Here’s the power of hospitality—this willingness to go out of our way to invite and welcome and include those who formerly felt themselves to be on the outside looking in, creating holy space where those who formerly felt themselves to be alienated and alone might now enter into community with us. It is a ministry of presence. Henri Nouwen puts it this way: “Ministry is the spiritual act of seeing and helping others see the face of a loving God even when nothing but darkness seems to be present.” For Zacchaeus, it was the darkness of isolation, living amidst a community, yet clearly separated from it, treated as both outcast and hated enemy. For some among us, it may be the darkness that comes from living with a veil over us, from living with the unspoken reality of an abusive relationship, or a crippling addiction, or the fear of being upfront about one’s sexual orientation. For others among us, it may be the darkness of grief, sorrow, uncertainty, pain. For still others, it may be the fear of rejection, the fear of moving forth in new directions, the fear that we will never experience greater fulfillment than now. — J.D. Kline

 

 

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http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+love+god+with+all+your+heart&qpvt=images+love+god+with+all+your+heart&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=36FAB903D4569AFD1734F04DDAE92F40285E045A&selectedIndex=28

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+love+god+with+all+your+heart&qpvt=images+love+god+with+all+your+heart&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=DF3CF8C47C70C9FD872FDAA2717E446A158E289E&selectedIndex=58

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+love+god+with+all+your+heart&qpvt=images+love+god+with+all+your+heart&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=0993BA18BB9330E07010116BC73002C36DD7C606&selectedIndex=79

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+love+god+with+all+your+heart&qpvt=images+love+god+with+all+your+heart&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=489D22EC98FF68139FF647EEF1DD716A964C522C&selectedIndex=103

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+love+god+with+all+your+heart&qpvt=images+love+god+with+all+your+heart&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=D91CB5ED11B22805C6A7CE5BAE1A0AC952CECFE3&selectedIndex=95

 

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http://wptest.zgraphicsdev.com/archive/88

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Extending The Welcome—Comfort Or Scandal?

Luke 19:1-10

In her book Christianity for the Rest of Us, Diana Butler Bass seeks to explode the myth that the only growing churches in America today are mega-churches or those who embrace a rigidly evangelical perspective. Butler Bass examines church life in a number of mainline Protestant congregations that are exhibiting significant vitality and growth, and she highlights critical qualities of the spiritual life displayed in their congregational life. First on her list is hospitality.

Hospitality may well conjure up images of little more than a series of social graces performed with the intention of convincing persons to consider church membership. But the kind of hospitality displayed by lively congregations is not simply a recruitment strategy; it is a way of life. It is seeking to welcome others as graciously we ourselves have been welcomed into the fullness of God’s love through encounter with Jesus. Welcome one another, asserts the apostle Paul, just as Christ welcomed you (Romans 15:7). In his book Reaching Out Henri Nouwen defines hospitality as a matter of creating space where a stranger can enter and become a friend instead of an enemy. The space created is holy space, and it is offered, not with the intent of compelling the stranger to change so that he or she meets our criteria, but rather, it is a matter of offering a place where transforming encounter with God’s grace might occur.

The familiar story of Jesus encountering Zacchaeus serves as a model of hospitality. In Luke’s Gospel the story falls near the end of Jesus’ lengthy journey toward Jerusalem. Were Jesus primarily interested in making good time as he journeyed from Galilee to Jerusalem, he certainly would not have detoured through Jericho, especially since the road from Jericho to Jerusalem involves a steep, winding, and challenging ascent. But Jesus does indeed go out of his way, and while in Jericho he goes out of his way yet another time, as he reaches out to the despised tax collector who has climbed a sycamore tree, the better to catch sight of Jesus.

 

Tax collectors in ancient Palestine, you may recall, were viewed as the lowest of the low, traitorous and generally corrupt agents of the oppressive Romans. As chief tax collector, Zacchaeus likely was both extremely wealthy and extremely corrupt, by virtue of his position free to keep a portion of the money collected by all the subordinate tax officials in the entire Jericho region. But reading between the lines, one senses that all of Zacchaeus’ money provides precious little satisfaction. Was it mere curiosity that prompted Zacchaeus to seek to catch a glimpse of Jesus, or was there perhaps, deep within him, an unnamed yearning for something more in life? Indeed, was it not an act of considerable risk for Zacchaeus to venture, alone and unprotected, into a crowd that could easily recognize him as hated agent of the Romans?

