If all things are lawful, does that mean we can do anything we want? Some Christians like to quote the first half of these verses, neglecting what else they say: Not all lawful things are profitable. Not all lawful things edify. Do not be mastered by anything. — Israel Tour Bible Studies

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+pick+and+choose+christianity&qpvt=images+pick+and+choose+christianity&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=81908A77EE450067832FB36AA2A8BEB587112758&selectedIndex=6

*

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+pick+and+choose+christianity&qpvt=images+pick+and+choose+christianity&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=C40C39AA91383D873E18035B59D956D5A0C8C335&selectedIndex=20

*

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+pick+and+choose+christianity&qpvt=images+pick+and+choose+christianity&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=F6612F1B9F473A02120A36ED459878A14F106CD0&selectedIndex=13

*

*

*

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+pick+and+choose+christianity&qpvt=images+pick+and+choose+christianity&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=459FB8DCC8668BBEDE209C6B076971F0963CA984&selectedIndex=3

*

*

*

*

*

http://webspace.webring.com/people/si/israeltour/20000218sacrifices.html

*

How Christians Should Pick and Choose the Laws they follow

*


And so, Christ came. He died for our sins. He became the final sacrifice. He took those sins that were covered up, and erased them altogether. Now what? What does that do to the law? At the very least, we certainly seem freed from offering sacrifices ever again. After all, any future violation has been paid for. So, are we freed from obeying the entire law now? Well, in a logical sense we are..

*
For those with Christ, there is no law. Look at what Paul says in
1 Corinthians 6:12, “All things are lawful for me, but not all things are profitable. All things are lawful for me, but I will not be mastered by anything.”  And see what else he says in 1 Corinthians 10:23, “All things are lawful, but not all things are profitable. All things are lawful, but not all things edify.” I love it when scripture is logical. For example, we concluded that by laying all of our iniquity on Christ (Isaiah 53:6), we were therefore freed from the law of sacrifices, and therefore freed from the law in general. It was a logical conclusion that makes Jewish people flinch. However, if we are to believe the Laws and the Profits of the Jews, then there is no other conclusion to come to: the coming of the messiah must necessarily release us from the law – and Paul says as much in these 2 verses of 1 Corinthians when he writes, “All things are lawful.” And they are.

*
If all things are lawful, does that mean we can do anything we want? Some Christians like to quote the first half of these verses, neglecting what else they say: Not all lawful things are profitable.  Not all lawful things edify.  Do not be mastered by anything.

*
Take your favorite sinful habit. What do you accomplish by it? You harm your relationship with God. That’s unprofitable, and does not edify. You risk letting it become your master instead of God. However, because Christ is your savior, under the law, you are free to do it. So, why don’t you?

*
Using Paul’s writing to explain our freedom
from the law is only proper if we are willing to consider what Paul does with his own freedom. Look at 1 Corinthians 9:19 – 23…
“For though I am free from all men, I have made myself a slave to all, that I might win the more. And to the Jews I became as a Jew, that I might win Jews; to those who are under the Law, as under the Law, though not being myself under the Law, that I might win those who are under the Law; to those who are without law, as without law, though not being without the law of God but under the law of Christ (note: Jer. 31:33), that I might win those who are without law. To the weak I became weak, that I might win the weak
; I have become all things to all men, that I may by all means save some. And I do all things for the sake of the gospel, that I may become a fellow partaker of it.”

*
If you’re ever tempted to use Paul to justify your freedom to sin, then recalling what Paul did with his freedom should bring you right back into line. If you really want to use Paul’s writings to prove your freedom from the law, then you also have to use Paul’s writings to show what that freedom is for, and follow his example. Paul’s freedom is indeed absolute, but it’s a freedom that allows him to serve God more, not less, “For woe is me if I do not preach the gospel.” (1 Corinthians 8:16b)

*
So, how do you pick and choose what you do and don’t do?

