In praise of Herb Alvarez: The symbol [Scripture reading] is not the thing [prompting of the Spirit] it represents — True interpretation depends neither on historical inquiry nor on erudite literary analysis but on attentiveness to the promptings of the Spirit, who reveals the Gospel through Scripture in surprising ways. The freedom of intertextual play is grounded in a secure sense of the continuity of God’s grace: Paul trusts the same God who spoke through Moses to speak still in his own transformative reading. Another instance of prompting of the Spirit: John 4:24 — God is a Spirit: and they that worship him must worship him in spirit and in truth.

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http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+prompting+of+the+spirit&qpvt=images+prompting+of+the+spirit&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=4AD884080026454B9EEB6489CDAC59907D74D423&selectedIndex=1

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http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+prompting+of+the+spirit&qpvt=images+prompting+of+the+spirit&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=D39406BC228EDCC4C5B8AAAAB3CDBFE205899750&selectedIndex=203

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http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+prompting+of+the+spirit&qpvt=images+prompting+of+the+spirit&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=C460DE201E91984C56697C06F721946A2A2E5140&selectedIndex=877

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/05/24/richard-hays-echoes-of-scripture-in-the-letters-of-paul-pauls-readings-of-scripture-are-not-constrained-by-a-historical-scrupulousness-about-the-original-meaning-of-the-texts-esch/

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Richard Hays’ Echoes of Scripture in the Letters of Paul:  Paul’s readings of Scripture are not constrained by a historical scrupulousness about the original meaning of the texts. Eschatological meaning subsumes original sense…. True interpretation depends neither on historical inquiry nor on erudite literary analysis but on attentiveness to the promptings of the Spirit, who reveals the gospel through Scripture in surprising ways. In such interpretations, there is an element of playfulness, but the freedom of intertextual play is grounded in a secure sense of the continuity of God’s grace: Paul trusts the same God who spoke through Moses to speak still in his own transformative reading. Just as my lectionary commentary invites Christians to read the Bible as Jesus read the ‘Bible’ in his day (with a hermeneutic of love), Hays’ work invites us to embrace the same freedom to interpret the Bible that Paul with other ancient commentators claimed.  — sage Carl Gregg

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http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=John+4%3A24&version=KJV

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/05/28/james-emery-white-the-silence-of-god-perhaps-its-not-silence-were-encountering-while-we-seek-god-but-rather-a-pregnant-pause-a-prompting-to-engage-in-personal-reflection-so-that-t/

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James Emery White:  The Silence of God  — Perhaps it’s not silence we’re encountering while we seek God, but rather a pregnant pause — a prompting to engage in personal reflection so that the deepest of answers, the most profound of responses, can be given and received.  Deep calls to deep in the roar of your waterfalls. (Psalms 41:5-7) The psalmist comes to see that there is no silence; the answer coming from God is deeper than words. God is present, and speaking, but what he’s saying isn’t resting on the surface waters of life. This is a season where deep is calling to deep or, as Thomas Kelly phrases it, a time of going “down into the recreating silences.”

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/05/30/the-fact-that-most-americans-think-the-country-would-be-better-off-if-more-americans-were-religious-shows-that-many-of-those-who-believe-religion-is-losing-its-influence-may-think-this-is-a-negative/

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Gallup poll first week of May 2013 [a month ago]  —

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“The fact that most Americans think the country would be better off if more Americans were religious shows that many of those who believe religion is losing its influence may think this is a negative state of affairs,” Gallup said in its statement.

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75 percent of respondents said it would be good if more Americans were religious. This belief was more prevalent among Americans who regularly go to church and who said religion is important in their lives. But the survey also found that over half of respondents who “seldom or never attend” a place of worship said society would benefit if more Americans were religious [perhaps the premise being that the nature of churches, not belief in God, are the reason for not attending].

