In Falling Upward, Father Richard Rohr seeks to help readers understand the tasks of the two halves of life and to show them that those who have fallen, failed, or “gone down” are the only ones who understand “up.” Most of us tend to think of the second half of life as largely about getting old, dealing with health issues, and letting go of life, but the whole thesis of this book is exactly the opposite. What looks like falling down can largely be experienced as “falling upward.” In fact, it is not a loss but somehow actually a gain, as we have all seen with elders who have come to their fullness.

*

*

*

http://www.amazon.com/Falling-Upward-Spirituality-Halves-Life/dp/0470907754/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1375993398&sr=1-1&keywords=Richard Rohr&tag=viglink129378-20

*

  • Explains why the second half of life can and should be full of spiritual richness
  • Offers a new view of how spiritual growth happens?loss is gain
  • Richard. Rohr is a regular contributing writer for Sojourners and Tikkun magazines

This important book explores the counterintuitive message that we grow spiritually much more by doing wrong than by doing right–a fresh way of thinking about spirituality that grows throughout life.

*

*

*

http://www.patheos.com/blogs/jameswellman/2013/08/ten-ways-meaning-helps-us/

by James Wellman

*

Become an elder. No person has taught me more about this than Richard Rohr. Rohr is a Franciscan monk who is on the outs with his church, just the kind of priest for me! His recent book, Falling Upwards: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life is beautiful, profound, and nearly every sentence is spot on. Our culture more than ever needs people of wisdom, who, as Rohr shares, embody a “bright sadness.” They know suffering but they also have lived through it, and feel the divine joy of love that moves through suffering with and for others.

*

Enjoy paradox. Life is full of these “problems.” I used to think you could solve these contradictions: liberty and law, freedom and discipline, toughness and tenderness, letter and spirit, boldness and gentleness, mourning and laughter, judgment and grace—we always want one side or the other but it’s always both. Jesus said, “Those who lose their life, will find their life.” Add that paradox to the manual of how to live a meaningful life.

*

Teenagers are terrific. Too many parents say to me, “Well, when our kids get to be teenagers, it’s all over.” I feel the opposite. I thought my kids were and are far more interesting as teens than as children. And they need and have needed us a lot more. Parents should pay a lot more attention to their children as teenagers; this is the most critical time in life. And when you have a good relationship with your teens it is deeply satisfying.

*

*

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s