In praise of immensely erudite theologian Pali & Augustine’s belief that God exists outside of time in the “eternal present” — that time only exists within the created universe because only in space is time discernible through motion and change

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The most incredulous & mesmerizing “epiphany” occurred the other night  — extraordinary man of cognition Pali manifested a glimpse of “eternal time” in evangelizing with Pualani & Ehlee  — counter to God’s “eternal present” yet in line with Pali’s alter ego Augustine’s paradigm of time-consciousness — the age-old crux of descriptive psychology and theory of knowledge.    Pali picked apart time in the flesh vis a vis God’s “eternal present.”     Like Augustine scholar Hannah Arendt, Pali explained that the basis for vita socialis in Augustine can be understood as residing in neighborly love, grounded in Augustine’s understanding of the common origin of humanity.  

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Augustine#Influence

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Augustine’s arguments against magic, differentiating it from miracle, were crucial in the early Christian Church’s fight against paganism and became a central thesis in the later denunciation of witches and witchcraft.

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Augustine’s vision of the heavenly city has influenced the secular projects and traditions of the Enlightenment, Marxism, Freudianism and Eco-fundamentalism.    Post-Marxist philosophers Antonio Negri and Michael Hardt rely heavily on Augustine’s thought, particularly The City of God, in their book of political-philosophy “Empire.”

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/God_and_eternity

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Augustine of Hippo wrote that time exists only within the created universe, so that God exists outside time:

In the eminence of thy ever-present eternity, thou precedest all times past, and extendest beyond all future times, for they are still to come — and when they have come, they will be past. But “Thou art always the Selfsame and thy years shall have no end.” Thy years neither go nor come; but ours both go and come in order that all separate moments may come to pass. All thy years stand together as one, since they are abiding. Nor do thy years past exclude the years to come because thy years do not pass away. All these years of ours shall be with thee, when all of them shall have ceased to be. Thy years are but a day, and thy day is not recurrent, but always today. Thy “today” yields not to tomorrow and does not follow yesterday. Thy “today” is eternity.[1]

—St. Augustine, Confessions, Book XI, Chapter XIII

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See all the biblical passage 2Pe:3:8: “But, beloved, be not ignorant of this one thing, that one day is with the Lord as a thousand years, and a thousand years as one day.”

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http://onetheology.com/2013/03/26/augustines-confessions-a-theological-dialogue/

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Brief Summary of Augustine’s Road to Christianity

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Before I can actually do this, I think there is probably a need to present a brief overview of Augustine’s life journey. This seems necessary since some of my discussions will likely be difficult to understand without this kind of background information. Augustine was born in North Africa to a Christian mom and a secular father. His parents enabled him to receive the best education available at the time, encouraging him to devote his efforts to studying and to become a rhetorician, which was one of the most admired trades of the day. As a young man, Augustine was inwardly conflicted; his inner being was dominated by affections and dispositions of the heart that were disoriented, twisted, and configured towards evil. He was preoccupied with both sexual passions and the desire for human honor and glory. The young Augustine was simply overcome by lust, and he ran after pleasure wherever he could find it.

As he grew older, Augustine quickly become one of the most gifted rhetoricians in the Western world. His intellectual pursuits led him towards a philosophical/theological system known as “Manichaeism” (cosmic dualism). Augustine was entrenched in this particular movement for years, though he was never fully satisfied with it. One thing that Augustine seemed to be sure of at this time was that the faith of his mother was simply not for him. Although his Christian mother continually interceded for him, Augustine himself was unimpressed with the teachings of the Bible and found Christianity to be intellectually abhorrent.

The young Augustine would soon move to Rome to pursue a teaching appointment. Once in Rome, Augustine began to distance himself from Manichaeism and acquaint himself with early forms of skepticism and agnosticism. From Rome, Augustine then moved to Milan. It was here that he was first introduced to the preaching of Saint Ambrose, archbishop of Milan. Ambrose’ nuanced treatment of the biblical text, along with his graceful preaching style, helped to tear down some of the intellectual walls that were obstructing Augustine from accepting the reality of the Christian faith. In addition to his introduction to Ambrose, Augustine soon discovered Neoplatonism, which, for Augustine, would function as a bridge to Christianity. He utilized Neoplatonic categories in order to move beyond the biases that he once held against the Christian faith. After a dramatic conversion experience, Augustine devoted the rest of his life to Christ and would soon become one of the greatest and most influential theologians in the history of the Christian church.

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3 Responses to In praise of immensely erudite theologian Pali & Augustine’s belief that God exists outside of time in the “eternal present” — that time only exists within the created universe because only in space is time discernible through motion and change

  1. Pingback: Augustinian mystic Martin Luther — Aquinas cognition John Calvin — and yet, Bertrand Russell & Apostle John are Augustinian & Plato logos (analytical) acolytes — huli ‘au (upside down in Hawaiian), baby!! | Curtis Narimatsu

  2. Pingback: Here we have Augustinian mystic Martin Luther — and Aquinas cognitive John Calvin — and yet, Bertrand Russell & Apostle John are Augustinian & Plato logos (analytical) epic movers — huli ‘au (upside down in Hawaiian), baby!

  3. Pingback: Here we have Augustinian mystic Martin Luther — and Aquinas cognitive John Calvin — and yet, Bertrand Russell & Apostle John are Augustinian & Plato logos (analytical) epic movers — huli ‘au (upside down in Hawaiian), baby!

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