Dedicated to my mentor on the 15th annual anniversary in memoriam, June Gutmanis 1925-1998: Sir Thomas Browne-like, I wonder what a Leakey 200,000 years hence — quite likely on present trends of the family’s dedication to this field — might deduce from our remains. And what might they miss? What could they never know? But what crosses my mind is that they would still not really know how we spent our time or what made us tick as individuals. The real substance of our lives would remain obscure. As Sir Thomas Browne put it: ‘There is no antidote against the Opium of time, which temporally considereth all things; Our Fathers finde their graves in our short memories.’ — Hugh Aldersey-Williams

*

http://www.bigislandchronicle.com/2009/11/08/dispatches-from-curt-%E2%80%94-inimitable-and-auspicious-heroes-enemy-aliens-even-though-u-s-citizens-and-random-post-scripts/#comment-18778

*

Mo`o ali`i [diplomas not the measure of greatness] —

Yes, diploma-laden Bill Westervelt 1849-1939  [B.A./B.Div./Doctor Divinity Oberlin (honor.)]

our foremost authority of Haw’n folklore into English.  Bill’s undiploma’d/unadorned

esteemed prodigy nonpareil on Haw’n culture/health care/anthropology was intrepid

translator Theodore Kelsey 1891-1987, self-taught man & genesis of UH-Hilo Hawaiian

Studies/Language programs w/acolyte Edith Kanaka’ole publicly credited .  Both

Westervelt/Kelsey immersed

completely via manuahi avocations on Hawaiiana.   My kupuna June Gutmanis 1925-

1998 like my Dad & like her kupuna Theodore Kelsey, no college education [my Dad only

completed 8th grade].   But to me Kelsey/Gutmanis/my Dad were steeped in life

learning/self-educated.   As a negative example, I never forgot John Silva, who

always self-pity-ed/loathed that he always got shorted because he didn’t know how

to read & write.  Here we were 1975, & he, all but 50 yrs. old, w/no dyslexia-

innate impairment, didn’t self-start to read/write.  But at the other end, a negative

example of diploma-arrogance, was politician-Luso/Portuguese “upward mobility” icon

Walt Bento, intolerant/judgmental, who

had no clue that the Shinmachi furyoshonen/juveniles saw He-Man Kanaka/Jappy

Matsu projectile him out of White Picket Fence [haole ladies brothel] onto Mameya Lane

aka

Punahoa St.   No, da kids neva’

razz dis portagee fo whea he waz — dey wen laugh ‘cauz dis white flash

wen fling out thru da door like one white stringbean.   Mameya Lane means

beans/clit [pleasure center] in japanee!!  [for Luso-portagee Walt, fijyoka/beans]

Pleazha/treazha road, brah!   Hea we say,

eh, no tink you betta’ jus’ cause you get diploma.     Nonetheless, June Gutmanis was

cantankerous Theodore Kelsey’s devoted protege’  — & Kelsey taught her well,

because non-diploma June is the blockbuster author of integral bks. Na Pule

Kahiko [ancient prayers]/Kahuna La`au Lapa`au [herbal medicine]/Pohaku

[stones], not to mention scribed for Nat’l Geographic/various professional

journals/Readers

Digest.  Born

in Nebraska like cornhusker Swede Steve Christensen, June came up the

hard way, even being rarest female WWII pilot!!  Straight-shooting/plain-speaking [not

small

talk] tough as nails like ‘dem curmudgeon Appalachia hillbillies/Scot-Irish toughies.  June

Gutmanis

taught me all I know about HUMAN NATURE, a la sensible/pragmatic non-judgmental

Ka`u Mary Pukui & her AJA daughter Patience Namaka Bacon.  June spoke

of listening to Kelsey emote about Queen Lili`u’s timeline/life maturation

& how intolerant/grandiose throne-pusher Lili`u blew her own monarchy

right out of the tranquil Pacific Ocean, only to regret her Bento-like arrogance

after it was too late [post-1893 overthrow].   Yep, she flew out of power

like on Mameya dirt lane ’cause she thought too much of herself/megalomania.

