“What are you doing here, Elijah?” There are multiple ways that one might hear this question; it all depends on where you place the emphasis in the sentence. The simplest meaning may be: “I am surprised to see you, Elijah. I did not expect you of all people to show up on my mountain.” That would emphasize the “you.” But if you focus on the “here,” it could imply that Elijah should not be here at all, but somewhere else. As Elijah hears the silence (yes, silence may be heard), he wraps his face in his robe, and exits the cave, the better to await a further word from his God. One more thing that we all need to remember. Elijah is far from alone and neither are we. “I will leave seven thousand in Israel, all the knees that have not bowed to Baal, and every mouth that has not kissed him” (1 Kgs 19:18). Let us remember Elijah, let us listen to the silence in the midst of the world’s clamor. — John C. Holbert

 

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http://www.patheos.com/Progressive-Christian/What-Doing-Here-John-Holbert-06-17-2013?offset=1&max=1

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“What are you doing here, Elijah?” (1 Kgs 19:13). And Elijah responds word for word, precisely what he said earlier at 1 Kings 19:10. Despite historical critics, devoid of literary skills, who insist that there is a poor editor here who foolishly repeats the text, I completely disagree.

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God rejects Elijah’s repetitious nonsense completely at 1 Kings 19:15 by uttering the word “Go!” Go back to Damascus; return to the work for which I called you (1 Kgs 19:15-17).

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2 Responses to “What are you doing here, Elijah?” There are multiple ways that one might hear this question; it all depends on where you place the emphasis in the sentence. The simplest meaning may be: “I am surprised to see you, Elijah. I did not expect you of all people to show up on my mountain.” That would emphasize the “you.” But if you focus on the “here,” it could imply that Elijah should not be here at all, but somewhere else. As Elijah hears the silence (yes, silence may be heard), he wraps his face in his robe, and exits the cave, the better to await a further word from his God. One more thing that we all need to remember. Elijah is far from alone and neither are we. “I will leave seven thousand in Israel, all the knees that have not bowed to Baal, and every mouth that has not kissed him” (1 Kgs 19:18). Let us remember Elijah, let us listen to the silence in the midst of the world’s clamor. — John C. Holbert

  1. Pingback: Tribute to Jo Anne Silva: Deep calls to deep in the roar of your waterfalls. (Psalms 41:5-7) The psalmist comes to see that there is no silence; the answer coming from God is deeper than words. God is present, and speaking, but what he’s saying isn’t

  2. Pingback: Tribute to Jo Anne Silva: Deep calls to deep in the roar of your waterfalls. (Psalms 41:5-7) The psalmist comes to see that there is no silence; the answer coming from God is deeper than words. God is present, and speaking, but what he’s saying isn’t

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