The poet W. H. Auden called Franz Kafka 1883-1924 (died of TB) “the Dante of the twentieth century” (1200 AD’s Dante’s progression of the pilgrimage from Hell to Paradise begins with the pilgrim’s moral confusion and ends with the vision and embrace of God) — Kafka’s themes as well embrace mystical transformation & God’s love

*

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+kafka+metamorphosis&qpvt=images+kafka+metamorphosis&FORM=IGRE

*

*

*

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Divine_Comedy

*

*

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franz_Kafka#Critical_interpretations

*

The hopelessness and absurdity common to Kafka’s works are seen as emblematic of existentialism.      Kafka also touches on the theme of human conflict with bureaucracy. William Burrows claims that such work is centred on the concepts of struggle, pain, solitude, and the need for relationships.    Others, such as Thomas Mann, see Kafka’s work as allegorical: a quest, metaphysical in nature, for God.

*

The themes of alienation and persecution, although present in Kafka’s work, have been over-emphasised by critics.   Kafka’s work is more deliberate and subversive—and more joyful—than may first appear. Reading his work while focusing on the futility of his characters’ struggles reveals Kafka’s play at humor; he is not necessarily commenting on his own problems, but rather pointing out how people tend to invent problems. In his work, Kafka often created malevolent, absurd worlds.    Kafka read drafts of his works to his friends, typically concentrating on his humorous prose. The writer Milan Kundera suggests that Kafka’s surrealist humour may have been an inversion of Dostoyevsky who presented characters who were punished for a crime. In Kafka’s work a character will be punished although a crime has not been committed. Kundera believes that Kafka’s inspirations for his characteristic situations came both from growing up in a patriarchal family and living in a totalitarian state.

*

“Kafkaesque”

The statue is a man with no head or arms, with another man sitting on his shoulders.

Jaroslav Róna‘s bronze statue of Franz Kafka in Prague

Kafka’s writing has inspired the term “Kafkaesque.”  used to describe concepts and situations reminiscent of his work, particularly Der Process and “Die Verwandlung”. Examples include instances in which people are overpowered by bureaucracies, often in a surreal, nightmarish milieu which evokes feelings of senselessness, disorientation, and helplessness. Characters in a Kafkaesque setting often lack a clear course of action to escape the situation. Kafkaesque elements often appear in existential works, but the term has transcended the literary realm to apply to real-life occurrences and situations that are incomprehensibly complex, bizarre, or illogical.

Numerous films and television works have been described as Kafkaesque, and the style is particularly prominent in dystopian science fiction. Works in this genre that have been thus described include Terry Gilliam’s 1985 film Brazil and the 1998 science fiction film noir, Dark City. Films from other genres which have been similarly described include The Tenant (1976) and Barton Fink (1991). The television series The Prisoner is also frequently described as Kafkaesque.

*

*

*

*

As always, when your knees get weak from all the trials & tibulations in life, and you feel “Kafkaesque (depressed/defeated),”  look for the helpers in life as your inspirations/picker-uppers   —

*

https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/04/20/follow-the-helpers-not-the-haters-mr-rogers-neighborhood/

*

*

*

*

https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/04/20/in-honor-of-patton-oswalt-when-you-experience-hatred-look-it-straight-away-in-the-eye-and-say-i-rebuke-you/

*

*

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to The poet W. H. Auden called Franz Kafka 1883-1924 (died of TB) “the Dante of the twentieth century” (1200 AD’s Dante’s progression of the pilgrimage from Hell to Paradise begins with the pilgrim’s moral confusion and ends with the vision and embrace of God) — Kafka’s themes as well embrace mystical transformation & God’s love

  1. Pingback: Albert Camus’ Paradox: Camus was Augustine’s acolyte — the absence of religious belief can simultaneously be accompanied by a longing for “salvation and meaning” | Curtis Narimatsu

  2. Pingback: Augustinian mystic Martin Luther — Aquinas cognition John Calvin — and yet, Bertrand Russell & Apostle John are Augustinian & Plato logos (analytical) acolytes — huli ‘au (upside down in Hawaiian), baby!! | Curtis Narimatsu

  3. Pingback: Here we have Augustinian mystic Martin Luther — and Aquinas cognitive John Calvin — and yet, Bertrand Russell & Apostle John are Augustinian & Plato logos (analytical) epic movers — huli ‘au (upside down in Hawaiian), baby!

  4. Pingback: Here we have Augustinian mystic Martin Luther — and Aquinas cognitive John Calvin — and yet, Bertrand Russell & Apostle John are Augustinian & Plato logos (analytical) epic movers — huli ‘au (upside down in Hawaiian), baby!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s