Homer Simpson is in many ways — an “everyman” — flawed, self-inflated, crude — “every age needs its great, consoling failure, its lovable, pretension-free mediocrity. And we have ours in Homer Simpson.”

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http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+everyman&qpvt=images+everyman&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=3677146AE2D8B98D8202523C4F511F27D5BCD473&selectedIndex=98

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The thistle   —  Homer Simpson:  prickly defiant determination when confronted by danger

Earth Day Gps Guide
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Meditation
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homer_Simpson#Analysis

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Analysis

Homer Simpson is an “everyman” and embodies several American stereotypes of working class blue-collar men: he is crude, overweight, incompetent, clumsy and a borderline alcoholic.

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Matt Groening describes him as “completely ruled by his impulses.” Dan Castellaneta says “he’s incredibly loyal – not entirely clean – but you gotta love him.”

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In his book Planet Simpson, author Chris Turner describes Homer as “the most American of the Simpsons” and believes that while the other Simpson family members could be changed to other nationalities, Homer is “pure American.”

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In the book God in the Details: American Religion in Popular Culture, the authors comment that “Homer’s progress (or lack thereof) reveals a character who can do the right thing, if accidentally or begrudgingly.”

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The book The Simpsons and Philosophy: The D’oh! of Homer includes a chapter analyzing Homer’s character from the perspective of Aristotelian virtue ethics. Raja Halwani writes that Homer’s “love of life” is an admirable character trait —   “for many people are tempted to see in Homer nothing but buffoonery and immorality. […] He is not politically correct, he is more than happy to judge others, and he certainly does not seem to be obsessed with his health. These qualities might not make Homer an admirable person, but they do make him admirable in some ways, and, more importantly, makes us crave him and the Homer Simpsons of this world.”

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In 2008, Entertainment Weekly justified designating The Simpsons as a television classic by stating, “we all hail Simpson patriarch Homer because his joy is as palpable as his stupidity is stunning.”

In the season eight episode “Homer’s Enemy” the writers decided to examine “what it would be like to actually work alongside Homer Simpson.”  The episode explores the possibilities of a realistic character with a strong work ethic named Frank Grimes placed alongside Homer in a work environment. In the episode, Homer is portrayed as an everyman and the embodiment of the American spirit; however, in some scenes his negative characteristics and silliness are prominently highlighted.

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By the end of the episode, Grimes, a hard working and persevering “real American hero,”  is relegated to the role of antagonist; the viewer is intended to be pleased that Homer has emerged victorious.

In Gilligan Unbound, author Paul Arthur Cantor states that he believes Homer’s devotion to his family has added to the popularity of the character. He writes, “Homer is the distillation of pure fatherhood. […] This is why, for all his stupidity, bigotry and self-centered quality, we cannot hate Homer. He continually fails at being a good father, but he never gives up trying, and in some basic and important sense that makes him a good father.”    The Sunday Times remarked “Homer is good because, above all, he is capable of great love. When the chips are down, he always does the right thing by his children—he is never unfaithful in spite of several opportunities.”

Cultural influence

Homer Simpson is one of the most popular and influential television characters in a variety of standards. USA Today cited the character as being one of the “top 25 most influential people of the past 25 years” in 2007, adding that Homer “epitomized the irony and irreverence at the core of American humor.”    Robert Thompson, director of Syracuse University‘s Center for the Study of Popular Television believes that “three centuries from now, English professors are going to be regarding Homer Simpson as one of the greatest creations in human storytelling.”    Animation historian Jerry Beck described Homer as one of the best animated characters, saying, “you know someone like it, or you identify with (it). That’s really the key to a classic character.”    Homer has been described by The Sunday Times as “the greatest comic creation of [modern] time”. The article remarked, “every age needs its great, consoling failure, its lovable, pretension-free mediocrity. And we have ours in Homer Simpson.”

Homer has been cited as a bad influence on children; for example, in 2005 a survey conducted in the United Kingdom found that 59% of parents felt that Homer promoted an unhealthy lifestyle.   A five-year study of more than 2,000 middle-aged people in France found a possible link between weight and brain function, the findings of which were dubbed the “Homer Simpson syndrome.”   Results from a word memory test showed that people with a Body mass index (BMI) of 20 (considered to be a healthy level) remembered an average of nine out of 16 words. Meanwhile, people with a BMI of 30 (inside the obese range) remembered an average of just seven out of 16 words.

Despite Homer’s embodiment of American culture, his influence has spread to other parts of the world. In 2003, Matt Groening revealed that his father, after whom Homer was named, was Canadian, and said that this made Homer himself a Canadian.   The character was later made an honorary citizen of Winnipeg, Canada, in real life because Homer Groening was believed to be from the Manitoba capital, although sources say the senior Groening was actually born in Saskatchewan.    In 2007, an image of Homer was painted next to the Cerne Abbas Giant in Dorset, England as part of a promotion for The Simpsons Movie. This caused outrage among local neopagans who performed “rain magic” to try to get it washed away.    In 2008, a fake Spanish euro coin was found in Avilés, Spain, with the face of Homer replacing the figure of King Juan Carlos I.    On April 9, 2009, the United States Postal Service unveiled a series of five 44 cent stamps featuring Homer and the four other members of the Simpson family. They are the first characters from a television series to receive this recognition while the show is still in production.    The stamps, designed by Matt Groening, were made available for purchase on May 7, 2009.

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