Clearly, a Disraeli/King Solomon she was not!   See, ‘dis not about emperor/

empress worship like ‘da 442 kids/3rd generation-sansei flatulently bespeak

[pilau smell] glorified b.s. of their realistically flawed fathers. Like today’s b.s.

drivel about realistically flawed Lili`u, 442 b.s. just as bad.  Kelsey/Gutmanis got

me grounded to reality here.  Lovely, baby.  Sadly for me, June/my Mom Teruko 1916-1998

died w/n 2 weeks of each other [June fatal heart attack/Mom fatal stroke], &

my Dad Toshi 1913-1998 died just 4 months after them [pancreatic cancer][my 442nd RCT

infantryman Dad Toshi rescued mortally wounded CO & fellow PFC & was awarded Silver

Star for Dad’s bravery/valor on the field of battle  — Dad came home from the long war —

WWII — in December 1945 as poker king of the 442].

Mo`o ali`i  — they are my lifeblood throne-bearers in my eyes till this very day.

Love, –Curt

*

*

*

*

*

Mo’o ali’i      June’s great contempo & look-alike Louise Leakey age 42

*

*

https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/07/12/musica-amore-celebrate-our-45th-anniversary-of-lennons-greatest-song-across-the-universe/

*

June Gutmanis exemplified Lennon’s greatest tune, Across the Universe 1968, 30 yrs. before June’s death  —

*

*

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zw5iwrEOBRg&list=PL66916F33C7CE2D0F

*

*

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+universe&qpvt=images+universe&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=B0538CAE56FF3846E7C8A61F6C8EFCA8A75F8485&selectedIndex=4

*

*

*

*

*

Schooling Not Gauge Of Life Learning

*

Auto tycoon/GM’s Jim Roche 1906-2004 never went to college because his dad died young. Haberdasher hat-wearer Harry S. Truman never went to college, yet he was the epitome of Common Sense (practical actions) a la elementary school product Thomas Paine (father of the American Revolution).

*

Schooling is no gauge of intelligence.  Our greatest contempo destiny-maker Gov. Jack Burns  1909-1975 barely finished St. Louis High, & as a 21 yr. old flunkie who mooched off his mama/drank like no tomorrow, & smooched w/Army girls while showing off his hoops moves.

*

Gang, there is a heaven/hope springs eternal!

*

My dad Toshi 1913-1998 never even finished junior high. But Dad would listen to merits/demerits of line-item veto over budget appropriations (checks & balances/separation of power b/n executive/legislative branch). Though line-item veto used by most state governors (who also choose not to release monies if legislators override governors’ veto), U.S. Supreme Court struck down Congressional authorization of line item veto to President on ground that U.S. President (Clinton) usurped legislative sovereignty/authority.

*

Voila, there was no high school for Big Island historymaker Hiroshi Scrub Tanaka 1915-2006 to attend!  A-hole personality & non-college product  Isamu Kanekuni born 1921 knows political science better than poli-sci professors.

*

It’s about passion/immersion, not diplomas.

*

Nope, Isamu never went to college.

*

One common thing about the foregoing self-educated men — they don’t waste their breath/time tolerating small talk (who did you bump into at the supermarket today? Did you have constipation this morning? — faladoo/noisebox & political coward Luso/Portuguese JR Souza).

*

You see distinctly the small talk noiseboxes — the minute they get thrown off by your deflection of their nonsense, they immediately clam up like indian wooden statues outside a saloon.

*

Because suddenly, focus is not on their silly topics anymore. And then when they’re forced to speak substantively, their pace of enunciation slows to a crawl — because it’s not about them or their topic anymore — it’s about anything but them, which disinterests these talking heads to da bone. Luso-Portuguese faladoo/talking head minus/negative exemplars also include Wilbert Souza no relation to JR Souza of Honoka’a but might as well be since Wil’s roots are from Teves familia in Honoka’a/Frank De Luz/Butch Castro/Red Estrella the mer-look of downtown Hilo McDonald’s/sycophant & political coward-spineless Gerald De Mello.

*

*

*

Some rich folks (money-is-god Hilo’s Robert Kiyosaki born 1947 non-graduate hero list headed by Apple founder Steve Jobs) didn’t graduate from school — Henry Ford/Thomas Edison/Bill Gates/Mark Zuckerberg (Facebook)/Rich Branson (Virgin)/Walt Disney.