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/05/18/in-praise-of-literalist-and-symbolist-herb-alvarez-john-146-i-am-the-way-and-the-truth-and-the-life-no-one-comes-to-the-father-except-through-me/

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/04/06/dismas-to-gestas-have-you-no-fear-of-god-in-praise-of-eruditeexperiencedsagacious-logosrhema-disciple-of-jesus-herb-alvarez/

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/03/15/in-praise-of-herb-alvarez-from-irresistible-grace-to-irresistible-giving/

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/03/12/in-praise-of-our-greatest-wordsmith-symbolist-herb-alvarez/

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/03/23/in-praise-of-both-symbolist-literalist-herb-alvarez-lamp-of-faith/

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/03/09/in-praise-of-married-couple-sista-clara-and-herb-alvarez-and-sista-claras-under-his-wings-social-ministry/

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Why do you look for the living [a new creation]  among the dead [love of ego]?    Symbol of humility over pride.    http://biblehub.com/luke/24-5.htm

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/02/23/radical-commitment-and-nothing-less-makes-a-marriage-thrive-sage-steven-kalas/

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Let the dead bury the dead.       Luke 9:60  http://www.all-creatures.org/discuss/matt8.18-23.html

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Cost_of_Discipleship

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http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+john+1%3a1&qpvt=images+john+1%3a1&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=DCC75B525DD71F965A089A5EEAEBFA2B8BF2D16D&selectedIndex=0

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+john+1%3a1&qpvt=images+john+1%3a1&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=D4B338DF92AE20E17A6DECE337BA9C1C56B71B20&selectedIndex=5

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http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+john+1%3a14&qpvt=images+john+1%3a14&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=D2C06A7DA7AB4046EC8A2B0CFDDF5534F9B7C62C&selectedIndex=24

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http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+john+14%3a6&qpvt=images+john+14%3a6&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=09FEF911D057FA5C9FEF6BEC4A77CBCD610D7591&selectedIndex=5

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http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+john+14%3a6&qpvt=images+john+14%3a6&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=D0C17A7FAD5CEE033349726372350ED98137C0D7&selectedIndex=58

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http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+fear+of+god&qpvt=images+fear+of+god&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=BBA74D689A9301A1E04D63BB4BBF567C39793010&selectedIndex=394

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http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+fear+of+god&qpvt=images+fear+of+god&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=D574F3E6808F6184FE4E8885C49EFFAA830BB05B&selectedIndex=264

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http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+fear+of+god&qpvt=images+fear+of+god&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=BDCA62B914150338902C195B8FE53EE206E451D1&selectedIndex=8

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http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+fear+of+god&qpvt=images+fear+of+god&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=0A5EACCB979E50D959F0D568687B6C50D4DABD74&selectedIndex=380

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http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+fear+of+god&qpvt=images+fear+of+god&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=453F49D60B40DBDE5597CBF16CB9CF7AABB06C73&selectedIndex=443

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Literally, Jesus is the Word, through which living creatures can find salvation.   

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Symbolically, die in the flesh, create a new beginning/life in the spirit of the Word, so to speak.   

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http://www.gotquestions.org/Jesus-Word-God.html

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Question: “What do John 1:1,14 mean when they declare that Jesus is the Word of God?”

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Answer:

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The answer to this question is found by first understanding the reason why John wrote his gospel.

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We find his purpose clearly stated in John 20:30-31. “Many other signs therefore Jesus also performed in the presence of the disciples, which are not written in this book; but these have been written that you may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God;

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and that believing you may have life in His name.”

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Once we understand that John’s purpose was to introduce the readers of his gospel to Jesus Christ, establishing Who Jesus is (God in the flesh) and what He did, all with the sole aim of leading them to embrace the saving work of Christ in faith,

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we will be better able to understand why John introduces Jesus as “The Word” in John 1:1.

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By starting out his gospel stating, “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God,” John is introducing Jesus with a word or a term that both his Jewish and Gentile readers would have been familiar with.

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The Greek word translated “Word” in this passage is Logos, and it was common in both Greek philosophy and Jewish thought of that day.

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For example, in the Old Testament the “word” of God is often personified as an instrument for the execution of God’s will (Psalm 33:6; 107:20; 119:89; 147:15-18).

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So, for his Jewish readers, by introducing Jesus as the “Word,” John is in a sense pointing them back to the Old Testament where the Logos or “Word” of God is associated with the personification of God’s revelation.

