And literally for God’s sake, can someone turn off Pat Robertson’s microphone as soon as possible?! His version of Christianity is a far cry from what the vast majority of other Christians aspire to follow. I don’t think Jesus told us to throw our neighbors under the bus like Pat wants us to believe. Jesus instead said to love them unconditionally. — Kyle Anderson

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http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+seeking+happiness&qpvt=images+seeking+happiness&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=68B557BDAFFF56E787F1B548FCF42BCAAA200F6B&selectedIndex=41

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http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+seeking+happiness&qpvt=images+seeking+happiness&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=116C3B66676908FB143AEE211B15005CB05B62F7&selectedIndex=46

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http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+seeking+happiness&qpvt=images+seeking+happiness&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=D77A6BF5189C84E9589169DFD45F0DD74457E07D&selectedIndex=69

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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/kyle-anderson/pat-robertson-misses-the-part-about-loving-his-neighbors-again_b_3240461.html

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Pat Robertson Again Misses the Part About Loving His Neighbors

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Perhaps picking on Pat Robertson is not the most productive use of time; he has proven again and again and again that he is extremely intolerant and not the best ambassador for interfaith understanding (understatement of the year) and a Christian love that I am sure Jesus would look to promote were he alive today. While it is easy to dismiss Pat for just being Pat, the reality is that he has a microphone (remember, he ran for President in the late 1980s?) through his television program, the 700 Club, which many people hear and take seriously. Voices like Robertson’s need to be called out for adding nothing but hateful rhetoric and divisiveness into conversations about religion in society today.

Robertson has implied and directly connected the actions of the Boston marathon bombers with having a radical agenda rooted in the Islamic faith. When people say things like this, I cannot help but yearn to go to nearest mountaintop and yell, “the two men involved in the Boston Marathon bombings are nothing more than murderous thugs. Regardless of their motivations, inspirations, and beliefs, their actions are THEIR OWN and DO NOT REPRESENT AN ENTIRE FAITH TRADITION!”

When acts of terrorism are committed involving “dark skinned men” (terminology that CNN correspondent John King was so quick to throw out there while initially reporting on the tragedy as the news began to break) — why do so many minds make the connection between Muslims and terrorism?  I get why it happens, but do not get why it KEEPS happening. It is becoming an unfortunately predictable reaction following tragedies like what happened in Boston (the Onion does a good job of capturing this in a recent satire article).

When a “light-skinned person” commits a crime, most people’s first thoughts are likely not “oh gee, there goes another Christian citing God for justification of the killing spree he or she went on.” Without a doubt, people have cited the Bible to justify terrible atrocities throughout history, but I feel safe in saying that is not where the minds of most go when they first hear about crimes committed by Christians.

Did it enter Robertson’s mind for one second that maybe the bombers were perhaps not motivated by religion at all when carrying out their actions? It appears that some people need to be able to rationalize unexplainable acts of terror. Putting the bombers into a box of the “typical religious extremist” is the easy way out and is affirmed on television by individuals like Pat Robertson; this does not have to be our default position though.

In a busy world of 24 hour news, every network races to be the first to report the latest breaking story. Why not take a deep breath and get the story right instead of rushing to quick conclusions that may be exaggerated or completely false? Many people report that their knowledge of religious traditions outside their own come from what they hear through the media. The language news outlets choose can have profound effects on the views that people hold toward other religious and non-religious people.

And literally for God’s sake, can someone turn off Pat Robertson’s microphone as soon as possible?! His version of Christianity is a far cry from what the vast majority of other Christians aspire to follow. I don’t think Jesus told us to throw our neighbors under the bus like Pat wants us to believe. He said to love them unconditionally.

