Conundrum? For me, it’s a banal observation of the human condition. The reason commitments matter so much is precisely because human beings, by nature, are such permissive masters of their own desires. Which is to regularly not be masters at all. This explains, I think, why the world’s great religions agree desire itself is the enemy. The Hebrews gave us the Tenth Commandment “Thou Shalt Not Covet.” The word “covet” in Hebrew means “to desire greatly.” The Buddhists constantly admonish us about our carnal ego attachments.The devil knows Jesus is fasting, knows he’s hungry, and tempts him to turn stones into bread. “Man does not live by bread alone,” Jesus says, not so much to teach the devil anything new but to remind himself of the greater goal.Human beings are capable of desiring awful things: death, destruction, suffering, humiliation, vengeance. Setting goals and bringing effort and commitment and discipline to achieving those goals is a fine thing. But you’ll hardly ever meet anyone older than 21 who hasn’t regularly torpedoed a noble goal with a petty, shallow, or sometimes sordid desire. In the end, our unruly desires can’t be mastered by mere effort and intention. The desires themselves must be transformed. — Steven Kalas

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http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+love+is+sacrifice+for+one+another&qpvt=images+love+is+sacrifice+for+one+another&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=8376B33BC454FDF94C322DDB309F01BF7AA4DA33&selectedIndex=88

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3 Steps To Making That Change (At Last)

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http://www.reviewjournal.com/columns-blogs/steven-kalas/humanitys-desire-immediate-gratification-blocks-worthy-goals

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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/steven-a-krueger/moral-relativism-and-commencement-politics-cardinal-omalley-boycott-prime-minister-enda-kenny-boston-college_b_3300342.html?utm_hp_ref=religion

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The U.S. bishops’ worldview, focus and behavior, representing their attitudes and values, have gradually changed in the past 15 years.  This change has given effect to their own hierarchical brand of moral relativism that has emerged at the expense of a diminished role as pastors. 

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Unfortunately, it has also reduced the advancement of the core of the Catholic Social Justice Tradition in the hearts of lay Catholics:

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helping the poor. 

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It is attributable to a confluence of overlapping Church and politically related factors including:

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the elevation of more conservative priests to bishops, beginning under John Paul II;

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the emergence of the not-so-subtle Evangelical-Catholic (bishops)-Republican alliance starting in the mid 1990s;

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and the need of the U.S. bishops to regain their moral authority squandered as a result of, and too often in response to, the clergy sexual abuse crisis.  To this last point, it is a notable coincidence that the U.S. bishops’ assertion of their authority over Catholics in political life followed the news cycle of the crisis.

In the context of this hierarchical moral relativism, Cardinal O’Malley’s boycott of the Boston College commencement can be viewed as a reflection of a collective mindset that entraps too many of the U.S. bishops today.

I sympathize with many of the good Catholic bishops within our Church and count Cardinal O’Malley among those.  However, what the Catholic Church needs today is love — not more enforcement.  Perhaps if we all asked ourselves why the selection of Pope Francis has, by all accounts, animated the hearts and imagination of Catholics, and people of good will throughout the world, we might find a consensus direction for building the culture of a more caring Church and society that will put the matter of both politicizing the Eucharist and boycotting ceremonies of such venerable Catholic institutions as Boston College behind us.

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