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And in Greek philosophy, the term Logos was used to describe the intermediate agency by which God created material things and communicated with them.

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In the Greek worldview, the Logos was thought of as a bridge between the transcendent God and the material universe.

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Therefore, for his Greek readers the use of the term Logos would have likely brought forth the idea of a mediating principle between God and the world.

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So, essentially, what John is doing by introducing Jesus as the Logos is drawing upon a familiar word and concept that both Jews and Gentiles of his day would have been familiar with and using that as the starting point from which He introduces them to Jesus Christ.

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But John goes beyond the familiar concept of Logos that his Jewish and Gentile readers would have had and presents Jesus Christ not as a mere mediating principle like the Greeks perceived, but as a personal being, fully divine, yet fully human.

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Also, Christ was not simply a personification of God’s revelation as the Jews thought, but was indeed God’s perfect revelation of Himself in the flesh, so much so that John would record Jesus’ own words to Philip: “Jesus said unto Him, ‘Have I been so long with you, and yet you have not come to know Me, Philip? He who has seen Me has seen the Father; how do you say, “Show us the Father”?’” (John 14:9).

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By using the term Logos or “Word” in John 1:1, John is amplifying and applying a concept that was familiar with his audience and using that to introduce his readers to the true Logos of God in Jesus Christ, the Living Word of God, fully God and yet fully man, who came to reveal God to man and redeem all who believe in Him from their sin.

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Read more: http://www.gotquestions.org/Jesus-Word-God.html#ixzz2TgLZHV6J

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http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=John+14:6&version=NIV#

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John 14:6

New International Version (NIV)

6 Jesus answered, “I am the way and the truth and the life.

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No one comes to the Father except through me.”

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http://townhall.com/news/faith/2013/05/13/firstperson-should-we-interpret-the-bible-literally-n1594066

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Should we interpret the Bible literally?

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Should we interpret a Bible verse literally or figuratively?

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It depends on context. A person’s soul is in peril if he thinks Jesus was using poetic exaggeration when He said,

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“I am the way, and the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me” (John 14:6).

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On the other hand, a Bible reader might maim himself unnecessarily if he fails to recognize the hyperbole in Jesus’ statement that we should cut off our hands and gouge out our eyes to avoid sin (Matthew 5:29-30).

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Like all people who have ever spoken or written, biblical authors use different styles of communication at different times.

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Of course, everything the Bible affirms is true, regardless of its literary genre.

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Still, every time we open our Bibles, we must determine what style of communication is being used and read accordingly.

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As a primer, here are a few of the literary styles used in Scripture and some rules for interpreting them taken from Robert Stein’s helpful book, “A Basic Guide to Interpreting the Bible.”

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– Historical narrative recounts events and is meant to be understood literally — not as fable. In this vein, Article XIII of the Chicago Statement on Biblical Hermeneutics insists that literary techniques not be used to evade historical accounts. For instance, some scholars have tried to fictionalize the story of Jonah and the fish, but Christ treats Jonah as a real person in Matthew 12:40-42, and so should we. More than 40 percent of the Old Testament and nearly 60 percent of the New is historical narrative, including much of the material in the Gospels and Acts.

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– Songs and poetry are geared toward evoking emotion rather than speaking with scientific accuracy. With biblical poetry, the reader must determine the author’s message without misconstruing symbolism as narrative description. For example, the song in Exodus 15 poetically describes Pharaoh’s army as being “thrown into the  sea” (15:1) even though it actually followed the Israelites through the parted waters before God sent them crashing back down.

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– Proverbs are pithy sayings that express general truths or rules of thumb; they don’t convey ironclad guarantees. A classic example is Proverbs 22:6, “Train up a child in the way he should go; even when he is old he will not depart from it.” While parental training generally sets the course for a child’s life, there are exceptions.

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– Parables are fictional stories that illustrate spiritual points. Generally, a parable teaches one basic point and is not intended as an extended comparison in which every detail has spiritual significance. About a third of Jesus’ teachings are in parables, including the story of the sower and soils in Luke 8 and the lost sheep in Luke 15.