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/05/04/jesus-makes-clear-that-to-forgive-is-to-forget-propitiation-and-their-sins-and-iniquities-i-will-remember-no-more-hebrews-1017/

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Jesus makes clear that to forgive is to forget — propitiation.   “And their sins and iniquities I will remember no more.”    Hebrews 10:17

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http://www.google.com/search?q=images+forgiving+is+forgetting&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=znaFUdrJD8G4igK9hoGgDQ&ved=0CC0QsAQ&biw=1471&bih=801#imgrc=qz8QuBgOjBwulM%3A%3Bex4I8f80OYC0WM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252F4.bp.blogspot.com%252F-5tmjeVdICUQ%252FUU5vwcto_QI%252FAAAAAAAAD2Y%252FkuvnCfwd64c%252Fs1600%252F2.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.lifeiskulayful.net%252F2013%252F03%252Fon-forgiving-and-forgetting.html%3B1200%3B967

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http://www.google.com/search?q=images+forgiving+is+forgetting&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=ZXWFUZOsMcjPiwKC5YGwCQ&ved=0CC0QsAQ&biw=1471&bih=801#imgrc=ax6crAT55I8WxM%3A%3BfnzWWb4DpU2yaM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fimages.firstcovers.com%252Fcovers%252Fuserquotes%252Ff%252Fforgive_%2526_forget%252C-12734.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.firstcovers.com%252Fuserquotes%252F12734%252Fforgive%252B%2526%252Bforget%252C.html%3B850%3B315

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http://www.google.com/search?q=images+forgiving+is+forgetting&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=GHaFUbjyO4HViwLSpYDQAQ&ved=0CC0QsAQ&biw=1471&bih=801#imgrc=q4ihIivI-77b3M%3A%3BSwrd2OrqCOV13M%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Floopholesonlife.files.wordpress.com%252F2013%252F05%252Fgift-of-forgiveness.jpg%253Fw%253D584%2526h%253D442%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Floopholesonlife.com%252F%3B584%3B443

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http://www.google.com/search?q=images+forgiving+is+forgetting&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=NHeFUa-jHeXgiwK3kICYBQ&ved=0CC0QsAQ&biw=1471&bih=801#imgrc=I95kJlXp6MX71M%3A%3BbIWr9kYnX0jfHM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252F4.bp.blogspot.com%252F-JY1D7VhSrqM%252FUBNKiT0W4FI%252FAAAAAAAAASU%252FmHecqewtHjY%252Fs1600%252FForgive%252BAnd%252BForget.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fthe–question–why.blogspot.com%252F2012%252F07%252Fforgiveness-and-good-friends.html%3B500%3B334

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http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+forgiveness&qpvt=images+forgiveness&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=4FD6A13EA9EE3EB726BB0EDE22EA541285DC7301&selectedIndex=5

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http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+forgiveness&qpvt=images+forgiveness&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=24910724888DD8797461A18B77B5FC4BB40751A0&selectedIndex=1

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http://www.google.com/search?q=images+forgiving+is+forgetting&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=nXeFUYnGBsW-igLkwYHwDQ&ved=0CC0QsAQ&biw=1471&bih=801#imgrc=kpCuMdnvIjrGdM%3A%3B2Z4gJ2846bh-OM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fmyquoteshome.com%252Fwp-content%252Fuploads%252F2012%252F10%252Fquotes-about-relationships-02.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fmyquoteshome.com%252Fsometimes-we-need-to-forget-quotes-about-relationships%252F%3B450%3B350

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http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+forgiveness&qpvt=images+forgiveness&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=A72A3CEAC715C6718C09BC53764F15F59AD845FF&selectedIndex=19

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http://www.google.com/search?q=images+forgiving+is+forgetting&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=dXaFUe-6H8HgiwLBlYHgDQ&ved=0CC0QsAQ&biw=1471&bih=801#imgrc=Mz9UYw8Umx3yVM%3A%3BpCPnTK00sL5f5M%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fapi.ning.com%252Ffiles%252FDOB-NIL3hROkRA-6*74rf4kmK7Vh5TDnhvk9D-EHaY8RU7BRSD3VZ3igYJzd0lUnku1G5vdcebek2LUdIXHsAFVNxjrfP59Y%252Fgrudgerock.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fpositiveatmosphere.com%252Fprofiles%252Fblogs%252Fmore-powerful-than-forgiving-and-forgetting%3B310%3B311