*

Well, if everything you do is for the furtherance of the kingdom, then you have your answer. Use your freedom from the law to win others to Christ. However, not everyone is called to preach, and there are other ways to serve. “Now there are varieties of gifts, but the same Spirit. And there are varieties of ministries, and the same Lord. And there are varieties of effects, but the same God who works all things in all persons (1 Corinthians 12:4 – 6) … Now you are Christ’s body, and individually members of it. And God has appointed in the church, first apostles, second prophets, third teachers, then miracles, then gifts of healings, helps, administrations, various kinds of tongues. All are not apostles, are they? All are not prophets, are they? All are not teachers, are they? All are not workers of miracles, are they? All do not have gifts of healings, do they? All do not speak with tongues, do they? All do not interpret, do they? But earnestly desire the greater gifts. And I show you a still more excellent way (1 Corinthians 12:27 – 31).”  Chapter 13 goes on to explain that no spiritual gift is worth anything if you do not have love. Without love, you are nothing. “But now abide faith, hope, love, these three; but the greatest of these is love (1 Corinthians 13:13).”

*
So, now we have our bottom line. Abide in love, and your total freedom from the law will be used for the furtherance of God’s kingdom. When you think about it, this makes sense. After all, isn’t it out of love that we try to win others over to Christ? It certainly should be. Self-righteousness repels others. Love attracts them. Therefore, Paul’s bottom line is a very practical one, because the gospel itself is practical. It’s just not always convenient.

*
Basing our conduct on love is not new, and was not invented by Paul. It wasn’t even first preached by Christ. It was actually introduced by Moses. He wrote in
Deuteronomy 6:5, “And you shall love the LORD your god with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your might.”  Then in Leviticus 19:18c, “you shall love your neighbor as yourself.”  In fact, a lawyer once asked Jesus a question, “testing him, ‘which is the great commandment of the law?’ And He said to him,  ‘ “You shall love the LORD your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your mind.”  This is the great and foremost commandment. The second is like it, “You shall love your neighbor as yourself.”  On these two commandments depend the whole Law and the Prophets (Matthew 22:35 – 40).’ “

*
So, not only do we now have a basis for our conduct, we have an Old Testament basis for it, sited to us by no less than Jesus Christ Himself. These two verses, Deuteronomy 6:5 and Leviticus 19:18c, have been
referred to collectively as the Sh’ma by Jews for thousands of years, and they are the basis for our conduct. Isn’t that awesome? As much as we talk about behaving like a Christian, we have actually been given a Jewish basis for our conduct!
With all that we’ve discovered here, it still begs one serious question, “How do I love?”  Jesus has commanded us to love. Paul correctly exhorts us to base all conduct and service on love. But, how do you do that?

*

It just so happens that the Old Testament is filled with ideas. Furthermore, these ideas are from God.

*

Among them are the 10 commandments.

*
How to love God with all our heart, soul, and mind: 1. Have no other gods before Him. 2. Make no idols, or any likeness of heaven, earth, or water. 3. Don’t take God’s name in vain. 4. Keep the Sabbath holy. 5. Honor your parents.
How to love our neighbor as yourself: 6.   Don’t murder. 7.   Don’t commit adultery. 8.   Don’t steal. 9.   Don’t lie. 10. Don’t covet.

*
I
t is so easy to point at the 10 commandments as our code of conduct, that we can appear legalistic to outsiders. But, the truth of the matter is that we can’t love God if we’re loving another God. We can’t love our neighbor if we commit adultery or lie. However, it’s easy to continue loving God and my neighbors while I eat a bacon cheeseburger, and have rounded sideburns, on Passover.

*
So, we do some things that are commanded in the OT, and don’t do others, and because we point to the things in the OT that we obey, and don’t discuss the things that we don’t obey, it looks to outsiders like we’re picking and choosing what we do and don’t adopt from the OT, when that’s not the case at all. Simply, we are not obliged to follow any of the laws, from a legalistic stand-point. However, God has put in all of us a love for Him that we can’t explain, and we need guidance in focusing that love appropriately. Thankfully, we have it in the Old Testament.

