In praise of freestyler Luther acolyte — the great Goethe: According to Goethe’s devotee Nietzsche, Goethe had “a kind of almost joyous and trusting fatalism” that has “faith that only in the totality everything redeems itself and appears good and justified.”

*

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+faustian+bargain&qpvt=images+faustian+bargain&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=66B29006CAFE911B4D6FB482328794C330ED5930&selectedIndex=4

*

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+mephistopheles&qpvt=images+mephistopheles&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=EB961BF9462B10D88642B1DF7B79D8398AD71BF9&selectedIndex=17

*

Sculptural depiction of Mephistopheles bewitching the students in the scene Auerbachs Keller from Faust at the entrance of today’s pub Auerbachs Keller in Leipzig

*

the great Goethe 1749-1832

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+goethe&qpvt=images+goethe&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=72D5FEF8CDEFB082CA3E64935D9BCBF175998AC1&selectedIndex=13

*

Goethe Monument in Chicago‘s Lincoln Park (1913)

*

*

*

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goethe#Religion_and_politics

*

In the book Conversations with Goethe by Eckermann, Goethe is enthusiastic about Christianity, Jesus, Martin Luther, and the Protestant Reformation, even calling Christianity the “ultimate religion.”  Although he opposed many of the religiosity central rules of the Christian churches , he thought that he could nevertheless be inwardly Christian in spite of “playing church” minuses with religiosity.

*

*

Ralph Waldo Emerson selected Goethe, along with Plato, Napoleon, and William Shakespeare, as one of six “representative men” in his work of the same name.

*

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Representative_Men

*

Representative Men is a collection of seven lectures by Ralph Waldo Emerson, published as a book of essays in 1850. The first essay discusses the role played by “great men” in society, and the remaining six each extoll the virtues of one of six men deemed by Emerson to be great: Plato (“the Philosopher”), Emanuel Swedenborg (“the Mystic”), Michel de Montaigne (“the Skeptic”), William Shakespeare (“the Poet”), Napoleon (“the Man of the World”), and Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (“the Writer”). The work was described by Matthew Arnold as “the most important work done in prose.”

*

*

*

*

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goethe%27s_Faust#Basic_themes

*

Faust is Goethe’s most famous work and considered by many to be one of the greatest works of German literature.

*

Basic themes

Faust does not seek power through knowledge, but access to transcendent knowledge denied to the rational mind. Here Goethe’s mysticism asserts itself clearly along the lines of Biblical Paul (& contempo Paulian Joanne Silva   https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/06/23/tribute-to-jo-anne-silva-deep-calls-to-deep-in-the-roar-of-your-waterfalls-psalms-415-7-the-psalmist-comes-to-see-that-there-is-no-silence-the-answer-coming-from-god-is-deeper-than-words-god/ )  .

*

*

https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/06/20/paul-is-a-mystic-he-thinks-mystically-writes-mystically-teaches-mystically-and-lives-mystically-and-expects-other-christians-to-do-likewise-paul-the-first-writer-in-the-christian-bible/

*

*

In the fourth book of his main work, Schopenhauer praised Goethe’s portrayal of Gretchen and her suffering. In Schopenhauer’s consideration of salvation from suffering, he cited this section of Faust as exemplifying one of the ways to sanctity.

The great Goethe has given us a distinct and visible description of this denial of the will, brought about by great misfortune and by the despair of all deliverance, in his immortal masterpiece Faust, in the story of the sufferings of Gretchen. I know of no other description in poetry. It is a perfect specimen of the second path, which leads to the denial of the will not, like the first, through the mere knowledge of the suffering of the whole world which one acquires voluntarily, but through the excessive pain felt in one’s own person. It is true that many tragedies bring their violently willing heroes ultimately to this point of complete resignation, and then the will-to-live and its phenomenon usually end at the same time. But no description known to me brings to us the essential point of that conversion so distinctly and so free from everything extraneous as the one mentioned in Faust.

The German language has itself been influenced by Goethe’s Faust, particularly by the first part. One example of this is the phrase “des Pudels Kern,” which means the real nature or deeper meaning of something (that was not evident before). The literal translation of “des Pudels Kern” is “the core of the poodle,” and it originates from Faust’s exclamation upon seeing the poodle (which followed him home) turn into Mephistopheles. Another instance originates in the scene wherein Gretchen asks Faust if he is religious. In German, the word “Gretchenfrage” (literally “Gretchen question”) refers to a question aiming at the core of the issue, often forcing the answering person to make a confession or a difficult decision.

