Tribute to Joanne: Deep calls to deep in the roar of your waterfalls. (Psalms 41:5-7) The psalmist comes to see that there is no silence; the answer coming from God is deeper than words. God is present, and speaking, but what he’s saying isn’t resting on the surface waters of life. This is a season where deep is calling to deep or, as Thomas Kelly phrases it, a time of going “down into the recreating silences.” — James Emery White

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http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+waterfalls&qpvt=images+waterfalls&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=F10ABAF86F61383B274DA9766A46422890B89643&selectedIndex=849

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http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+silence+of+god&qpvt=images+silence+of+god&FORM=IGRE&id=9DE2954ABCBE88D3FF321E8ADE75E970A63A4690&selectedIndex=5#view=detail&id=9DE2954ABCBE88D3FF321E8ADE75E970A63A4690&selectedIndex=0

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http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+prompting+of+the+spirit&qpvt=images+prompting+of+the+spirit&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=4AD884080026454B9EEB6489CDAC59907D74D423&selectedIndex=1

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http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+prompting+of+the+spirit&qpvt=images+prompting+of+the+spirit&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=D39406BC228EDCC4C5B8AAAAB3CDBFE205899750&selectedIndex=203

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/05/28/james-emery-white-the-silence-of-god-perhaps-its-not-silence-were-encountering-while-we-seek-god-but-rather-a-pregnant-pause-a-prompting-to-engage-in-personal-reflection-so-that-t/

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James Emery White:  The Silence of God  — Perhaps it’s not silence we’re encountering while we seek God, but rather a pregnant pause — a prompting to engage in personal reflection so that the deepest of answers, the most profound of responses, can be given and received. 

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http://www.preaching.com/sermons/11545530/page-5/

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Silence.

In truth, it was the deepest conversation we had ever had. God was moving within me,

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communing and communicating with me on levels that I had never opened to him before. That night was the first of many such conversations.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spiritual_dryness

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dark_Night_of_the_Soul#Spiritual_term_in_the_Christian_tradition

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mother_Teresa#Spiritual_life

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In the 16th century, Saint John of the Cross famously described not being able to talk with God  as “the Dark Night of the Soul.”      The 17th-century Benedictine mystic Fr. Augustine Baker called it the “great desolation.”         This also is known as spiritual dryness.

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The term “dark night (of the soul)” is used in Christianity for a spiritual crisis in a journey towards union with God, like that described by Saint John of the Cross.

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Saint Thérèse of Lisieux, a 19th-century French Carmelite, wrote of her own experience. Centering on doubts about the afterlife, she reportedly told her fellow nuns, “If you only knew what darkness I am plunged into, a night of  nothingness.”

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Contrary to the mistaken belief by some that the doubts by these  saints   expressed would be an impediment to canonization, just the opposite is true; it is very consistent with the experience of canonized mystics.

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The term the “dark night of the soul”   describes a particular stage in the growth of  spiritual mystic masters.

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While this crisis is usually temporary in nature, it may last for extended periods. The “dark night” of Saint Paul of the Cross in the 18th century lasted 45 years, from which he ultimately recovered.

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Mother Teresa’s diaries show that she experienced spiritual dryness for most of her life.  Mother Teresa of Calcutta, according to letters released in 2007, “may be the most extensive such case on record,” lasting from 1948 almost up until her death in 1997, with only brief interludes of relief between.     

Franciscan Friar Father Benedict Groeschel, a friend of Mother Teresa for a large part of her life, claims that “the darkness left” towards the end of her life.

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This is a form of spiritual crisis experienced subjectively as a sense of separation from God or lack of spiritual feeling, especially during contemplative prayer. Paradoxically, spiritual dryness can lead to greater love of God.

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Such inability to communicate with God actually provides an opportunity to reach deeper in connecting with God, as seen in  the seed that fell on the rocks in Parable of the Sower, as well as to the Grain of Wheat allegory found in the Gospel of John.

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Such “passive purification” bears fruit which are “the purification of love, until the soul is so inflamed with love of God that it feels as if wounded and languishes with the desire to love Him still more intensely.”

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The theme of spiritual dryness also can be found in the Book of Job, the Psalms, the experiences of the Prophets, and many other passages of the New Testament.

