The confounding irony is that the precept of the inherent worth and dignity of every person has unintentionally spiraled us backward into isolated individualism instead of committing us to the hard work of building the beloved community. — sage Carl Gregg

 

*

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+cosmic+irony&qpvt=images+cosmic+irony&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=993684A09DB239C333643FD2383C934ADD51A4BB&selectedIndex=870

*

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+stages+of+religious+faith&qpvt=images+stages+of+religious+faith&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=C040402080255847A373CF083322F35C9FAF7A5B&selectedIndex=0

*

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+cosmic+irony&qpvt=images+cosmic+irony&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=CE21F07CF023FEE70754C13EDDFCED605E9964EA&selectedIndex=605

*

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+stages+of+religious+faith&qpvt=images+stages+of+religious+faith&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=EB3F83F9257F1FB99F275591832BD9B923E20AF3&selectedIndex=30

*

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+cosmic+irony&qpvt=images+cosmic+irony&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=3A94A517CAC630B40C53C10B96FAA4A0ED6F7655&selectedIndex=33

*

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+cosmic+irony&qpvt=images+cosmic+irony&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=DAF33A6341E26C304B4943BA92797C0123A59A47&selectedIndex=32

*

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+cosmic+irony&qpvt=images+cosmic+irony&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=24C604B1519F8C54F0F1DDFE4B91702D27992E16&selectedIndex=666

*

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+cosmic+irony&qpvt=images+cosmic+irony&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=57158F96E7C7C55C5C06C66A5ADAE43F4432A6D2&selectedIndex=68

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+cosmic+irony&qpvt=images+cosmic+irony&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=8CB0E78528576582D85C8E6A246791DF716E3729&selectedIndex=476

*

*

*

http://www.patheos.com/blogs/carlgregg/2013/03/what-is-our-conveyer-belt/

*

Universalizing  reaches beyond  tribes to embody the boundary-less compassion, insight, and wisdom that is the core of human potential — think of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Mohandas Gandhi, Dorothy Day and Aung San Suu Kyi, Nelson Mandela and Thich Nhat Hanh. (All of these figures, of course, despite their high levels of spiritual or moral achievement, have other areas that were immeasurably underdeveloped if you study their biographies)

*

Along these lines there was an article in the winter issue of UU World called “The End of iChurch.” The iChurch in the title has the ironically lower cased “i” of the iPhone, iPod, or iPad. It’s ironically lower-cased, of course, because those devices — despite the ways they do legitimately connect us through social media — can also contribute profoundly to the narcissism of upper-case “I” individualism. But an un-ironic, upper-case I-Pod, I-Phone, or I-Pad probably wouldn’t sell as well!

*

*

*

*

*

https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/05/10/irony-can-include-paradox-and-paradox-can-include-irony/

*

*

*

*

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+paradox+as+irony&qpvt=images+paradox+as+irony&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=5AE18C957A19C61EBE89675A63DD71BC4DFB134D&selectedIndex=3

*

*

*

*

*

https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/05/04/jesus-makes-clear-that-to-forgive-is-to-forget-propitiation-and-their-sins-and-iniquities-i-will-remember-no-more-hebrews-1017/

*

*

*

*

https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/03/10/topic-irony/

*

*

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irony#Irony_as_infinite.2C_absolute_negativity

*

Irony as paradox  [subtitled as negativity]

*

Where much of philosophy attempts to reconcile opposites into a larger positive project, Kierkegaard and others insist that irony—whether expressed in complex games of authorship or simple litotes—must, in Kierkegaard’s words, “swallow its own stomach.”

*

Irony entails endless reflection and violent reversals, and ensures incomprehensibility at the moment it compels speech.

*

Similarly, among other literary critics, writer David Foster Wallace viewed the pervasiveness of ironic and other postmodern tropes as the cause of “great despair and stasis in U.S. culture, and that for aspiring fictionists [ironies] pose terrifically vexing problems.”

*

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Sincerity

*

In response to the hegemony of metafictional and self-conscious irony in contemporary fiction, writer David Foster Wallace predicted, in his 1993 essay “E Unibus Pluram: Television and U.S. Fiction,” a new literary movement which would espouse something like the New Sincerity ethos:

“The next real literary “rebels” in this country might well emerge as some weird bunch of anti-rebels, born oglers who dare somehow to back away from ironic watching, who have the childish gall actually to endorse and instantiate single-entendre principles. Who treat of plain old untrendy human troubles and emotions in U.S. life with reverence and conviction. Who eschew self-consciousness and hip fatigue. These anti-rebels would be outdated, of course, before they even started. Dead on the page. Too sincere. Clearly repressed. Backward, quaint, naive, anachronistic. Maybe that’ll be the point. Maybe that’s why they’ll be the next real rebels. Real rebels, as far as I can see, risk disapproval. The old postmodern insurgents risked the gasp and squeal: shock, disgust, outrage, censorship, accusations of socialism, anarchism, nihilism. Today’s risks are different. The new rebels might be artists willing to risk the yawn, the rolled eyes, the cool smile, the nudged ribs, the parody of gifted ironists, the “Oh how banal.” To risk accusations of sentimentality, melodrama. Of overcredulity. Of softness. Of willingness to be suckered by a world of lurkers and starers who fear gaze and ridicule above imprisonment without law. Who knows.”