*

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/john-r-talbott/hi-tech-firms-overvalued_b_903918.html?utm_source=DailyBrief&utm_campaign=072011&utm_medium=email&utm_content=BlogEntry&utm_term=Daily%20Brief

*

Kiyosaki has this to say about financial learning  –   [his 2011 book Unfair Advantage]  –  what schools don’t teach about money  –  [Merrill Lynch]  If you lost money, why would you give them more money?   AIG, Fannie Mae, and Freddie Mac are still in serious trouble.   Even Warren Buffett, reportedly the world’s richest and smartest investor, and his firm Berkshire Hathaway took substantial losses in the (2008) crisis.   It fact, it was the Moody’s ratings agency, an agency he controls, that issued AAA ratings to subprime mortgages and sold these toxic mortgages, aka derivatives, to governments, pension funds, and investors throughout the world.   Selling subprime debt packaged as AAA prime debt is also known as fraud.   Buffett’s firm was instrumental in triggering this global crisis, yet the world still looks to Warren for fatherly investment advice.   On top of that, the companies he controls (Wells fargo, American Express, General Electric, and Goldman Sachs) received billions in taxpayer bailout money after the crash.   Is this Warren Buffett’s real secret to being the world’s smartest investor?

*

Boy, Buffett’s seeming indifference to Kiyosaki got Kiyosaki’s craw.

*

Opportunities to reduce taxes for business owners of 500+  employees & for investors (passive income])are almost unlimited — almost all expenses are deductible.  Big business owners, unlike small business owners who have few tax breaks (as do regular paycheck employees who pay the most taxes proportionately vs. small business owners),  invest in equipment/real estate, just as investors esp. real estate investors invest in the economy to create jobs/housing/opportunities for more investments – thence huge tax breaks for big business/investors.    But because drilling for oil is risky, such investments only are available to accredited investors.

*

*

Employer exemplars are Jack Welch of GE & Meg Whitman of eBay.   Big business exemplars are Steve Jobs of Apple/Rich Branson of Virgin/Sergey Brin of Google.  Investor exemplars are John Bogle of Vanguard Funds/George Soros of Quantum Funds (marijuana legalization proponent).

*

*

A correct contrarian opinion on Steve Jobs –

*

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/26/opinion/limits-of-magical-thinking.html?_r=1&ref=maureendowd

*

Steve Jobs, the mad perfectionist, even perfected his stare

He wanted it to be hypnotic. He wanted the other person to blink first. He wanted it to be, like Dracula’s saturnine gaze, a force that could bend your will to his and subsume your reality in his.

There’s an arresting picture of Jobs staring out, challenging us to blink, on the cover of Walter Isaacson’s new biography, “Steve Jobs.” The writer begins the book by comparing the moody lord of Silicon Valley to Shakespeare’s Henry V — a “callous but sentimental, inspiring but flawed king.”

Certainly, Jobs created what Shakespeare called “the brightest heaven of invention.” But his life sounded like the darkest hell of volatility.

An Apple C.E.O. who jousted with Jobs wondered if he had a mild bipolarity.

“Sometimes he would be ecstatic, at other times he was depressed,” Isaacson writes. There were Rasputin-like seductions followed by raging tirades. Everyone was either a hero or bozo.

As Jobs’s famous ad campaign for Apple said, “Here’s to the crazy ones. … They push the human race forward.”

The monstre sacré fancied himself an “enlightened being,” but he was capable of frightening coldness, even with his oldest collaborators and family. Yet he often sobbed uncontrollably.

Isaacson told me that Jobs yearned to be a saint; but one of the colleagues he ousted from Apple mordantly noted that the petulant and aesthetic Jobs would have made an excellent King of France.

His extremes left everyone around him with vertigo.

He embraced Zen minimalism and anti-materialism. First, he lived in an unfurnished mansion, then a house so modest that Bill Gates, on a visit, was astonished that the whole Jobs family could fit in it. And Jobs scorned security, often leaving his back door unlocked.

Yet his genius was designing alluring products that would create a country of technology addicts. He demanded laser-like focus from employees to create an A.D.D. world.

He was abandoned by parents who conceived him out of wedlock at 23, and he then abandoned a daughter for many years that he conceived out of wedlock at 23.

