Augustinian & Dante prodigy Blaise Pascal 1623-1662 — Pascal’s Wager: Voltaire’s critique concerns not at all the character of Pascalian wager as God`s existence proof, but the fact that the very beliefs Pascal tries to promote are not at all believable and convincing (Voltaire hints to the fact that Pascal, as a catholic jansenist, believed the doctrine that only a small – and already predestined – portion of humanity will eventually be saved by his Christian God). In this context Voltaire explains that no matter how far someone is tempted with rewards in order to believe such a Christian creed of salvation and such a god, the results will be at best a faint belief.

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http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+pascal’s+wager&qpvt=images+pascal%27s+wager&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=F3CD4A33D565F61B2748E6D64321000F4DC6A42E&selectedIndex=7

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pascal%27s_Wager#Failure_as_proof

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Pascal’s Wager is an argument in apologetic philosophy which was devised by the seventeenth-century French philosopher, mathematician, and physicist, Blaise Pascal.

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It posits that humans all bet with their lives either that God exists or does not exist.

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Given the possibility that God actually does exist and assuming the infinite gain or loss associated with belief in God or with unbelief, a rational person should live as though God exists and seek to believe in God.

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If God does not actually exist, such a person will have only a finite loss (some pleasures, luxury, etc.).

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Pascal formulated the wager within a Christian framework.

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Historically, Pascal’s Wager was groundbreaking because it charted new territory in probability theory, marked the first formal use of decision theory, and anticipated future philosophies such as existentialism, pragmatism, and voluntarism.

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Criticism of Pascal’s Wager began in his own day, and came from both staunch atheists (who question the ‘benefits’ of a deity whose ‘realm’ is beyond reason), and the religiously orthodox (who primarily take issue with the wager’s deistic and agnostic language). It is criticized for not proving God’s existence, encouragement of false belief and the problem of which religion and which God should be worshipped.

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3 Responses to Augustinian & Dante prodigy Blaise Pascal 1623-1662 — Pascal’s Wager: Voltaire’s critique concerns not at all the character of Pascalian wager as God`s existence proof, but the fact that the very beliefs Pascal tries to promote are not at all believable and convincing (Voltaire hints to the fact that Pascal, as a catholic jansenist, believed the doctrine that only a small – and already predestined – portion of humanity will eventually be saved by his Christian God). In this context Voltaire explains that no matter how far someone is tempted with rewards in order to believe such a Christian creed of salvation and such a god, the results will be at best a faint belief.

  1. Pingback: Augustinian mystic Martin Luther — Aquinas cognition John Calvin — and yet, Bertrand Russell & Apostle John are Augustinian & Plato logos (analytical) acolytes — huli ‘au (upside down in Hawaiian), baby!! | Curtis Narimatsu

  2. Pingback: Here we have Augustinian mystic Martin Luther — and Aquinas cognitive John Calvin — and yet, Bertrand Russell & Apostle John are Augustinian & Plato logos (analytical) epic movers — huli ‘au (upside down in Hawaiian), baby!

  3. Pingback: Here we have Augustinian mystic Martin Luther — and Aquinas cognitive John Calvin — and yet, Bertrand Russell & Apostle John are Augustinian & Plato logos (analytical) epic movers — huli ‘au (upside down in Hawaiian), baby!

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