New Testament scholar William Barclay suggests that many in the anonymity of the crowd would not hesitate to nudge or push or even kick Zacchaeus, so that by the time he climbs the tree, he may well have been black and blue with bruises. Not just because he is short of stature does Zacchaeus scale the tree, but even more, Zacchaeus is seeking a safe and guarded place. Yet once there, is not the hated tax collector even more vulnerable? Consider what could happen, should an angry victim catch sight of Zacchaeus up in the tree, and with a howl of delight turn the excitable crowd upon him with vengeance. Indeed, it may well have been the taunts of the crowd that initially draws the attention of Jesus to Zacchaeus in the tree.

For this reason and more, it is an intriguing story. Truth be told, it is a rather surprising story to be found in Luke’s Gospel, for seldom do the wealthy fare well, according to Luke’s remembrance of Jesus’ ministry. “Woe to you who are rich,” Jesus cries out in the Sermon on the Plain (6:24). And then there’s the parable in which Jesus labels a rich farmer a fool because the farmer can think of nothing but his own personal gain. Yet another parable portrays a rich man who dies and goes to Hades, while Lazarus, the poor beggar who long sat unnoticed at the rich man’s gate, is carried to the bosom of Abraham. In Mary’s joyful song, proclaimed in anticipation of her giving birth to Jesus, God is celebrated for “bring[ing] down the powerful from their thrones, and lift[ing] the lowly; [God] has filled the hungry with good things, and sent the rich away empty” (1:52-53). And after watching the rich young ruler turn away sorrowfully, Jesus observes, “How hard it is for those who have wealth to enter the kingdom of heaven!” (18:24).

Nevertheless, Jesus reaches out to Zacchaeus. There are no harsh words of judgment or recrimination, no badgering demand that Zacchaeus reform, no rigidly defined requirements for Zacchaeus to accept, before Jesus is willing to spend time with him. Rather, Jesus simply invites himself to the tax collector’s home, an action that both shocks and appalls the watching crowd. “He has gone to be the guest of one who is a sinner,” grumbles and laments the crowd (19:7)—and not just any sinner, but a chief among sinners! Jesus, however, displays little interest in creating greater distance in relationship, little desire to hold another at arm’s distance. Indeed, all throughout his ministry, Jesus does the very opposite; again and again Jesus shows himself to be in the business of enlarging God’s realm. In a world far more accustomed to creating barriers, Jesus offers gracious and transforming hospitality. In a world of judgment and division, Jesus models radical acceptance and inclusion.

Zacchaeus is so touched by this unexpected grace and compassion, by this unmerited acceptance, that his life is literally turned upside down. Recognizing just how far Jesus has gone out of his way to include him, Zacchaeus is overcome, so much so that he vows to move in markedly new directions in life; Zacchaeus determines to transform long-held priorities. The old ways of self-centeredness, greed and isolation will simply no longer do. And so the tax collector announces, “Look, half of my possessions, Lord, I will give to the poor; and if I have defrauded anyone of anything, I will pay back four times as much” (19:8).

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Clarence Jordan, noted for his founding of the interracial Koinonia community in Americus, Georgia back in the 1940s, once observed the powerful link between incarnation—God taking flesh in us and among us—and evangelism, inviting and welcoming others into the faith. Indeed, Jordan once wrote that we do not have “a right to bear witness to that which we do not experience.” Hospitality, then, is a two-way street. The one who extends hospitality finds his or her own faith experiences deepened and enriched. The Catholic writer and activist Joan Chittister once asserted, “Hospitality means we take people into the space that is our lives and our minds and our hearts and our work and our efforts. Hospitality is the way we come out of ourselves.” Along the way, we discover that the distinction between host and guest, between resident and stranger—this distinction becomes blurred.

Stanley Hauerwas and William Willimon tell a powerful story in their book Resident Aliens of a woman who was assaulted in her own backyard in the middle of the day. The woman’s pastor urged her to undergo therapy, as one means for dealing with the deep trauma caused by the attack. Some weeks into the therapy the woman’s counselor suggested that she tell someone other than her immediate family and her pastor about the experience. “Who are thinking you would like to tell?” asked her pastor, when she talked about the therapist’s suggestion. Responded the woman, “I think I would like to tell Sam Smith,” a sometimes recovering alcoholic in the congregation. The pastor was a bit taken aback because he assumed she would prefer telling another woman, or at least a man who was a bit more “together” than Sam. But when he asked, “Why Sam?” the woman responded, “Because Sam has been to hell and back. I think he will know what it has felt like for me to go there. Perhaps he can tell me how to get back.”

