-collectors. (Now you know why income tax returns are due at Easter). In affirming the lowest of the low Jesus affirmed humanity. In His emphasis upon th

  84. Pingback: Here’s the power of hospitality—this willingness to go out of our way to invite and welcome and include those who formerly felt themselves to be on the outside looking in, creating holy space where those who formerly felt themselves to be alienated an

  85. Pingback: But is that the way Jesus treated tax collectors and other outsiders? Matthew 11, verse 19 refers to Jesus as “a friend of tax collectors and sinners”. Time and again in the gospels we witness Jesus befriending those whom others have cast asid

  86. Pingback: But is that the way Jesus treated tax collectors and other outsiders? Matthew 11, verse 19 refers to Jesus as “a friend of tax collectors and sinners”. Time and again in the gospels we witness Jesus befriending those whom others have cast asid

  87. Pingback: Jesus stood in the face of all social convention, and loudly proclaimed that those that see the spirituality of service, and sacrifice, are closer to the kingdom of God, than those with correct doctrine, correct church, and correct lineage. Jesus, this ra

  88. Pingback: Do you know Him? | Curtis Narimatsu

  89. Pingback: Jesus stood in the face of all social convention, and loudly proclaimed that those that see the spirituality of service, and sacrifice, are closer to the kingdom of God, than those with correct doctrine, correct church, and correct lineage. Jesus, this ra

  90. Pingback: But is that the way Jesus treated tax collectors and other outsiders? Matthew 11, verse 19 refers to Jesus as “a friend of tax collectors and sinners”. Time and again in the gospels we witness Jesus befriending those whom others have cast asid

  91. Pingback: How often do we judge others? I’ll be the first to say that it’s definitely more than it should be. Without even realizing, we judge instantly based on appearance. In the back of our minds, we convince ourselves we are better because we don

  92. Pingback: In praise of Lester Chun: Intentionality & the Holy Spirit within oneself | Curtis Narimatsu

  93. Pingback: The Christian distinction which separates Christianity from earlier religions: Matthew 5:44 — Love your enemies, bless those who curse you, do good to those who hate you, and pray for those who mistreat you and persecute you. | Curtis Narimatsu

  94. Pingback: What is not in your power to do — to change your enemy — thence, help heal your pain by letting go of your vengeance | Curtis Narimatsu

  95. Pingback: Of a Natalia Stavas — Bombs, Instincts and Morals: Why Heroes Risk It All for Strangers — Jeffrey Kluger | Curtis Narimatsu

  96. Pingback: “To be yourself in a world that is constantly trying to make you something else is the greatest accomplishment.” — Ralph Waldo Emerson — Embracing Authenticity — by Randy Hain | Curtis Narimatsu

  97. Pingback: My Saint — Oscar Romero — and a flourishing of the Social Gospel, with credit to current Pope Francis | Curtis Narimatsu

  98. Pingback: Karyl McBride: Why Am I So Afraid of Being Alone? It may even clear your thoughts about what is healthy for you. “Sometimes it takes darkness and the sweet confinement of your aloneness to learn that anything or anyone that does not bring you alive

  99. Pingback: Karyl McBride: Why Am I So Afraid of Being Alone? It may even clear your thoughts about what is healthy for you. “Sometimes it takes darkness and the sweet confinement of your aloneness to learn that anything or anyone that does not bring you alive

  100. Pingback: Karyl McBride: Why Am I So Afraid of Being Alone? It may even clear your thoughts about what is healthy for you. “Sometimes it takes darkness and the sweet confinement of your aloneness to learn that anything or anyone that does not bring you alive

  101. Pingback: Living well[spring] | Curtis Narimatsu

  102. Pingback: How to deal with loneliness: To stop feeling lonely, we first must accept that we are feeling lonely. Sometimes admitting that to ourselves is difficult. We then have to express those feelings of loneliness in some way. We might find ourselves writing in

  103. Pingback: How to deal with loneliness: To stop feeling lonely, we first must accept that we are feeling lonely. Sometimes admitting that to ourselves is difficult. We then have to express those feelings of loneliness in some way. We might find ourselves writing in

  104. Pingback: How to deal with loneliness: To stop feeling lonely, we first must accept that we are feeling lonely. Sometimes admitting that to ourselves is difficult. We then have to express those feelings of loneliness in some way. We might find ourselves writing in