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– Idioms are expressions with meanings not derived from the normal meanings of the words in them. In modern English, our idioms include “raining cats and dogs” and “kick the bucket.” In the Bible you will find idioms like “their hearts melted” to describe a loss of courage and “the apple of His eye” to describe being precious in God’s sight.

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The list could go on, but you get the idea. Unless we know what style of communication a biblical author is using and how to interpret it, we may wonder if archaeologists have ever found the tombs of the Good Samaritan and the Prodigal Son.

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As immense man of wisdom Herb Alvarez says, imparting the Word can be done by 1)  Parable   2)   fellowship/sisterhood group dialogue     3) one-on-one discourse.

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And there can be 3 roles  –   1)  leader Paul     2)  conciliator/intermediary Barnabas    3)  acolyte Timothy.

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Herb Alvarez’ dearest wife and wondrous agent of our Messiah to the forsaken of society, Sistah’ Clara Alvarez   –

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/04/03/in-praise-of-sistah-clara-alvarez-under-his-wings-social-ministry/

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/03/15/in-praise-of-peacemakerproblem-solver-sista-clara-alvarez-proverbs-151-a-soft-answer-turns-away-wrath/

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Our fleshly spirit of fear is cowardice/defeat by suffering needlessly.    

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Conversely, our spiritual fear of God is about obedience to Thy Heavenly Father’s Highest Power, and about carrying out God’s compassion and love for us all, though we suffer in this earthly realm.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fear_of_God#Christianity

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The Fear of God is felt because one understands the “fearful expectation of judgement” (Hebrews 10:27).

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Still, this is not a fear that leads one to despair,

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rather it must be coupled with trust, and most importantly, love.

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In Psalms 130:3-4, it is said, “If you, O Lord, kept a record of sins, O Lord, who could stand?

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But with you there is forgiveness; therefore you are feared.”

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The first mention of the fear of God in the Hebrew Bible is in Genesis 22:12, where Abraham is commended for putting his trust in God. The New Testament book of Hebrews comments on this event by explaining, “Abraham, when he was tested, offered up Isaac, and he who had received the promises was in the act of offering up his only son, of whom it was said, ‘Through Isaac shall your offspring be named.’ He considered that God was able even to raise him from the dead, from which he did receive him back.” (Heb 11:17-19).

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Because of this passage many Christians conclude that Abraham’s fear of God was an act of trust in God, that God would give Isaac back to Abraham.

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Others believe that Abraham’s fear of God was his willingness to obey God, even though it would mean losing his Son. 

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Many Jews and Christians believe the fear of God to be devotion itself, rather than a sense of being frightened of God.

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It can also mean fear of God’s judgment.   The fear of God is described in Proverbs 8:13 as “the hatred of evil.”

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Throughout the Bible it is said to bring many rewards.

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Conversely, not fearing God is said to result in Divine retribution.

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Some translations of the Bible, such as the New International Version, sometimes replace the word “fear” with “reverence.”

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This is because the Fear of the Lord incorporates more than simple fear.

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As Robert B. Strimple says, “There is the convergence of awe, reverence, adoration, honor, worship, confidence, thankfulness, love, and, yes, fear.”

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Per Herbert Alvarez’ own logo   —

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Reverse the curse!

 

(palindrome   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palindrome#Numbers  )

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Romans 12:21
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Do not be overcome by evil, but overcome evil with good.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Harbinger_(novel)

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The Harbinger is a 2012 best-selling[1] Christian novel by Rabbi Jonathan Cahn, a Messianic Jew. It suggests that the 9/11 terrorism attack was a divine warning to the United States.[2][3] Cahn ties the 9/11 attacks to Isaiah 9:10, which reads: “The bricks are fallen down, but we will build with hewn stones: the sycamores are cut down, but we will change them into cedars” (King James Version).