Sometimes hospitality—inviting others into our lives, into our fears every bit as much as our faith, into our horrors as well as our hopes—sometimes this kind of hospitality can appear scandalous. Yet this kind of hospitality and welcome demands courage, honesty, and spiritual openness. This kind of hospitality requires strength, not weakness. Lutheran writer and theologian Martin Marty once observed,

In a world where strangers meet strangers with gunfire, barrier walls, spiritually landmined paths, the spirit of revenge, and the record of intransigence, it sounds almost dainty to come on the scene and urge that hospitality has a strong and promising place.

Dainty though it may at first sound, hospitality is a key quality of the spiritual life. Congregations that display vitality and life are congregations willing to risk the scandal of hospitality—inviting and welcoming even those who live on the edge of society, those who may well have been to hell and back, those who are hoping beyond hope for a taste of compassion, community, and peace. To the surrounding crowds, Jesus’ inviting welcome to Zacchaeus appeared scandalous, but for Zacchaeus, it was an invitation that carried with it the promise of a new hope, a new comfort, a new way of living. Zacchaeus received the gracious words of invitation as words of freedom and new life.

May the same be true for us. May we find the courage and strength to embrace and offer the gift of hospitality.

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/04/09/my-wish-for-christian-keenan-1-corinthians-1510-filled-with-grace-within/

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http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=biblical+Paul+new+creation&qpvt=biblical+Paul+new+creation&FORM=IGRE&&id=C5379FB4CAFBCDFD7999EEF48A6AA3F2C3C297D7&selectedIndex=1#view=detail&id=C5379FB4CAFBCDFD7999EEF48A6AA3F2C3C297D7&selectedIndex=0

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Asking For Help

Mindfulness Benefits

Dreaming

Free Your Mind

Morning Mindfulness Practice

Emotional Health

Tibeten Buddhism

Meditation Tips

Christies In China

Uyuni Salt Flats

Life After Life Kate Atkinson

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When you know that a Christian is dead inside (e.g. needlessly suffering by being angry with the world),  then it’s time for Biblical Paul’s recitation on inner Grace – being regenerated, called, sanctified  —

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a new creation, baby!!   

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The heretofore unsearchable/unreachable solace of Christ

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Grace gives us the desire and the power from God to do His will  —

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to give life a chance, baby!!

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  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Divine_grace#Christianity

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2012/07/04/i-ask-myself-to-make-it-to-tomorrow-for-life-to-start-anew-i-need-to-move-beyond-todays-loss/

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http://bible.cc/1_corinthians/15-10.htm

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Rhema (inner voice) [pronounced “ray-ma”]  & life application  –

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/02/12/thriving-learning-having-wisdom-are-about-getting-up-each-morning-with-intention-clarity-commitment-to-seek-nurture-connection-along-lifes-healthy-healing-path-of-inner-nouris/

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http://blog.chron.com/lutherant/2012/11/global-child-poverty-changing-the-story/

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When it comes to helping people in need, one of the stories that should spark our imagination remains Jesus’ parable of the good Samaritan

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The aspect of the parable I would point out here is its personal nature [very specific]

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To demonstrate how (and to whom) we ought to show compassion

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Jesus does not speak in generalities. 

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He gives a specific situation,

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where one individual (the Samaritan) must make a decision about how

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to treat another specific individual (the Jew set upon by robbers). 

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Christian mercy is not about generalized theories,

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but about specifics.

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Since Jesus lived in an oral culture,

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scholars expect that short, memorable stories or phrases

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as applications of Scripture

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are from Jesus.    

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For example, “love your enemies.”   

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesus_Seminar#Criteria_for_authenticity

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Turning common-sense ideas upside down, confounding the expectations of His audience:

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He/Jesus preached of “Heaven’s imperial rule” [traditionally translated as “Kingdom of God“]

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as being already present but unseen;

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He depicts God as a loving father;

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He squares shoulders with outsiders

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and criticizes insiders.  

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Christ evokes not simply an apocalyptic eschatology/end-time,

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but more critically a sapiential eschatology,

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which encourages all of God’s children to repair the world  NOW.

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Not just the Parables but the Beatitudes/etc. feature the

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dramatic presentation and reversal of expectations that are characteristic of Jesus.