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http://www.google.com/search?q=images+forgiving+is+forgetting&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=83SFUYmcJ8S4igLw1oDgDA&ved=0CC0QsAQ&biw=1471&bih=801#imgrc=sAOKZvA23MAXkM%3A%3B8b8Syl5MErOuiM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.orkugifs.com%252Fen%252Fimages%252Fforgiving-is-forgetting_1182.gif%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.orkugifs.com%252Fen%252Fgraphics-comments-forgiving%252Bis%252Bforgetting-gif-1182.html%3B396%3B252

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http://www.google.com/search?q=images+forgiving+is+forgetting&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=o3WFUejFMOv4igL1lYHwDw&ved=0CC0QsAQ&biw=1471&bih=801#imgrc=0vkeCLUv57ufZM%3A%3Bnr6AA83rgLtS7M%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fstatic.oprah.com%252Fimages%252Fspirit%252F201004%252F20100409-forget-and-forgive-300×205.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.oprah.com%252Fspirit%252F8-Ways-to-Forgive-and-Forget%3B300%3B205

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http://www.google.com/search?q=images+forgiving+is+forgetting&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=4XWFUcM04smJAt-cgdgJ&ved=0CC0QsAQ&biw=1471&bih=801#imgrc=HGevob2OYgBtSM%3A%3Bktp2wHRK0n9DLM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fb.vimeocdn.com%252Fts%252F399%252F483%252F399483349_640.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fvimeo.com%252F57604665%3B640%3B360

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http://www.google.com/search?q=images+forgiving+is+forgetting&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=6neFUarPBcKZiQK_3IA4&ved=0CC0QsAQ&biw=1471&bih=801#imgrc=zEsMSSn8prFOTM%3A%3BlihSyzMkRiaw4M%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fimages.suite101.com%252F3505323_com_happiness2.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fsuite101.com%252Farticle%252Fthe-formula-of-happiness-a395707%3B448%3B336

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http://www.giga-usa.com/quotes/authors/robert_leighton_a001.htm

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“God’s way of forgiving is thorough and hearty  -— both to forgive and to forget — and if thine be not so, thou hast no portion of His.”    –Robert Leighton

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Propitiation#Christian_theology

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Propitiation is translated from the Greek hilasterion, meaning “that which expiates or propitiates” or “the gift which procures propitiation.” 1 John 2:2 (KJV) And he is the propitiation for our sins: and not for ours only, but also for the sins of the whole world.” The word is also used in the New Testament for the place of propitiation, the “mercy seat.” Hebrews 9:5. There is frequent similar use of hilasterion in the Septuagint, Exodus 25:18 ff. The mercy seat was sprinkled with atoning blood on the Day of Atonement (Leviticus 16:14), representing that the righteous sentence of the Law had been executed, changing a judgment seat into a mercy seat (Hebrews 9:11-15; compare with “throne of grace” in Hebrews 4:14-16; place of communion, Exodus 25:21-22).

Another Greek word, hilasmos, is used for Christ as our propitiation. 1 John 2:2; 4:10, and for “atonement” in the septuagint (Leviticus 25:9). The thought in the Old Testament sacrifices and in the New Testament fulfillment, is that Christ completely satisfied the just demands of our Holy Father for judgment on sin, by his death on the Cross of Calvary.

God, in view of the cross, is declared righteous in having been able to justify sins in the Old Testament period, as well as in being able to forgive sinners under the New Covenant (Romans 3:25,26; cf. Exodus 29:33, note).

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Propitiation “does not make God gracious.  God does not love us because Christ died for us, Christ died for us because God loves us.”  (John Stott, The Cross of Christ, p 174).

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Within God there is a dichotomy of love and anger, but through propitiation love trumps anger, abolishing it. “‘The doctrine of the propitiation precisely is that God loved the objects of His wrath so much that He gave His own Son to the end that He by His blood should make provision for the removal of this wrath.”  (John Murray, The Atonement, p.15)

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Comprehending one’s adversary’s psyche is the first step to propitiation.  

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Such “understanding” can have a hint of irony [about our own brokenness/flaw]

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and many a paradoxes [about our own real truths, unlovely especially].