*
Are we going to fail? Yes. Are we going to sin? Yes. Are we going to knowingly sin? Sadly, yes. But, because we’ve accepted Christ as our messiah, we’ll feel bad when we do these things, and will feel moved by our LORD to love Him better. Think of the following in your life: do you ever say something to your spouse that you shouldn’t, that you know you shouldn’t, but you do it anyway? Did that spouse leave you or forgive you? Well, when you wrong God, He forgives you. If a person could continue loving you despite your flaws, how much more so would a God? So you see, being freed from the Law puts us into a relationship with God that makes us honor God in our actions more than a legalistic philosophy would, because our actions are from our hearts. If you’ll recall as well, everything we’ve seen in the sacrificial Law points toward a faith doctrine. So, it only makes sense that God would lead to us to a place where our faith is what counts, because the Law of obedience has been done away with. He’s written the Law on our hearts.

*
Keep yourself focused on why you do things. Did you do it because you love God, or because it was a law given to the Jews? If the former, you do good. If the latter, then you’re doing it for the wrong reason, and provide others with a means to accuse you.

*
We have actually seen the law fulfilled in our life in a way that no orthodox Jew today ever will (unless they accept Jesus). We have offered up to God a sacrifice for our sins. If they want to get legalistic about it, we’re the ones who have offered up a sacrifice, not them.
My fellow Jews say that they don’t have to offer up sacrifices because there is no temple. However, God gave them the sacrificial law before there ever was a temple. They could build a tabernacle if they wanted to. I point out to the Jew that God must have known there would be no temple one day, and that obviously God let that happen. Instead of concluding that God has released me as a Jew from offering sacrifices, I conclude that God’s reason for allowing the destruction of the temple is that He’d made other arrangements for me. Those arrangements are a messiah, the one He prophesied in the Old Testament. He made sure to send that messiah before the temple was destroyed, so that there would always be an acceptable sacrifice for sins, temple or no temple.

*
In closing, be careful when talking to a Jew about accepting his Bible as your own. You have accepted it, but you open yourself up to the type of attack we’ve been discussing: “If you accept our Bible, then why do you discard parts of it?” 

*

My answer is this:


I have offered up a sacrifice that the Jewish law was a precursor to, a sacrifice of faith, not blind obedience. That sacrifice is Jesus Christ. It’s a sacrifice that frees me from all Biblical law, because that sacrifice was for all time. That sacrifice fulfilled the Law for me so that I don’t have to fulfill that Law with my conduct. However, God has given me a love for Him and others that causes me to serve Him with all my heart. It’s a love that doesn’t presume upon my freedom by sinning, but that builds upon my freedom by doing my share to add others to Christ’s kingdom, a kingdom promised to the Jews, but given to the Gentiles as well. It is because of that love that I continue to follow those Jewish laws that are inherently loving, specifically but no limited to the 10 Commandments.

*

*

*

*

https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/05/21/biblical-pauls-fruit-of-the-spirit-love-joy-peace-patience-kindness-goodness-faithfulness-gentleness-and-self-control-gal-522-23-if-you-pick-and-choose-parts-of-scripture-as-you-des/

*

*

*

*

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/neale-donald-walsch/buffet-style-bible-believers_b_3374774.html?utm_hp_ref=religion

*

Buffet-Style Bible Believers

*

I don’t mind when people use the Bible as their Source and Authority on matters of spiritual consequence, but I do have a problem with people who use the Bible “buffet style,” choosing only those verses that suit their purpose or personal opinion, then ignoring anything and everything that does not — or that they think might make them, as staunch believers in the Bible, “look bad.”

The Rev. Tim Reed, pastor of First Baptist Church of Gravel Ridge in Jacksonville, Ark., may not be a Buffet Bible Believer, but I would like to ask him some questions, just to make sure.

Rev. Reed was quoted in a news story the other day as saying that his church has no choice but to terminate its charter with Boy Scout Troop 542 because the Boy Scouts of America has lifted its ban on openly guy youths. Reed told one of the major television news networks that “it’s not a hate thing.” He said it is a “moral stance we must take as a Southern Baptist Church.”