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Based on several important narrative parables [such as the Parable of the Good Samaritan],

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scholars decided that irony, reversal, and frustration of expectations were characteristic of Christ’s style.  

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Does a pericope/concise passage illustrate opposites or impossibilities? 

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If it does, it’s more likely to be authentic.

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One-third of the Bible consists of Parables/Pericopes/aphorisms.

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The poor are accepted as constituting the primary recipients of the Good News and, therefore,

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as having an inherent capacity of understanding it better than anyone else.    

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/rev-james-martin-sj/glenn-beck-vs-christ-the-_b_698359.html

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That’s pretty threatening for any comfortable Christian.

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For not only do we have to help the poor, not only do we have to advocate on their behalf, we also have to see them as understanding God better than we do!

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But that’s not a new idea:

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It goes back to Jesus.

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The poor, the sick and the outcast “got” Him better than the wealthy did.

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Perhaps because there was less standing between the poor and God.

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Less stuff [pride].

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Maybe that’s why Jesus said in the Gospel of Matthew, “You will have treasure in heaven, and follow me.”

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See also Galatians 6:2  –  lovingly take on one another’s burden  — mutual help

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/04/12/sage-don-milam-his-powers-of-persuasion-were-honed-by-his-ability-to-see-beyond-the-ordinary-he-loved-the-story-method-of-getting-his-point-across-everyone-loves-a-good-story-and-jesus-could-tel/

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Sage Don Milam:   His powers of persuasion were honed by His ability to see beyond the ordinary. He loved the story method of getting His point across. Everyone loves a good story, and Jesus could tell a good story. He liked to end His stories with a twist that left the hearers walking away scratching their heads and thinking about them for many hours to come. The aphorisms and parables of Jesus function in a particular way: they are invitational forms of speech. Jesus used them to invite his hearers to see something they might not otherwise see. As evocative forms of speech, they tease the imagination into activity, suggest more than they say, and invite a transformation in perception. Drawing pictures from their own familiar world, He arrested their minds, captured their imaginations, and opened them ever so gently to the stirrings of the ancient language deep within them. Jesus liked to put His listeners in almost every story He told, and by the way, you and I were there as well—the least, the last, the little and the lost. These were the objects of His loving attention in those stories He told.

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/04/12/in-the-case-of-christ-we-have-a-unique-form-of-persuasion-it-is-like-what-happens-when-an-error-in-our-viewpoint-is-shown-to-us-and-our-mind-reassembles-around-the-truth-that-we-have-not-seen-but-i/

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In the case of Christ we have a unique form of persuasion. It is like what happens when an error in our viewpoint is shown to us, and our mind reassembles around the truth that we have not seen. But it is unlike this process in that the truth that takes us over is not a correct proposition but a person. (Sebastian Moore)   — sage Don Milam

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/04/12/jesus-violated-every-conceivable-tradition-when-it-came-to-his-associations-with-the-marginalized-of-jewish-society-he-infuriated-the-pharisees-with-every-compassionate-touch-the-qumran-community-of/

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Jesus violated every conceivable tradition when it came to His associations with the marginalized of Jewish society. He infuriated the Pharisees with every compassionate touch. The Qumran community of the Essenes had an unconditional law: “No madman, or lunatic, or simpleton, or fool, no blind man, or maimed, or lame, or deaf man, and no minor shall enter the community. “Jesus came to shatter these man-made laws with the vengeance of Heaven. It was these very rejected ones whom He had come to save. To the Pharisees He declared, ‘But go and learn what this means, “I desire compassion, and not sacrifice,” for I did not come to call the righteous, but sinners.’ The Pharisees surrounded themselves with the rich, the wise, the educated, and the elite of society. Jesus, conversely, surrounded Himself with the poor, the uneducated, the rejected, and the outcasts of society.”   — sage Don Milam

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhema#Modern_usage 

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Rhema is the revealed word of God (revelation received from the Holy Spirit) when the Word/Logos is read, as an

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application/utterance/”unction”/anointment from God to the heart of the reader via the Holy Spirit, as in John 14:26    

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Again, application of Scripture to this world.

“… the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in my name, will teach you all things and will remind you of everything I have said to you.”

In this usage Rhema refers to “a word that is spoken,” when the Holy Spirit delivers a message to the heart as in Romans 10:17:

“Consequently, faith comes from hearing the message, and the message is heard through the word of Christ. (rhematos Christou)”

and in the Matthew 4:4:

“Man does not live on bread alone, but on every word (rhema) that comes from the mouth of God”.

