In praise of freestyler Luther’s acolyte & Goethe confidant/prodigy Friedrich Schiller 1759-1805 (died of TB at age 45): The most important aspect of human freedom—the ability to defy one’s animal instincts, such as the drive for self-preservation, when, for example, someone willingly sacrifices oneself for conceptual ideals (e.g. Jesus’ canon “love your neighbor as you love yourself”). My mentor June Gutmanis 1925-1998 is my contempo oeuvre Schillerian

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Lithograph portrait from 1905, captioned “Friedrich von Schiller” in recognition of his 1802 ennoblement

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http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+schiller+friedrich&qpvt=images+schiller+friedrich&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=5EF83D4C2AC5D057460A72AFA90C90901BF619FD&selectedIndex=105

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/07/12/in-praise-of-freestyler-luther-acolyte-the-great-goethe-according-to-goethes-devotee-nietzsche-goethe-had-a-kind-of-almost-joyous-and-trusting-fatalism-that-has-faith-that-only-in-the/

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/07/12/dedicated-to-my-mentor-on-the-15th-annual-anniversary-in-memorium-june-gutmanis-1925-1998-sir-thomas-browne-like-i-wonder-what-a-leakey-200000-years-hence-quite-likely-on-present-trends-of-th/

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Friedrich_Schiller

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During the last seventeen years of his life (1788–1805), Schiller struck up a productive friendship with already famous and influential Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. They frequently discussed issues concerning aesthetics, and Schiller encouraged Goethe to finish works he left as sketches. This relationship and these discussions led to a period now referred to as Weimar Classicism.

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In September 2008, Schiller was voted by the audience of the TV channel Arte as the second most important playwright in Europe after William Shakespeare.

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Dramas  —

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Schiller is considered to be Germany’s most important classical playwright.

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Critics like F.J. Lamport and Eric Auerbach have noted his innovative use of dramatic structure and his creation of new forms, such as the melodrama and the bourgeois tragedy.

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What follows is a brief, chronological description of the plays.

  • The Robbers (Die Räuber): The language of The Robbers is highly emotional, and the depiction of physical violence in the play marks it as a quintessential work of Germany’s RomanticStorm and Stress‘ movement. The Robbers is considered by critics like Peter Brooks to be the first European melodrama. The play pits two brothers against each other in alternating scenes, as one quests for money and power, while the other attempts to create revolutionary anarchy in the Bohemian Forest. The play strongly criticises the hypocrisies of class and religion, and the economic inequities of German society; it also conducts a complicated inquiry into the nature of evil. Schiller was inspired by the play Julius von Tarent by Johann Anton Leisewitz.
  • Fiesco (Die Verschwörung des Fiesco zu Genua):
  • Intrigue and Love (Kabale und Liebe): The aristocratic Ferdinand von Walter wishes to marry Luise Miller, the bourgeois daughter of the city’s music instructor. Court politics involving the duke’s beautiful but conniving mistress Lady Milford and Ferdinand’s ruthless father create a disastrous situation reminiscent of Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. Schiller develops his criticisms of absolutism and bourgeois hypocrisy in this bourgeois tragedy. Act 2, scene 2 is an anti-British parody that depicts a firing-squad massacre. Young Germans who refused to join the Hessians and British to quash the American Revolutionary War are fired upon.
  • Don Carlos: This play marks Schiller’s entrée into historical drama. Very loosely based on the events surrounding the real Don Carlos of Spain, Schiller’s Don Carlos is another republican figure—he attempts to free Flanders from the despotic grip of his father, King Phillip. The Marquis Posa’s famous speech to the king proclaims Schiller’s belief in personal freedom and democracy.
  • The Wallenstein Trilogy: These plays follow the fortunes of the treacherous commander Albrecht von Wallenstein during the Thirty Years’ War.
  • Mary Stuart (Maria Stuart): This “revisionist”  history of the Scottish queen, who was Elizabeth I’s rival, portrays Mary Stuart as a tragic heroine, misunderstood and used by ruthless politicians, including and especially, Elizabeth.
  • The Maid of Orleans (Die Jungfrau von Orleans): about Joan of Arc
  • The Bride of Messina (Die Braut von Messina)
  • William Tell (Wilhelm Tell)
  • Demetrius (unfinished)

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Schiller asserts that it is possible to elevate the moral character of a people, by first touching their souls with beauty, an idea that is also found in his poem Die Künstler (The Artists): “Only through Beauty’s morning-gate, dost thou penetrate the land of knowledge.”

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Herbert Marcuse finds Schiller’s notion of Spieltrieb (solace/peace/comfort)  useful in thinking a social situation without the condition of modern social alienation. He writes, “Schiller’s Letters … aim at remaking of civilization by virtue of the liberating force of the aesthetic function: it is envisaged as containing the possibility of a new reality principle.”

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My mentor June Gutmanis’ ontic/meme as Schiller’s prodigy   —

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“Deeper meaning resides in the fairy tales told to me in my childhood than in any truth that is taught in life.”           

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http://viavienna.wordpress.com/2011/10/08/freedom-and-the-joy-of-eternal-nature/

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“Stay true to the dreams of thy youth.” (Elizabeth, in: Don Carlos)

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“Live with your century but do not be its creature.” (From On the Aesthetic Education of Man)

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weimar_Classicism#Influence

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Weimar Classicism established a new humanism by synthesizing Romantic, classical and Enlightenment ideas. The movement, from 1772 until 1805, concentrated on Goethe and Schiller during the period 1788–1805.

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Influence

Weimar Classicism’s two most notable exponents, Goethe and Schiller, especially influenced later Germans where their works have been read and studied by fellow playwrights, and also philosophers: Hegel, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche. Musicians were inspired to compose for the works of these writers: Mozart, Dukas, Beethoven, Carl Friedrich Zelter. Through the efforts of Scotsman Thomas Carlyle, who translated some of these works and wrote a biography of Schiller, they became more accessible to the English-speaking peoples in the mid-19th Century.

Some of Goethe’s ideas in the Theory of Colours have impacted scientific figures such as Charles Darwin. Goethe’s color spectrum is still used.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weimar

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Weimar’s cultural heritage is vast. It is most often recognised as the place where Germany’s first democratic constitution was signed after the First World War, giving its name to the Weimar Republic period in German politics, of 1918–1933.

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However, the city was also the focal point of the German Enlightenment and home of the leading characters of the literary genre of Weimar Classicism,  the writers Goethe and Schiller.  

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Many places in the city centre have been designated as UNESCO World Heritage sites.

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5 Responses to In praise of freestyler Luther’s acolyte & Goethe confidant/prodigy Friedrich Schiller 1759-1805 (died of TB at age 45): The most important aspect of human freedom—the ability to defy one’s animal instincts, such as the drive for self-preservation, when, for example, someone willingly sacrifices oneself for conceptual ideals (e.g. Jesus’ canon “love your neighbor as you love yourself”). My mentor June Gutmanis 1925-1998 is my contempo oeuvre Schillerian

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