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Example of Old Testament Silence   —

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/06/21/what-are-you-doing-here-elijah-there-are-multiple-ways-that-one-might-hear-this-question-it-all-depends-on-where-you-place-the-emphasis-in-the-sentence-the-simplest-meaning-may-be-i-am-surp/

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“What are you doing here, Elijah?” There are multiple ways that one might hear this question; it all depends on where you place the emphasis in the sentence. The simplest meaning may be: “I am surprised to see you, Elijah. I did not expect you of all people to show up on my mountain.” That would emphasize the “you.” But if you focus on the “here,” it could imply that Elijah should not be here at all, but somewhere else. 

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As Elijah hears the silence (yes, silence may be heard), he wraps his face in his robe, and exits the cave, the better to await a further word from his God. One more thing that we all need to remember. Elijah is far from alone and neither are we. “I will leave seven thousand in Israel, all the knees that have not bowed to Baal, and every mouth that has not kissed him” (1 Kgs 19:18).   Let us remember Elijah, let us listen to the silence in the midst of the world’s clamor.  — John C. Holbert

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/06/20/paul-is-a-mystic-he-thinks-mystically-writes-mystically-teaches-mystically-and-lives-mystically-and-expects-other-christians-to-do-likewise-paul-the-first-writer-in-the-christian-bible/

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Paul is a mystic—he thinks mystically, writes mystically, teaches mystically, and lives mystically, and expects other Christians to do likewise.

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Paul, the first writer in the Christian Bible; the very first theologian in the West, was a mystic.

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And the earliest hymns of Christianity are about the Cosmic Christ—Colossians, Philippians, Ephesians and many more. So the original followers of the Christ path were mystics, cosmic mystics of the Cosmic Christ.  — Matthew Fox

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/06/20/in-praise-of-mystic-christian-jo-anne-silva-i-recognized-that-our-seminaries-could-teach-us-how-to-think-and-even-how-to-apply-the-truths-of-scriptures-to-certain-situations-but-our-seminaries-did/

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Joanne is a mystic along the lines of Biblical Paul’s original ministry in Jesus.

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/05/24/richard-hays-echoes-of-scripture-in-the-letters-of-paul-pauls-readings-of-scripture-are-not-constrained-by-a-historical-scrupulousness-about-the-original-meaning-of-the-texts-esch/

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Richard Hays’ Echoes of Scripture in the Letters of Paul:  Paul’s readings of Scripture are not constrained by a historical scrupulousness about the original meaning of the texts. Eschatological meaning subsumes original sense….

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True interpretation depends neither on historical inquiry nor on erudite literary analysis but on attentiveness

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to the promptings of the Spirit,

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who reveals the gospel through Scripture in surprising ways.

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In such interpretations, there is an element of playfulness, but the freedom of intertextual play is grounded in a secure sense of the continuity of God’s grace: Paul trusts the same God who spoke through Moses to speak still in his own transformative reading. Just as my lectionary commentary invites Christians to read the Bible as Jesus read the ‘Bible’ in his day (with a hermeneutic of love), Hays’ work invites us to embrace the same freedom to interpret the Bible that Paul with other ancient commentators claimed.  — sage Carl Gregg

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http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=John+4%3A24&version=KJV

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Joanne’s greatest gift bestowed from God by way of God’s Grace is not Logos (the Word), but the mystic Prompting of God’s Spirit, through the Holy Spirit within Joanne.   Her Rhema sacrament personal testimony exemplifies this Prompting of the Spirit.

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/06/22/dedicated-to-jo-anne-silva-we-need-leaders-and-teams-who-will-study-their-communities-and-the-times-in-which-they-live-and-bring-a-compelling-goal-from-the-throne-of-god-that-will-call-together/

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2 Responses to Tribute to Joanne: Deep calls to deep in the roar of your waterfalls. (Psalms 41:5-7) The psalmist comes to see that there is no silence; the answer coming from God is deeper than words. God is present, and speaking, but what he’s saying isn’t resting on the surface waters of life. This is a season where deep is calling to deep or, as Thomas Kelly phrases it, a time of going “down into the recreating silences.” — James Emery White

  1. Joanne says:

    Thank you Curtis for your tribute. I turn the spotlight back to Jesus without whom there would be no reason to do a tribute.

    I am thoroughly enjoying the many quotes and passages you chose to include. They are extremely thought provoking and in many cases, worthy of embracing. Great job scholar! I will be checking back periodically to “see” what insight I might find.

  2. Pingback: In praise of freestyler Luther acolyte — the great Goethe: According to Goethe’s devotee Nietzsche, Goethe had “a kind of almost joyous and trusting fatalism” that has “faith that only in the totality everything redeems itsel

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