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Remarkable that one’s experiences span a century or more, if one is lucky enough to live into old age.       My uncle Masaaki 1903-1970 was 50 years older than me.    My grandson Silas is 50 years younger than me.    Uncle Masaaki is a century older than Silas.     My life experiences span a century between Uncle Masaaki and my grandson Silas.    Gatz!    Defy Father Time??

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Of course, one can stretch even longer life’s time span   –   my grandma [Uncle Masaaki’s & my dad’s mama] Tome was 70 years older than me.     I’m just short of age 60, so my lifeblood youngest progeny is my youngest grandchild, my granddaughter Maya, who is 59 years younger than me.     Not equidistant, but 130 years separate my grandma Tome from my granddaughter Maya.     

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Actor William Demarest 1892-1983 was 60 years older than me, thus meeting the equidistance measure, with my granddaughter Maya being 60 years younger than me — the total span being 120 years from William Demarest [or my uncle Bill Cappy Chun, also born in Demarest’s time] to my granddaughter Maya.      Here is prolific vaudeville/longtime character actor Demarest  –

William Demarest Picture

William Demarest(1892–1983)


Born in St. Paul, Minnesota, William Demarest was a prolific actor in movies and TV, making more than 140 films. Demarest started his acting career in vaudeville and made his way to Broadway. His most famous role was in My Three Sons, replacing a very sick William Frawley. Demarest was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actor in a Supporting role in the real-life biography…See full bio »

Died:

December 28,     1983         (age 91) in        Palm Springs, California, USA

Still of Humphrey Bogart and William Demarest in All Through the NightStill of Humphrey Bogart, Peter Lorre and William Demarest in All Through the Night
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Of course, this year’s 60th year Diamond Jubilee with majestic Queen Elizabeth had the most amazing aerial displays    –
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but let’s also  remember lusty [yes, con todo mi alma y corazon] Victoria‘s Diamond Jubilee in 1897 [my grandparents were hormonal teens bent on pioneering East to the Hawaiian islands of silk & honey][Victoria is current Queen Elizabeth’s great great grandmother][our greatest modern Hawaiian statesperson Pi’ehu Iaukea 1855-1940 pilgrimaged to England for this tremendous occasion — Pi’ehu was preceded in great diplomacy & leadership by Kamehameha III Kauikeaouli 1813-1854]

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Thence, my immigrant grandparents’ odyssey East transcended both Victoria’s & current Queen Elizabeth’s reigns –   my ojisans/obasans [tutus] experienced both divine queens in all their soulful reigns   – 115 years  [Victoria in 1897 & Elizabeth’s 2012 jubilee] spanning 3 centuries [1800s to 2000s]!!!    Wow!!

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I was 20 when my daughter was born, 40 when my oldest grandchild/mo’opuna kane was born, 50 when my middle grandson was born [among 5 grandchildren, 3 boys, 2 girls], and nearly 60 when my youngest grandchild/mo’opuna wahine was born.    

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My parents whom I worship and miss dearly were 40 years older than me.    My mature parents were tutus/grandparents to me in age chronology, & I am blessed by their mature wisdom/magnanimity & composure/equanimity.  

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My parents died 15 years ago 4 months apart [coincidence  — Mom died of a stroke/Dad died 4 months later from cancer].

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I felt like a grandchild blessed with the most loving & supportive tutus/grandparents in the world, though when I was a barefoot plantation toddler here in Wainaku [Ha’aheo Elem. School atop Kamehameha the Great’s most beautiful pu’u/hilltop]  — I felt terribly embarassed that my parents were fuddy-duddy oldsters vs. my village kid peers’ parents, and that my mom worked, so that I never came home to a homemaker mom who had cookies laid out for me on the kitchen table in our old plantation mill camp.    

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When my parents died 15 years ago, I suddenly crossed over to be a tutu/grandparent to my burgeoning mo’opuna/grandkids.     My grandparents 70 years older than me had died by the time I was born.

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I don’t remember being a child [in a most blessed sense], but undeniably I was blessed/gifted [of the spirits?  Cor./Romans/Ephesians/Peter/etc.] as a grandchild would be, with my dearest parents who were like grandparents to me in wisdom/countenance.    

