Do what matters

 

 

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dedicated to the memory of Albert Pacheco of Pua Lane Wainaku Hawai’i

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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/rev-peg-nowling-williams/theres-healing-and-theres_b_3146173.html

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This past Sunday, our Scripture, Acts 9:36-43, told us about Tabitha, a disciple of Jesus. Tabitha, probably the first woman called a disciple, was a beautiful woman, I’m sure.  She likely died too young for the life expectancy of women in her day was 40 years old. 

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However, Tabitha was only part of this story.  The big part of the story was the community that loved her.  The women who shared stories about her; showed the tunics Tabitha had made.  I bet people even brought food — ham, fried chicken, cakes and cookies — high calorie comfort food.  Together they mourned and when Peter came and brought her back to life, they rejoiced!

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I begin to heal when someone sits next to me letting me know he/she cares.  Ken says the best visit he received after his late wife died was from his theology professor from seminary.  His professor and now friend came over, sat down and listened.  He didn’t tell his own stories; he simply listened to Ken.

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We can heal when we move outside our own grief and reach out to others; when our motivation is to help others in their own healing.

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We don’t heal when we seek revenge.  We don’t heal when we can’t forgive.  We don’t heal when anger is the largest emotion we have.  Healing comes out of letting our grief be real, but not letting it consume us.

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As I read the stories of the events that surrounded the bombing in Boston I shed more than a few tears.  People like Dr. Natalie Stavas, a pediatric resident at Boston Children’s Hospital, who was near the home stretch of the race she was running when she heard the blasts. Despite having run 26 miles, she went over barriers and past policemen, until one stopped her. Stavas later told CNN she told him she was a doctor and pleaded, “You have to let me help, you have to let me through.” She performed CPR on the first person she encountered, and for the next two, she worked to halt their bleeding. And hundreds of others, she said, were doing the same. 

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Natalie Stavas did what mattered.  She stood up when she saw the need. 

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PBS’ Mr. Rogers told us that a long time ago:  “When I was a boy and I would see scary things in the news, my mother would say to me, ‘Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping.’

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To this day, especially in times of disaster, I remember my mother’s words and I am always comforted by realizing that there are still so many helpers — so many caring people in the world.”

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There’s healing and there’s healing.

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Tabitha was healed from death to live again.  The community was healed to continue its walk in faith. 

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Healing in Boston is coming in many ways.  Certainly knowing that the remaining suspected bomber have been found has been critical, but it hasn’t been the only way. 

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One way the people of Boston are healing is in solidarity, as in when they joined together singing the National Anthem at the Bruins-Sabres hockey game.  They healed a little more when they gathered at Fenway Park last Saturday singing “Sweet Caroline” with Neil Diamond.  They continued the healing when they stopped for a moment of silence on Monday at 2:50 p.m., a week after the bombing.

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We heal when we aren’t afraid of each other.  We heal when we reach out to others.

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