Chrisann Brennan, the mother of Jobs’s oldest child, Lisa, told Isaacson that being put up for adoption left Jobs “full of broken glass.” He very belatedly acknowledged Lisa and their relationship was built, Isaacson says, on “layers of resentment.”

He could be hard on women. Two exes scrawled mean messages on his walls. As soon as he learned that his beautiful, willowy, blonde girlfriend, Laurene Powell, was pregnant in 1991, he began musing that he might still be in love with the previous beautiful, willowy, blonde girlfriend, Tina Redse.

“He surprised a wide swath of friends and even acquaintances by asking them what he should do,” Isaacson writes. “ ‘Who was prettier,’ he would ask, ‘Tina or Laurene?’ ” And “who should he marry?”

Isaacson notes that Jobs could be distant at times with the two daughters he had with Laurene (though not the son). When one daughter dreamed of going to the Oscars with him, he blew her off.

Andy Hertzfeld, a friend and former Apple engineer, lent Lisa $20,000 when she thought her father was not going to pay her Harvard tuition. Jobs paid it back to his friend, but Lisa did not invite him to her Harvard graduation.

“The key question about Steve is why he can’t control himself at times from being so reflexively cruel and harmful to some people,” Hertzfeld said. “That goes back to being abandoned at birth.”

He almost always wore black turtlenecks and jeans. (Early on, he scorned deodorant and went barefoot and had a disturbing habit of soaking his feet in the office toilet.)

Yet he sometimes tried to ply his exquisite taste to remake the women in his life.

When he was dating the much older Joan Baez — enthralled by her relationship with his idol, Bob Dylan — he drove her to a Ralph Lauren store in the Stanford mall to show her a red dress that would be “perfect” for her. But one of the world’s richest men merely showed her the dress, even after she told him she “couldn’t really afford it,” while he bought shirts.

When he met his sister, Mona Simpson, a struggling novelist, as an adult, he berated her for not wearing clothes that were “fetching enough” and then sent her a box of Issey Miyake pantsuits “in flattering colors,” she said.

He was a control freak, yet when he learned he had a rare form of pancreatic cancer that would respond to surgery, he ignored his wife, doctors and friends and put the surgery off for nine months, trying to heal himself with wacky fruit diets, hydrotherapy, a psychic and expressing his negative feelings. (As though he had to be encouraged.)

Addicted to fasting because he felt it produced euphoria and ecstasy, he refused to eat when he needed protein to fight his cancer.

The Da Vinci of Apple could be self-aware. “I know that living with me,” he told Isaacson as he was dying, “was not a bowl of cherries.”

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/hugh-alderseywilliams/sharing-a-past-and-a-future_b_3563301.html?utm_hp_ref=science&ir=Science

*

‘Who knows the fate of his bones, or how often he is to be buried?’ So wrote the English physician and philosopher Sir Thomas Browne in the preface to his most celebrated essay, “Urn Burial” (1658).

Who indeed? Not Browne, that’s for sure. When he died in 1682 he was buried in the Norwich parish church where he had worshipped. In the 19th century, however, the grave was disturbed during the course of some building work, and Browne’s skull was taken for a souvenir by a surgeon at the local hospital. It was only reunited with the rest of the body in 1922, and reburied with due ceremony – the register noting Browne’s age now as 317 — although it is uncertain that the skull returned from the hospital’s collection is truly Browne’s.

Long before paleontology and anthropology developed as scientific disciplines, Urn Burial speculates eloquently on what can be understood from the unearthing of human remains. Browne even anticipates the potential for modern techniques of facial reconstruction. ‘Physiognomy outlives ourselves, and ends not in our graves,’ he wrote.

As well as providing a means of tracing hominid evolution over millions of years, human bones and associated remains can tell us much about how our ancestors lived. Their shapes reveal strengths and weaknesses and clues as to what kinds of tasks they specialised in. Their condition can tell us about disease and injury. Teeth provide clues to diet. Secondary evidence fills in other information. Fossil footprints can reveal how fast we ran. The biased cut of paleolithic axeheads suggests that our cultural bias against left-handers may be a modern thing.