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Irony — the deepest revelation, not facile/surface impulse satire-sarcasm

[e.g.  Shakespeare’s Merchant of Venice’s anti-semitic  mocking laughter eventually gags of/on its own voluminous venom]

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Paradox — irresolvable truth

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Paradox can be irony,

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and irony can be paradox.

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Contradiction is not paradox.     Only one thing is true in contradiction, not both opposites being true.

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http://www.lvrj.com/blogs/kalas/Lennon_struggled_with_fame_even_as_he_looked_for_it.html

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John “apologized.” It was the worst apology ever: “Originally I had pointed out that fact in reference to England, that we meant more to kids than Jesus did, or religion at that time. I wasn’t knocking it or putting it down, I was just saying it. It was a fact. And it’s true more for England than (the United States). I’m not saying that we’re better or greater, or comparing us with Jesus Christ as a person, or God as a thing. I just said what I said and it was wrong, or it was taken wrong, and now it’s all this.”

You hear an apology in that? Me neither. It’s John’s contempt. What John said was a fact [a paradox — everything is true].

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Christianity at that time and place was not compelling the imaginations, hearts and minds of young people as The Beatles were. You have to go back to Palm Sunday, perhaps, to see a Jesusmania that rivals the Beatlemania of the mid-’60s.

Christians remember the Gospel story. Jesus’ triumphal entry into Jerusalem, a week before he was executed. He road a donkey into town, while the people sang and rejoiced [an irony — intended/surface meaning ergo humility — deepest meaning ergo rebukement vs. Rome & the elite pharisees].

The donkey often is thought of as an expression of Jesus’ utter humility.

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But I’m convinced it was yet another expression of Jesus’ favorite political ploy:  Irony.

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Yep. Jesus wasn’t orchestrating and basking in his fans’ adulation. He was satirizing the pretense of pompous Roman authority and particularly Pontius Pilate, who always thundered through the Jerusalem city gates on a decorated horse. [the deepest ontic/unction — irony — is to show up human folly for what it is — overpride/jealousy/greed/anger]

Jesus had contempt for pretense and hypocrisy.

Offended religious leaders complained to Jesus about the praising crowd, and implored him to tell them to be quiet. Jesus replied, “Well, I could tell them to be quiet, but then the rocks would just start singing.”

A boast? Hardly. Jesus was merely observing. When a group of people is caught up in The Spirit, there’s no stopping the ecstatic response.

The Vatican says John Lennon’s quote was “a boast.” Wrong. It was an observation. A contemptuous, incredulous observation. John Lennon was the first Beatle to truly despise Beatlemania. His arrogant, biting quips to adoring fans are legendary.

But the Vatican was right about one thing. John Lennon was a young man grappling with fame. And grappling badly much of the time.

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John Lennon  hated fame, yet could not stop seeking it [a paradox — both are true yet irresolvable]

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When he and wife Yoko posed naked on the cover of Two Virgins, John is at once a narcissistic exhibitionist and a man pleading with himself and the world, “I’m just a man.”

In that same notorious interview, by the way, Lennon described the 12 apostles as “thick” and “ordinary.” Which they were. Once again, John Lennon is right.

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That’s why Jesus’ apostles have always inspired me, actually. Because they are just like me.

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John Lennon was a celebrity. In Latin literally “the one who helps us celebrate.” And did he ever help us celebrate. And the price he paid was the burden of fame. Celebrity is a calling. Fame is simply nuts. In the end fame killed him.

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If anybody needs forgiveness here, it’s us.

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One Response to And literally for God’s sake, can someone turn off Pat Robertson’s microphone as soon as possible?! His version of Christianity is a far cry from what the vast majority of other Christians aspire to follow. I don’t think Jesus told us to throw our neighbors under the bus like Pat wants us to believe. Jesus instead said to love them unconditionally. — Kyle Anderson

  1. Pingback: Albert Camus’ Paradox: Camus was Augustine’s acolyte — the absence of religious belief can simultaneously be accompanied by a longing for “salvation and meaning” | Curtis Narimatsu

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