  105. Pingback: As the recent history of American Protestantism proves, when faith becomes the servant of partisan politics, even a great religious tradition can lose its soul. So, where have all the Protestants gone? They are swelling the ranks of America’s fastes

  106. Pingback: “This is Water” – David Foster Wallace — Wallace used many forms of irony, but focused on individuals’ continued longing for earnest, unselfconscious experience and communication in a media-saturated society. Wallace helped u

  107. Pingback: “Ultimately I was fascinated by Gatsby as a character. I was moved by him. It no longer became a love story to me. It became a tragedy of this new American, this man in a new world where everything is possible, and at a time of great opulence in the

  108. Pingback: Ask yourself the ultimate questions in your life. Who am I? What is my purpose? What is important to me? How do I live an authentic life? By asking the ultimate questions in your life, you begin the lifelong journey inward, a journey of reflection, contem

  109. Pingback: Ask yourself the ultimate questions in your life. Who am I? What is my purpose? What is important to me? How do I live an authentic life? By asking the ultimate questions in your life, you begin the lifelong journey inward, a journey of reflection, contem

  110. Pingback: Ask yourself the ultimate questions in your life. Who am I? What is my purpose? What is important to me? How do I live an authentic life? By asking the ultimate questions in your life, you begin the lifelong journey inward, a journey of reflection, contem

  111. Pingback: Jesus’ death becomes even more powerful when this particular messiah also carries your personal projections. That is, the celebrity’s life mirrors important pieces of your own psychic journey. Your own life dramas. Jesus did this for me with h

  112. Pingback: Jesus’ death becomes even more powerful when this particular messiah also carries your personal projections. That is, the celebrity’s life mirrors important pieces of your own psychic journey. Your own life dramas. Jesus did this for me with h

  113. Pingback: Jesus’ death becomes even more powerful when this particular messiah also carries your personal projections. That is, the celebrity’s life mirrors important pieces of your own psychic journey. Your own life dramas. Jesus did this for me with h

  114. Pingback: sage Steven Kalas: death isn’t extraordinary. And therefore my own personal death can’t be extraordinary. My death is not even one of the more important parts of me. Only authenticity can make you wealthy in spirit, and this richness includes sufferin

  115. Pingback: sage Steven Kalas: Death isn’t extraordinary. And therefore my own personal death can’t be extraordinary. My death is not even one of the more important parts of me. Only authenticity can make you wealthy in spirit, and this richness includes sufferin

  116. Pingback: We all have the power to pick our attitudes | Curtis Narimatsu

  117. Pingback: Then Jesus cleansed the temple of everything evil about us — then in typical mob hysteria, we “cleansed” ourselves of Jesus via His Crucifixion | Curtis Narimatsu

  118. Pingback: In praise of nickname Stoner’s bridging the proverbial age gap — from Stoner age 43 to Peter age 66: “You are not an uptight jerk” (like other ultra-judgmental old farts!!) | Curtis Narimatsu

  119. Pingback: In praise of nickname Stoner’s bridging the proverbial generation gap — from Stoner age 43 to Peter age 66: “You are not an uptight jerk” (like other ultra-judgmental old farts!!) | Curtis Narimatsu

  120. Pingback: Ambivalence: The hair-thin line between being thrilled (Jesus our savior comes to our town Jerusalem) and being threatened (our own ambivalence — Jesus cleanses the temple of everything evil about ourselves — we feel threatened by Jesus reveal

  121. Pingback: Ambivalence: The hair-thin line between being thrilled (Jesus our savior comes to our town Jerusalem) and being threatened (our own ambivalence — Jesus cleanses the temple of everything evil about ourselves — we feel threatened by Jesus reveal

  122. Pingback: Love-hate dynamic of mob hysteria in praising, then killing Jesus — all within a week’s time | Curtis Narimatsu

  123. Pingback: So Jesus exposed our unlovely selves (Jesus’ cleansing of the temple by ridding it of our money-changers) — we didn’t have to kill Jesus — we could have sublimated our primal fears about our hypocritical nature — and instead

  124. Pingback: We depraved humans are so fickle, to say the least — my recount of Jesus’ exposure of our mob hysteria 2,000 yrs. ago — nothing has changed in us since then — we still are a mob in senseless hysteria | Curtis Narimatsu