This is very different from the story we were telling ourselves 150 years ago when man believed he had a God-given dominion over nature, and even Thomas Huxley believed human teeth evidenced the evolutionary superiority of white men ‘in a contest which is to be carried on by thoughts and not by bites.’ — Hugh Aldersey-Williams

But always, the stories we find are ones that resonate with our own times. Browne’s essay went down well in an age obsessed with melancholia. Louise Leakey, for her part, puts a very 21st-century environmentalist interpretation on her findings. For Leakey, understandably, we are where we come from. She even discerns in a hominid skull in the shape of the African continent. We are, she says, one of many mammalian species, one of perhaps 16 ape species to have walked upright on this planet. We share a past and the future, she says. This is very different from the story we were telling ourselves 150 years ago when man believed he had a God-given dominion over nature, and even Thomas Huxley believed human teeth evidenced the evolutionary superiority of white men ‘in a contest which is to be carried on by thoughts and not by bites.’

Browne-like, I wonder what a Leakey 200,000 years hence — quite likely on present trends of the family’s dedication to this field — might deduce from our remains. And what might they miss? What could they never know? They would discover our relative longevity, but might have trouble picking out the fine detail from all the data revealing that life expectancy has doubled only in the last century or two. They would doubtless note our general freedom from savage injury — few cracked skulls or hacked bones. They might be astonished at our crowded society, the density of our habitations, and the sheer quantities of stuff we apparently needed to surround ourselves with. They would discover from the size and shape of our bones that our lives were very sedentary. They would see from our teeth that our diet was high in sugar. They might be lucky enough to obtain traces of DNA which would show them our relatedness and our migrations.

But what crosses my mind is that they would still not really know how we spent our time or what made us tick as individuals. The real substance of our lives would remain obscure. As Sir Thomas Browne put it: ‘There is no antidote against the Opium of time, which temporally considereth all things; Our Fathers finde their graves in our short memories.’

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

8 Responses to Dedicated to my mentor on the 15th annual anniversary in memoriam, June Gutmanis 1925-1998: Sir Thomas Browne-like, I wonder what a Leakey 200,000 years hence — quite likely on present trends of the family’s dedication to this field — might deduce from our remains. And what might they miss? What could they never know? But what crosses my mind is that they would still not really know how we spent our time or what made us tick as individuals. The real substance of our lives would remain obscure. As Sir Thomas Browne put it: ‘There is no antidote against the Opium of time, which temporally considereth all things; Our Fathers finde their graves in our short memories.’ — Hugh Aldersey-Williams

  1. Pingback: In praise of freestyler Luther’s acolyte & Goethe confidant/prodigy Friedrich Schiller 1759-1805 (died of TB at age 45): The most important aspect of human freedom—the ability to defy one’s animal instincts, such as the drive for self-pr

  2. Pingback: In praise of freestyler Luther’s acolyte & Goethe confidant/prodigy Friedrich Schiller 1759-1805 (died of TB at age 45): The most important aspect of human freedom—the ability to defy one’s animal instincts, such as the drive for self-pr

  3. Pingback: In praise of freestyler Luther’s acolyte & Goethe confidant/prodigy Friedrich Schiller 1759-1805 (died of TB at age 45): The most important aspect of human freedom—the ability to defy one’s animal instincts, such as the drive for self-pr

  4. Pingback: In praise of freestyler Luther’s acolyte & Goethe confidant/prodigy Friedrich Schiller 1759-1805 (died of TB at age 45): The most important aspect of human freedom—the ability to defy one’s animal instincts, such as the drive for self-pr

  5. Pingback: In praise of my mentor June Gutmanis 1925-1998 as disciple of Luther prodigies Goethe/Schiller — and later progeny like Napoleon Hill/Norman Vincent Peale/Stephen R. Covey — on Covey: Every day, we should have some special time to remind ourse

  6. Pingback: In praise of my mentor June Gutmanis 1925-1998 as disciple of Luther prodigies Goethe/Schiller — and later progeny like Napoleon Hill/Norman Vincent Peale/Stephen R. Covey — on Covey: Every day, we should have some special time to remind ourse

  7. Pingback: In praise of my mentor June Gutmanis 1925-1998 as disciple of Luther prodigies Goethe/Schiller — and their later progeny like Napoleon Hill/Norman Vincent Peale/Stephen R. Covey — on Covey: Every day, we should have some special time to remind

  8. Pingback: Toward Christ | Curtis Narimatsu

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s