Synopsis

Premise

The author says that The Harbinger is a fictional story which is nevertheless concerned with a real-life connection: a prophecy about ancient Israel that was eventually fulfilled in the eighth century BC when Israel was destroyed, and certain events and facts related to the 9/11 terror attacks against the U.S. in 2001. Cahn calls these events and facts “harbingers,” and argues that they show a connection between ancient Israel’s destruction and a possible coming destruction of present-day America. He also says that ancient Israel received a warning before being destroyed, and that the 9/11 harbingers form a similar warning from God to America.[4]

“Before God judges a nation, He sends warning,” Cahn has said. “But America, like Israel, has not responded with repentance, but with defiance.”[4]

Background in Biblical history

According to the Bible, the Kingdom of Israel (or Northern Kingdom) was one of the successor states to the older United Monarchy (also called the Kingdom of Israel), which came into existence in about the 930s BC after the northern Tribes of Israel rejected Solomon’s son Rehoboam as their king. In c. 732 BC, the Assyrian king, Tiglath-Pileser III sacked Damascus and Israel, annexing Aramea[5] and territory of the tribes of Reuben, Gad and Manasseh in Gilead including the desert outposts of Jetur, Naphish and Nodab.Israel continued to exist within the reduced territory as an independent kingdom subject to Assyria until around 725720 BC, when it was again invaded by Assyria and the rest of the population deported. From this time, no trace exists of the Kingdom of Israel and its population are commonly referred as Ten Lost Tribes.

The nine harbingers

The book draws parallels between the Kingdom of Israel and the United States. The author argues that America was founded similar to ancient Israel and the Founding Fathers envisioned a country based on the rules of God and a Light Unto the Nations. The author lists a series of warnings or harbingers that were given to ancient Israel before its final destruction by the Assyrians and makes a parallel between each and the events of 9/11.

A summary of Harbingers mentioned in the book are as follows:[2]

  1. The Breach: The author argues that the United States just like ancient Israel has breached the covenant it made with God at the time of its foundation. Thus the hedge of God’s protection around America was lifted on 9/11 similar to the way the hedge of protection around ancient Israel was lifted.
  2. The Terrorist: The author argues that similar to the way that the kingdom of Israel was attacked by Assyrians, United States was attacked by Al-Qaeda. The Assyrians were a Semitic people, children of the Middle East. So too were the terrorists of 9/11.
  3. Fallen Bricks: The most visible signs of the attack on ancient Israel were that of the fallen buildings and the ruin heaps of fallen bricks. In 9/11 the most visible site of the attack was also the fallen bricks of the fallen buildings.
  4. The Tower: The harbinger symbolizes the fact that after the Assyrian attack, the kingdom of Israel did not repent from its sins but vowed to rebuild its buildings with its own power. Similarly the author argues that United States also did not repent from its sins after the warning and continued its path, vowing to rebuild on Ground Zero with its own power.
  5. Gazit Stone: The Israelites carve out quarried stone from mountain rock and bring it back to the ground of destruction where clay bricks once stood. Three years after 9/11, a 20-ton quarried rock meant to serve as the cornerstone of the new building was brought to Ground Zero. A ceremony took place over the rock in which New York Governor George Pataki pronounced: “Today, we, the heirs of that revolutionary spirit of defiance, lay this cornerstone and unmistakably signal to the world the unwavering strength of this nation, and our resolve to fight for freedom.”[6] Eventually, the stone was removed from Ground Zero.[2]
  6. Sycamore: In Isaiah 9:10, the nation of Israel declares that its sycamore trees have been destroyed by the Assyrians during the attack but they would replace them with cedar trees. After the collapse of the buildings during the 9/11 attacks, a shock wave was created that damaged most buildings around the area. Only one building was not harmed which was St. Paul’s Chapel, which was protected by a sycamore tree that is believed to have captured the blast.[7][8] Cahn points out that St. Paul’s Chapel was also the place that the government of the United States prayed on the day of the first inauguration of George Washington on April 30, 1789. The sycamore is known today as the 9/11 Sycamore and a memorial was built for it.
  7. Erez Tree: In Isaiah 9:10, the nation of Israel vows to replace the damaged sycamores with cedars, which are stronger. Two years after the events of 9/11, on November 29, 2003, an actual tree was planted in the place of the original sycamore in front of St. Paul’s Chapel. This tree was a 21-foot spruce tree and was called the Tree of Hope. The tree itself no longer exists, as it died and was dug up and destroyed and not replaced. [9]
  8. The Utterance: Or the “the vow” of defiance. For there to be a parallel with ancient Israel with this harbinger, Cahn says a national leader would have to speak the defiant vow to rebuild in the nation’s capital, which he argues that U.S. Senator John Edwards did during a 9/11 memorial on September 11, 2004, when he quoted Isaiah 9:10.[10]
  9. The Prophecy: Another parallel with ancient Israel, according to Cahn, is that a national leader must utter the Isaiah 9:10 vow as a prophecy, before such events as the replacing of the tree and the bringing of the cornerstone rock to Ground Zero. Cahn says this occurred one day after the events of 9/11, when America issued its official response to the terrorism attacks. Senator Tom Daschle, who was the Senate Majority Leader at the time and in charge of the official response, spoke before the Congress. At the end of his speech he quoted Isaiah 9:10.