The Christian minister was quoted by the network as saying: “God’s word explicitly says homosexuality is a choice, a sin.” Others likewise use “God’s word” as their authority in this matter, most often pointing to the Bible’s book of Leviticus at Chapter 18, Verse 22. As found in the King James Version that verse says: “Thou shalt not lie with mankind, as with womankind: it is abomination.”
Many Buffet Bible Believers also cite Leviticus 20:13, which offers this: “If a man also lie with mankind, as he lieth with a woman, both of them have committed an abomination: they shall surely be put to death; their blood shall be upon them.” And still others often point to 1 Corinthians 6:9, which says, “Know ye not that the unrighteous shall not inherit the kingdom of God? Be not deceived: neither fornicators, nor idolaters, nor adulterers, nor effeminate, nor abusers of themselves with mankind…”

Using the Bible in this way may seem to provide righteous authority to some Southern Baptist churches, most of which are predicted to end their charters with Scouting in the weeks ahead. That could amount to nearly 4,000 Boy Scout troops soon without a sponsor. Richard Land, head of the Southern Baptists’ Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission, was quoted in the news story mentioned above as saying that “Southern Baptists are going to be leaving the Boy Scouts en masse.”

OK. Now. Fair Question time. Which verses of the Bible should be operative in our lives if we are to live up to its moral injunctions, as the Southern Baptists feel that are doing in response to the Boy Scouts’ decision to admit gay youths?

Do you suppose it might be the verse in the Book of Deuteronomy where it says that if a man marries a woman and finds that she is not a virgin, and if her family cannot prove that she was a virgin before her marriage, “she shall be brought to the door of her father’s house and there the men of her town shall stone her to death”? Or perhaps it would be the verse that says that if found to be in an adulterous relationship, both the man and the woman are to be taken to the city gates and also stoned to death. (Please keep in mind that if this were to be applied, some churches would have to stone to death their own ministers.)

Or perhaps it’s the verse that says that only certain people are welcome in God’s house of worship. If you happen to be a child born out of wedlock, or the great-great-great-grandchild of a person born out of wedlock, God says you may not set foot inside a church. The Bible makes this very clear. It says that no illegitimate child, “nor any of his descendants may enter the assembly of the Lord, even down to the tenth generation.

And did you know this? If a certain part of a man’s body happens to be injured in an accident or as a result of war, he may likewise not join with other worshippers of God in a House of the Lord. The Bible says: “If a man’s testicles are crushed or his penis is cut off, he may not be included in the assembly of the Lord.”

Yes, these are words right out of the Bible. Turn to Deuteronomy 23:1-2, New Living Translation. “Oh,” you might say, “one of those modern Bibles.” Yes. The King James Version has it this way: “He that is wounded in the stones, or hath his privy member cut off, shall not enter into the congregation of the Lord,” but it means the same thing.

And the Bible has some startling news for women who take some of those self-defense classes that are offered these days. They can find themselves in a lot of trouble because of some of what they might learn in those classes. The Bible says: “If two men are fighting and the wife of one of them comes to rescue her husband from his assailant, and she reaches out and seizes him by his private parts, you shall cut off her hand. Show her no pity.”

God’s Word also provides us clear guidance on what to do about children who don’t obey their parents. These are probably not thoughts that many mothers would have — maybe even not Southern Baptist mothers, but we have no choice but to obey. As Rev. Reed would say, “God’s word explicitly tells us” how we are to respond. And what does God’s Word instruct us to do with rebellious children?

Kill them.

Now you might not believe that, but it’s right there, plain as day, and you can’t deny God’s Word: “If a man has a stubborn and rebellious son who does not obey his father and mother and will not listen to them when they discipline him, his father and mother shall take hold of him and bring him to the elders at the gate of his town. They shall say to the elders, ‘This son of ours is stubborn and rebellious. He will not obey us. He is a profligate and a drunkard.’ Then all the men of his town shall stone him to death. You must purge the evil from among you.

I guess that would do it, all right…

So with respect, I ask you to excuse me, Pastor Reed, if I am not totally convinced that humanity’s infallible answers will be found in the Bible. You may not agree with all of the above verses, either. But if we are going to be Buffet Bible Believers, rather than a Literal Word of God Believer, than might you please tell us which verses of the Bible we are advised to ignore, and which we should apply to the letter?

Thank you, sir. That would be very helpful. We would not want to be called hypocrites for citing some verses of God’s Word when they support our personal prejudices, and ignoring others when they do not, now would we?

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s