Great therapist Shakespeare’s symbolic sister, indomitable Edith Wharton

 Edith Wharton

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http://domapp01.shu.edu/depts/uc/apps/libraryrepository.nsf/resourceid/CF84B8297E1C27DD85256E23005244DE/$File/Boemo-Nancy-C.pdf?Open

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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/01/24/edith-wharton-birthday-_n_2533327.html?utm_hp_ref=books

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Zoë Triska

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Today would have been Edith Wharton’s 151st birthday. It was less than a year ago that Jonathan Franzen simply dismissed the great author as being an unattractive woman, but I think Edith Wharton was a hottie, a badass, and an amazing writer. To Franzen’s criticisms, I respond with a quote from the great woman herself: ““After all, one knows one’s weak points so well that it’s rather bewildering to have the critics overlook them and invent others.”

Didn’t like Ethan Frome when you read it in high school? Though I loved it, I can see how you might think it’s depressing! Try The House of Mirth or The Age of Innocence? (I’d recommend the latter over the former). Her short stories are also great! Try “Roman Fever” or “The Other Two.”

In honor of her birthday, here are some reasons why I think she is one of the coolest writers on the planet (I also wrote my thesis on her in college, which might be partially why I love her so much).

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  • She was the first woman to win a Pulitzer Prize!

    For <em>The Age of Innocence</em> in 1921.

  • She had published poems in magazines by the age of 18.

    Had YOU published poems in magazines by 18?

  • An adaptation of her writing won a Pulitzer Prize.

    A dramatization of her novella <em>The Old Maid</em> won the Pulitzer Prize in 1935. She basically won <em>two </em>Pulitzer Prizes in her lifetime.

  • She was BFF with Henry James.

    Birds of a feather flock together. I bet they had a lot of fun. I’m jealous.

  • She wrote a novella that is required reading in many high school English classes.

    English teachers across the country make their students read <em>Ethan Frome</em>. That’s pretty awesome.

  • She designed and built her own home.

    She was great at garden designing and interior designing. She designed and built <a href=”http://www.edithwharton.org/”>her home ‘The Mount,’ which is seriously one of the most beautiful buildings we’ve ever seen. </a>Lots of weddings are now held there (hopefully one day that will include mine).

  • She was a good samaritan.

    During World War I, she was able to go to the front lines of the war in France. She did relief work for refugees by setting up hospitals, hostels, and work rooms for jobless women.

  • There was a Vogue photo shoot based off her life last year.

    Both Jeffrey Eugenides AND Junot Diaz <a href=”http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/08/30/edith-wharton-vogue_n_1844117.html”>made starring appearances.</a> When has a dead author <em>ever</em> been the theme of a Vogue photo shoot?!

  • She received an honorary degree from Yale.

    <a href=”http://public.wsu.edu/~campbelld/wharton/photo7.htm”>Wharton received an honorary Doctor of Letters degree from Yale in 1923. </a>She was the first woman to receive such an honor from the Ivy League school. Many of her letters and manuscripts are now on display there.

  • The phrase “keeping up with the Joneses” might be about Edith Wharton’s family.

    Wharton was born Edith Newbold Jones. Her family, the Joneses, were a prominent, wealthy New York family. Some historians believe that this idiom may have been originally referring to her family<a href=”http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keeping_up_with_the_Joneses”&gt; (though there are also other guesses at to where it came from). </a> (This image is Edith Wharton as a child. What a cutie).

  • She was the first woman to receive full membership to the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

    This happened <a href=”https://www.edithwharton.org/edith-wharton/biography/”>in 1926. </a>

 

 

11 Reasons Edith Wharton Is Awesome

1 of 12

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edith_Wharton#Writing_style

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Writing style

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Many of Wharton’s novels are characterized by a subtle use of dramatic irony. Having grown up in upper-class pre-World War I society, Wharton became one of its most astute critics, in such works as The House of Mirth and The Age of Innocence.

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/01/20/spiritual-but-not-religious-much-ado-about-nothing-shakespeare/

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File:Much Ado Quarto.JPG

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Much_Ado_Quarto.JPG

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Much_Ado_About_Nothing#Analysis

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The de-stabilizing of traditional gender clichés appears to have inflamed anxieties about the erosion of social order.

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It seems that comic drama could be a means of calming such anxieties. Benedick wittily gives voice to male anxieties about women’s “sharp tongues and proneness to sexual lightness.”

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In the patriarchal society of the play, the men’s loyalties were governed by conventional codes of honour and camaraderie and a sense of superiority to women.

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Assumptions that women are by nature prone to inconstancy are shown in the repeated jokes on cuckoldry and partly explain Claudio’s readiness to believe the slur against Hero. This stereotype is turned on its head in Balthasar’s song, which shows men to be the deceitful and inconstant sex that women must suffer.

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2012/11/01/great-political-therapist-shakespeare/

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2012/10/16/the-paradox-of-solitaire-vis-a-vis-au-paire-and-the-great-therapist-shakespeare/

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2012/10/12/rich-vs-poor-health-care-and-the-quality-of-mercy-is-not-strained-per-the-great-therapist-shakespeare/

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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/lesleyann-coker/shakespeare-contemporary-retellings_b_2507897.html?utm_hp_ref=books

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Shakespeare Is Hot Again

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The pop culture interest in Shakespeare is driven by his plays ubiquitous themes, which translate well to today’s audience.  “The heightened drama and emotions in Shakespeare’s plays feel very true to the experience of being a teenager,” Askew said.  “Many of his characters are young people facing the same issues teens and — and adults — will always face: the drama of falling in (and out of) love, dysfunctional families, the question of where you rank in the social sphere…it’s very easy to take his universal themes and make them relatable to the modern era.  His plays are very ‘of the now’ in whatever time period they’re read.”

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2 Responses to Great therapist Shakespeare’s symbolic sister, indomitable Edith Wharton

  1. Pingback: Greatest personal relations therapist Shakespeare: In his last public lecture, T.S. Eliot remarked that “So great is Shakespeare…that a lifetime is hardly enough for growing up to appreciate him,” and in one of his last essays he declare

  2. Pingback: Greatest personal relations therapist Shakespeare: In his last public lecture, T.S. Eliot remarked that “So great is Shakespeare…that a lifetime is hardly enough for growing up to appreciate him,” and in one of his last essays he declare

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