The shockwave of the falling buildings destroyed a sycamore tree which was standing in front of the St. Paul’s Chapel for more than a century. Artist Steve Tobin used its roots as the base for a bronze sculpture memorial.

Nothing–nothing–can replace the losses that have been suffered. I know there is only the smallest measure of inspiration that can be taken from this devastation. But there is a passage in the Bible from Isaiah that I think speaks to all of us at times such as this:The bricks have fallen down, but we will rebuild with dressed stone; the fig trees have been felled, but we will replace them with cedars.That is what we will do. We will rebuild and we will recover. The people of America will stand strong together because the people of America have always stood together. And those of us privileged to serve this great Nation will stand with you. – Senate majority leader Tom Daschle[11]

Cahn says that the warnings of God came two times to ancient Israel before the third time when the nation was destroyed.

The Shemitah

Cahn also argues that the financial collapses of the Dow Jones Industrial Average on September 17, 2001, and September 29, 2008 (List of largest daily changes in the Dow Jones Industrial Average: Largest point changes) were also prophetic warnings. He says that both happened on the same date of the Hebrew calendar, the 29th of Elul, and that relates them to the Shmita, a Sabbath year observed every seven years in Judaism, in which the land isn’t cultivated and debts are cancelled. Cahn argues that a third strike might be the collapse of the American power which lies in the nation’s economy.

The Mystery of the Shemitah

Cahn has also written a non-fiction book related to The Harbinger on the shmita topic, called The Mystery of the Shemitah, which was published in September 2014 by Frontline. In this book, Cahn makes a case that understanding the seven-year pattern is essential for understanding the prophecies of the Bible and links the Great Depression and other American economic collapses to the shmita, as well as the country’s rise, and possible eventual fall, as prophesied in The Harbinger.[12]

Critical response

Glenn Beck called it “an incredible story”, saying that the author’s use of novel format was at present the only way to have a serious conversation about God for modern Americans.[13]

References

Interview with Rabbi Jonathan Cahn, Author of “The Harbinger”: http://www.faithtalks.com/posts/jonathan-cahn/
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2 Responses to In praise of Herb Alvarez: The symbol [Scripture reading] is not the thing [prompting of the Spirit] it represents — True interpretation depends neither on historical inquiry nor on erudite literary analysis but on attentiveness to the promptings of the Spirit, who reveals the Gospel through Scripture in surprising ways. The freedom of intertextual play is grounded in a secure sense of the continuity of God’s grace: Paul trusts the same God who spoke through Moses to speak still in his own transformative reading. Another instance of prompting of the Spirit: John 4:24 — God is a Spirit: and they that worship him must worship him in spirit and in truth.

  1. Pingback: In praise of Herb Alvarez & the House Church phenomenon | Curtis Narimatsu

  2. Pingback: In praise of Herb Alvarez: If you are a leader, do you lead your people to the throne (throne of God — Protestant) or do you force your people into retreat (from oppressive government — e.g. Jehovah’s Witnesses)?? “Saving soulsR

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