  125. Pingback: Aquinas is equidistant to early church father Augustine 400 yrs. before Aquinas — and to us 400 yrs. after 1200 AD Aquinas — yet, nothing has changed in us — we still are as depraved today as we were when we crucified Jesus in our sensel

  126. Pingback: Aquinas is equidistant to early church father Augustine 800 yrs. before Aquinas — and to us 800 yrs. after 1200 AD Aquinas — yet, nothing has changed in us — we still are as depraved today as we were when we crucified Jesus in our sensel

  127. Pingback: Aquinas is equidistant to early church father Augustine 800 yrs. before Aquinas — and to us 800 yrs. after 1200 AD Aquinas — yet, nothing has changed in us — we still are as depraved today as we were when we crucified Jesus in our sensel

  128. Pingback: Nothing has changed in us — we still are as depraved today as we were when we crucified Jesus in our senseless mob hysteria — Aquinas is equidistant to early church father Augustine 800 yrs. before Aquinas — and to us 800 yrs. after 1200

  129. Pingback: We depraved humans of immense despair — nothing has changed in us — we still are as depraved today as we were when we crucified Jesus in our senseless mob hysteria — Aquinas is equidistant to early church father Augustine 800 yrs. before

  130. Pingback: We depraved humans of immense despair — nothing has changed in us — we still are as depraved today as we were when we crucified Jesus in our senseless mob hysteria — Aquinas is equidistant to early church father Augustine 800 yrs. before

  131. Pingback: We are depraved humans steeped in immense despair — nothing has changed in us — we still are as depraved today as we were when we crucified Jesus in our senseless mob hysteria — Aquinas is equidistant to early church father Augustine 800

  132. Pingback: We are depraved humans steeped in immense despair — nothing has changed in us — we still are as depraved today as we were when we crucified Jesus in our senseless mob hysteria — Aquinas is equidistant to early church father Augustine 800

  133. Pingback: Jesus’ mind-blowing “huli ‘au” (upside down) overturning of this world of our flesh — Jesus violated every conceivable tradition when it came to His associations with the marginalized of Jewish society. He infuriated the Phar

  134. Pingback: Mind-blowing Jesus stands inexplicably before us, and Jesus turns common-sense ideas upside down/”huli ‘au,” confounding us all! Dedicated to authentic Ri-in!! | Curtis Narimatsu

  135. Pingback: Life is full of reversals of expectations, baby!! Dedicated to my little girl Staycie age 40 — my separation anxiety from my baby girl when she turned 18 & left home to live on her own turned out to be her greatest crossover to independence R

  136. Pingback: Hawaii’s greatest modern wayfinder Rev. Hung Wai Ching (1905-2002) alter ego Rev. Reinhold Niebuhr (1892-1971) — Niebuhr’s immensely popular Serenity Prayer: “Taking, as Jesus did, this sinful world as it is, not as I would have it

  137. Pingback: Calvinism, we keep being reminded, was the faith of the Puritans who settled most early American colonies, and its teachings are reflected in founding documents. Since the U.S. Constitution is so preoccupied with checks and balances, some old-timers found

  138. Pingback: Calvinism, we keep being reminded, was the faith of the Puritans who settled most early American colonies, and its teachings are reflected in founding documents. Since the U.S. Constitution is so preoccupied with checks and balances, some old-timers found

  139. Pingback: To love and be loved are what life is all about | Curtis Narimatsu

  140. Pingback: I’m here to love and be loved | Curtis Narimatsu

  141. Pingback: Nobody comes to therapy who hasn’t lost something. The heart is injured. Limping. Constrained by psychic adhesions. Aching, either obviously or just behind the curtain of consciousness. The therapeutic relationship is the MRI. It reveals what’s torn.

  142. Pingback: Nobody comes to therapy who hasn’t lost something. The heart is injured. Limping. Constrained by psychic adhesions. Aching, either obviously or just behind the curtain of consciousness. The therapeutic relationship is the MRI. It reveals what’s torn.

  143. Pingback: To love and to be loved are mystical desires a la Carl Jung’s archetypes (Jung’s forebearers were mystics Plato, Apostle Paul, & Augustine) | Curtis Narimatsu

  144. Pingback: The young man with terminal cancer was going to die quicker than he thought, and he was very depressed about this. And of course he hadn’t gotten to make his mark, and he had this conversation with this young woman. And the young woman said, “No,

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