In his essay “David Foster Wallace and the New Sincerity in American Fiction,” Adam Kelly argues that Wallace’s fiction, and that of his generation, is marked by a revival and theoretical reconception of sincerity, challenging the emphasis on authenticity that dominated twentieth-century literature and conceptions of the self.

*

https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/05/09/this-is-water-david-foster-wallace-wallace-used-many-forms-of-irony-but-focused-on-individuals-continued-longing-for-earnest-unselfconscious-experience-and-communication-in-a-media-s/

*

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Post-irony

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paradox#Paradox_in_philosophy

*

*

Paradoxes are irresolvable truths, not contradictions, in which only one opposite is true [a contradiction]

*

*

*

*

*

*

http://www.academia.edu/2541288/Towards_an_Ethics_of_Irony_The_Paradox_of_Love_in_the_Symposium_

*

“In Critical Fragment 48 Schlegel remarks that, ‘Irony is the form of paradox.  Paradox is everything simultaneously good and great.’  This is the best articulation of the concept of irony in the German Romantic tradition: in contrast to the classical trajectory of irony embodied in the figure of Socrates who rhetorically dissembles his own knowledge, Schlegel’s fragment is emblematic of an irony that is a condition of possibility of objects, literary or otherwise, occurring in time and space. 

The form of paradox becomes the horizon of potential that, for instance, allows good works to be read, un-read and re-read in countless interpretations hence becoming the great works of history. Or, in Kierkegaardian terms, which themselves are spectralized reproductions of Aristotelian terminology, irony allows one literary actuality to be superseded by the potentiality located in the literary actuality itself. As thus envisaged, hermeneutic progress itself hinges upon this ironic potential.

But what about ‘progress’ and ‘potential’ thought of in terms of political hope?  Can irony, this condition of possibility, inform an ethics?

Ironically, perhaps an answer is to be found not in the German Romantic tradition, but in the very classical tradition that has been consistently distinguished from it.  In sticking with the idea of irony as a condition of possibility and without defining it tout court, I shall argue that Socrates’s exploration of the concept of love in the Symposium not only pre-dates the structure of irony normally attributed to the German Romantic movement, but also compliments it as a relevant form of ethics for contemporary times.  It would be ironic indeed if irony itself, normally a suspect trope in the field of ethics, allowed all ethical questions to occur in the first place. 

To me, Socrates simply called this condition love— this paper seeks to further elaborate this thought.”

*

http://books.google.com/books?id=6EAw-H8zvDkC&pg=PA115&lpg=PA115&dq=Critical+Fragment+48+Schlegel+irony+is+paradox&source=bl&ots=0vE_ZSo4_8&sig=S-Wj3HJJlCszh7DtMNhS5rdSxAU&hl=en&sa=X&ei=MXuNUe2_FKOtigLE8IAw&sqi=2&ved=0CFIQ6AEwCA#v=onepage&q=Critical%20Fragment%2048%20Schlegel%20irony%20is%20paradox&f=false

*

*

http://www.bachelorandmaster.com/criticaltheories/friedrich-schlegel.html

*

*

*

*

*

*

Irony and paradox as distinct and not convergent   –

*

http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/sol/standards_docs/english/2010/lesson_plans/reading/nonfiction/9-12/14_11-12_readingnonfiction_recognizing_ambiguity_contraction.pdf

*

*

*

*

http://www.bu.edu/wcp/Papers/Lite/LiteBred.htm

*

*

Paradox and irony seem quite distinct.

*

Paradox  relies on the clarity and exactness of language; it shows that truth can be expressed by words alone.

*

Irony  uses words to point beyond language. Irony shows that there are some truths which, though they cannot be articulated in words, can none the less be expressed by means of words. Irony, like many other figures, is a way of transcending and ultimately extending the limited resources of everyday language, of ensuring that it does not disguise thought but is both the midwife and the medium of thought. Not everything that can be thought at all can be thought clearly, but everything that can be thought at all can be put into words.

*

*

*

*

*

*

And yet,

*

The Epicurean paradox “problem of evil” is a cosmic irony due to the sharp contrast/incongruity between reality and human ideals, or between human intentions and actual results. The resulting situation is poignantly contrary to what was expected or intended.

*

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Paradoxes#Philosophy

*

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irony#Cosmic_irony_.28Irony_of_fate.29

*

*

*

 

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s