In praise of Moses Gonsalves

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http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+blessed+are+the+meek&qpvt=images+blessed+are+the+meek&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=9255862571C3AD0D5E000C7153AE21C233C5735F&selectedIndex=17

How To Forgive

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Moses humbles himself and bites his lip, no matter his impulses/urges.    Moses seeks humbleness of spirit, per Matthew 5’s “blessed are the meek, for they shall inherit the earth & the Kingdom of Heaven.”

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Moses’ mission is to share Moses’ Maker Jesus’ Love for All.    Actually, Moses has self-actualized and is true to himself in sharing the Word of Faith, so to speak.    Moses fulfills Jesus’ mission for Moses by bestowing love to all creatures, both large and small.

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Moses’ daily trial is to keep himself humble and to evangelize to the lost souls, so to speak.     Moses shall apply Jesus’ precepts, Pericopes, Parables, & aphorisms till Moses’ last breath drawn of this world, after which Moses shall seek Jesus’ Love via everlasting life.   Moses has a great grasp of Logos/Scripture’s Written Word, and Jesus has instructed Moses to share Rhema/Application of the Gospel, with everyone both near and afar.    Which are why Moses’ evolution and walk in Faith have import to everyone  — the purpose-driven life, so to speak (no, not Rick Warren’s cafeteria Christianity version –mass-appeal subculture of megachurches  —

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cafeteria_Christianity#Usage).

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Rhema (application of Scripture)    —

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http://blog.chron.com/lutherant/2012/11/global-child-poverty-changing-the-story/

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When it comes to helping people in need, one of the stories that should spark our imagination remains Jesus’ parable of the good Samaritan.  The aspect of the parable I would point out here is its personal nature.  To demonstrate how (and to whom) we ought to show compassion Jesus does not speak in generalities.  He gives a specific situation, where one individual (the Samaritan) must make a decision about how to treat another, specific individual (the Jew set upon by robbers).  Christian mercy is not about generalized theories, but about specifics.

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Rhema (inner voice) & life application  –

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/02/12/thriving-learning-having-wisdom-are-about-getting-up-each-morning-with-intention-clarity-commitment-to-seek-nurture-connection-along-lifes-healthy-healing-path-of-inner-nouris/

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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/matthew-hutson/the-rich-are-differently-_b_2990395.html?utm_hp_ref=science

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The researchers suggest wealth and status reduce empathy because money allows one to be independent, rather than relying on others in one’s community for resources and survival (and returning the favor). Instead of borrowing a cup of milk from a neighbor, they send their animatronic butler out to milk their solid gold cow, etc.

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It’s worth noting, as The Atlantic does in their current issue, that the lowest-earning 20 percent of Americans donated 3.2 percent of their income to charity in 2011, while the highest-earning 20 percent donated only 1.3 percent. And of the 50 largest charitable gifts in 2012, none went to organizations focused on social service or poverty. The big winners: elite universities and museums. Because, really, holding a charity gala in your honor at a soup kitchen is just so… déclassé.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesus_of_Nazareth_(film)#Controversy

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In making his film, Zeffirelli explicitly wished to deemphasize the traditional accusation of deicide against the Jews. Some 26 years later, Zeffirelli laid blame for this very error against The Passion of the Christ (2004), which was produced and directed by Mel Gibson. Zeffirelli had directed Gibson in Hamlet (1990).

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Guardian

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http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2004/feb/27/religion.catholicism

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Mel Gibson has reneged on a promise to remove the infamous scriptural blood libel, in which the Jews allegedly accepted responsibility for the crucifixion of Jesus, from his film The Passion of the Christ, according to one of the world’s foremost scholars, who saw a preview showing yesterday.

Jewish groups pleaded with the director to remove the line from Matthew 27 in which the Jews were said to have cried: “His blood be on us and on our children” – words used across the ages to justify anti-semitic persecution by Christians. 

But it became clear at the film’s first British screening for journalists, theologians and clergy that although Gibson has removed the English subtitle for the line, the words remain in the film, exclaimed in Aramaic. Although few in the audience will understand it, the decision to retain the line makes clear Gibson’s reluctance to be swayed by the fears of complainants. 

Geza Vermes, a former professor of Jewish Studies at Oxford and the author of five books on the life of Christ, writes of the film in today’s Guardian: “I have never seen anything so dreadful and I hope I never will.” 

The blood-spattered two-hour film about the crucifixion – in which all the dialogue is in contemporary languages with English subtitles – has provoked complaints from Britain’s Jewish organisations but a broad welcome from evangelical Christians and Catholics. 

Prof Vermes immediately picked holes in the film, criticising its use of “Catholic church Latin” by the Roman soldiers instead of the Greek they would have spoken, pointing out that Pilate is referred to as the “governor” rather than the prefect of the province and spotting that the wrong Aramaic word for God is used throughout. 

The British Board of Deputies of British Jews said: “It would have been better if this film had never been made. The glorification of violence and bloodshed and the reinforcement of medieval stereotyping of the Jewish people are extremely dangerous.” 

But Joel Edwards, general director of the Evangelical Alliance, said: “[We] believe the film will provide a good opportunity for Christians to talk to others about Jesus.” 

In Rome, the veteran Italian film director Franco Zeffirelli, who himself made a controversial film about the life of Christ, said Gibson was “sinisterly attracted to the most unrestrained violence”. 

In an article for the newspaper Corriere della Sera, Zeffirelli wrote: “[In America] mothers want at all costs for their children to see the film… What conclusion will children in particular be able to draw from it other than that the Jews were to blame for all that bloodshed? This way we set ourselves back centuries.” 

Gibson himself seemed ambivalent about the film’s effect on him. In one interview, quoted in the Daily Telegraph, he said of the New York Times’s film critic: “I want to kill him. I want his intestines on a stick. I want to kill his dog.” 

But in an interview with members of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, he said: “In a way, it’s been interesting because it’s forced me to come to grips with one of the basic virtue I’m supposed to exercise here on earth, which is tolerance. I could have gotten nasty and climbed into the gutter to get into a clawing match with some of these guys. But that’s not what I’m supposed to do.”

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mel_Gibson#Alcohol_abuse_and_legal_issues

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 Gibson climaxed with the words, “Fucking Jews… the Jews are responsible for all the wars in the world.”

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