*

*

*

*

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faust_Part_One#Synopsis

*

The actual plot begins with a prologue in Heaven, where the Lord challenges Mephistopheles, the Devil, that Mephistopheles cannot lead astray the Lord’s favourite striving scholar, Dr. Faust. We then see Faust in his study, attempting and failing to gain knowledge of nature and the universe by magic means. The dejected Faust contemplates suicide, but is held back by the sounds of the beginning Easter celebrations. He joins his assistant Wagner for an Easter walk in the countryside, among the celebrating people, and is followed home by a poodle. Back in the study, the poodle transforms itself into Mephistopheles, who offers Faust a contract: he will do Faust’s bidding on earth, and Faust will do the same for him in hell (if, as Faust adds in an important side clause, Mephisto can get him to be satisfied and to want a moment to last forever). Faust signs in blood, and Mephisto first takes him to Auerbach’s tavern in Leipzig, where the devil plays tricks on some drunken revellers. Having then been transformed into a young man by a witch, Faust encounters Margaret (Gretchen) and she excites his desires. Through a scheme involving jewelry and Gretchen’s neighbour Marthe, Mephisto brings about Faust’s and Gretchen’s liaison. After a period of separation, Faust seduces Gretchen, who accidentally kills her mother with a sleeping potion Faust had given her. Gretchen is pregnant, and her torment is further increased when Faust and Mephisto kill her enraged brother in a sword fight. Mephisto seeks to distract Faust by taking him to the witches’ sabbath of Walpurgis Night, but Faust insists on rescuing Gretchen from the death sentence she has been given after going insane and drowning her newborn child. In the dungeon, Faust in vain tries to persuade Gretchen to follow him to freedom. At the end of the drama, as Faust and Mephisto flee the dungeon, a voice from heaven announces Gretchen’s salvation.

*

*

*

*

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faust_Part_Two#Act_V

*

The Chorus Mysticus ends the drama:

All that must disappear
Is but a parable;
What lay beyond us, here
All is made visible;
Here deeds have understood
Words they were darkened by;
Eternal Womanhood
Draws us on high.
*
*
*
*
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Wolfgang_von_Goethe#Influence
*
Goethe’s views make him, along with Adam Smith, Thomas Jefferson, and Ludwig van Beethoven, a figure in two worlds: on the one hand, devoted to the sense of taste, order, and finely crafted detail, which is the hallmark of the artistic sense of the Age of Reason and the neo-classical period of architecture; on the other, seeking a personal, intuitive, and personalized form of expression and society, firmly supporting the idea of self-regulating and organic systems. Thinkers such as Ralph Waldo Emerson would take up many similar ideas in the 1800s. Goethe’s ideas on evolution would frame the question that Darwin and Wallace would approach within the scientific paradigm. The Serbian inventor and electrical engineer Nikola Tesla was heavily influenced by Goethe’s Faust, his favorite poem, and had actually memorized the entire text. It was while reciting a certain verse that he was struck with the epiphany that would lead to the idea of the rotating magnetic field and ultimately, alternating current.
*

https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/08/22/nikola-tesla-was-much-more-altruistic-than-nobel-prize-coveter-michio-kaku-who-self-servingly-surrounds-himself-with-nobel-prize-recipients-as-michio-pickbacks-on-others-to-grab-the-nobel-prize-de/

*

https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/07/11/long-forgotten-angelheart-nikola-tesla/

This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

10 Responses to In praise of freestyler Luther acolyte — the great Goethe: According to Goethe’s devotee Nietzsche, Goethe had “a kind of almost joyous and trusting fatalism” that has “faith that only in the totality everything redeems itself and appears good and justified.”

  1. Pingback: In praise of freestyler Luther’s acolyte & Goethe confidant/prodigy Friedrich Schiller 1759-1805 (died of TB at age 45): The most important aspect of human freedom—the ability to defy one’s animal instincts, such as the drive for self-pr

  2. Pingback: In praise of freestyler Luther’s acolyte & Goethe confidant/prodigy Friedrich Schiller 1759-1805 (died of TB at age 45): The most important aspect of human freedom—the ability to defy one’s animal instincts, such as the drive for self-pr

  3. Pingback: In praise of freestyler Luther’s acolyte & Goethe confidant/prodigy Friedrich Schiller 1759-1805 (died of TB at age 45): The most important aspect of human freedom—the ability to defy one’s animal instincts, such as the drive for self-pr

  4. Pingback: In praise of freestyler Luther’s acolyte & Goethe confidant/prodigy Friedrich Schiller 1759-1805 (died of TB at age 45): The most important aspect of human freedom—the ability to defy one’s animal instincts, such as the drive for self-pr

  5. Pingback: In praise of my mentor June Gutmanis 1925-1998 as disciple of Luther prodigies Goethe/Schiller — and later progeny like Napoleon Hill/Norman Vincent Peale/Stephen R. Covey — on Covey: Every day, we should have some special time to remind ourse

  6. Pingback: In praise of my mentor June Gutmanis 1925-1998 as disciple of Luther prodigies Goethe/Schiller — and later progeny like Napoleon Hill/Norman Vincent Peale/Stephen R. Covey — on Covey: Every day, we should have some special time to remind ourse

  7. Pingback: In praise of my mentor June Gutmanis 1925-1998 as disciple of Luther prodigies Goethe/Schiller — and their later progeny like Napoleon Hill/Norman Vincent Peale/Stephen R. Covey — on Covey: Every day, we should have some special time to remind

  8. Pingback: Augustinian mystic Martin Luther — Aquinas cognition John Calvin — and yet, Bertrand Russell & Apostle John are Augustinian & Plato logos (analytical) acolytes — huli ‘au (upside down in Hawaiian), baby!! | Curtis Narimatsu

  9. Pingback: Here we have Augustinian mystic Martin Luther — and Aquinas cognitive John Calvin — and yet, Bertrand Russell & Apostle John are Augustinian & Plato logos (analytical) epic movers — huli ‘au (upside down in Hawaiian), baby!

  10. Pingback: Here we have Augustinian mystic Martin Luther — and Aquinas cognitive John Calvin — and yet, Bertrand Russell & Apostle John are Augustinian & Plato logos (analytical) epic movers — huli ‘au (upside down in Hawaiian), baby!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s