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Nor do I remember being a parent [my daughter who is approaching middle age at 40  — laughingly tells me that I was a lousy party animal parent but above all else  — I loved my daughter more than anything/anyone in the whole wide world  — and this is the only thing which counted for my daughter, which is/means everything to her & to me!!].    

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But now here I am as a grandparent [by default  — ha ha  ha — still a party animal], and wow, time flies, baby! !!

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And now I am by default/pied piper via hedonism/elan tutu again to 2 dearest “hanai”/emotional attachment — mo’opuna  — Colton age 27 & Jill age 22, grandkids to me in age chronology!   I ask Colton how may I be of service to him/Jill, & Colton shoots back, “Don’t!   Just be you!”    Gatz!   Who am I????   [ha ha    ;-)    ]   

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Foggy bottom, baby   — is my head — spinning like a top???!!    Ha ha!   Dig my hero George Harrison’s video   –   [40 years from age 20 to 60 for me  — go by in the blink of an eye!!][Maui resident Harrison died of cancer at age 58 after 9/11 & a year after this You Tube video was produced] 

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Yes, I hope to make it to age 80 & still feel like a passionate teenager in love!!   Ha ha ha!!        Enjoy [the treats below], baby!!!

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Age is a   figment of our imagination    — our core being is   ageless!       –

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See especially timeclock 4:19 to 5:05 of youtube below about Harrison’s opinion on aging as soulfully deepest youth enjoyed  –

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0uVnKjv4fK0&feature=related

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Music is my whole life, and I dedicate these happy links to my Dad Toshi 1913-1998, who was born to sing & play his ubiquitous Martin ‘ukulele, and who sang & played in the mango tree astride my grandparents’ Wainaku mill camp home as a young boy.     Dad’s mom Tome 1881-1954 sang & picked at her samisen Japanese fiddle/string board.   Dad got his music from his mom Tome.  Dad/I are baritones, my baby brother Lloyd & Dad’s youngest sibling Charley are fine tenors.   My Mom  (maiden name Hanato of Kona) never sang.   I think our musical DNA is from my Dad’s side of the family.

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Even into Dad’s final years, Dad would sing among our backyard pals, Dad’s Martin ‘ukulele always in his arms. My daughter Staycie age 40 is half Hawaiian, & my dearest little baby girl Staycie has instilled in her children the spirit of the islands — aloha — welcome/accomodation/tenderness/humbleness/kindness/generosity — her children  Maya age 2/Emily age 6/Silas & Ashley both age 11/Shay age 21. Beautiful aloha. My mo’opuna keiki all.

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3D-SgA_NJwk

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f29uA3gwhbc

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As a child just after Statehood 54 yrs. ago, I was enthralled by the theme song to CBS local affiliate’s Saturday Island matinee playhouse.   I still have not pinned down its title, but I remember it sounding a little like Glen Miller’s Moonlight Serenade.   Music aficionados “in the know” are long dead & gone [the great George Camarillo/Gloriana Adap/etc.], so I’ll have to sleuth a little more to find out the melodic magic of half a century ago.   Nonetheless, I present to you favorites of mine over the years.   Enjoy    ;-)

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Beautiful Pachelbel’s Canon, lost to history for centuries

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Af372EQLck

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/01/03/writing-and-eventually-dying-a-good-death-expressing-sharing-love-to-the-end/

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2012/12/21/i-write-to-live-authentically-having-been-is-the-surest-kind-of-being-per-great-sage-viktor-frankl/

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2012/11/17/all-those-moments-of-life-will-be-lost-in-time-like-tears-in-the-rain-time-to-for-me-time-to-deal-with-myself-alone/

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2012/11/24/sharing-grief-puts-a-healing-distance-between-us-and-the-pain-this-is-why-storytelling-matters/

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/02/20/ambivalence-killed-jesus-the-people-waved-palm-branches-on-sunday-singing-hosanna-hey-come-friday-they-shouted-to-free-barabbas-same-crowd-when-you-stand-too-close-to-beautiful/

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/01/10/acknowledging-ambivalence-is-best-way-to-cope-sage-steven-kalas/

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2012/12/27/i-will-die-a-good-death/

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2012/12/14/because-in-the-end-great-journeys-of-integrity-are-walked-alone-sage-steven-kalas/

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/01/16/does-your-life-have-purpose/

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/01/04/randy-pausch-steven-kalas-living-meaningfully/

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/01/17/harriet-beecher-stowes-prophetic-engine-sage-joan-d-hedrick/

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