In praise of the 46th anniversary of McCartney’s tune “I Will”

 

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http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+true+love&qpvt=images+true+love&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=4048FA8F6A0A10C912E3C14BC29E4A692D3D011C&selectedIndex=12

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BGd5y-zWV0A

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and 50 years ago today   (listen to the way this special artist gets into the song)  —

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JSvF52SQhOE&feature=related

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http://www.reviewjournal.com/columns-blogs/steven-kalas/verse-chorus-verse-lifetime-feelings-traversed

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Do you have a favorite song? Oh, the world is filled with such beautiful and varied music.

But, is there one tune that has reached out to your soul in some definitive imprint? A song that grabbed a time and place and etched itself into the fabric of your psyche? Or, if not a time and place, perhaps a song that spoke melodically, rhythmically or lyrically to your hopes, your worldview, your values or your personality in a way that will never let you go?

Is there a song about which you could say, “If you want to know something very special and intimate about my history, my passions, my ideals and dreams, then put on these headphones, push the ‘play’ button, close your eyes and listen carefully. Then we’ll talk.”

Often favorite songs are attached to memories of time, place, people and experience. We hear the intro guitar riff, perhaps the drums, the strings, the horns or the a cappella vocals, and it’s like walking through the portal of a time machine. In the blink of an eye we are transported back … back … and we are somehow standing in a memory that is alive and vibrant.

Great love affairs almost always come with a portfolio of music. Ask any thriving, happy, healthy couple and they will remember that song that is their song. The tune that takes them back to the time of falling in love when everything sparkled with acute emotional clarity. When the bond was being forged in a white hot crucible of mystery, wonder and joy.

Some songs take you back to childhood. The other day I played Jack Jones singing “Lady” (circa 1960s) and I could practically smell the house of my youth. My mother loved that guy’s music. She would play that and other favorites really loud while we cleaned house on Saturday morning.

Times of great loss, times of ecstatic celebration, times of innocence — somehow we cross-reference the catalog of memories with a song that will forever mark that page in the story of our lives.

Some songs stand out of time. They just make you happy and alive. When I hear that cowbell, naked and alone, start to count out the intro to the Rolling Stones “Honky Tonk Woman,” my blood starts to boil. I don’t know why. The lyrics really don’t matter to me.

I collapse into Keith Richards’ Fender Telecaster and the gutty, primal, nasty-ass guitar phrases that relentlessly chase and answer each of Mick Jagger’s vocal lines. Do you have a favorite?

My favorite makes me blush. It is utter innocence. It makes me feel eerily vulnerable. At once utterly happy and utterly ridiculous.

The chord progression is supernatural. Unexpected and counterintuitive. Had the song’s composer been so unlucky as to have had formal musical training, I doubt if the song could have ever been written. Because it breaks all the rules.

The song has no chorus. No obvious bridge section. Just an intro, never repeated, followed by verses. For you musician junkies, the song begins with an E-flat minor chord, and ends with D major. Raising the question, how do you start a song in the key of D-flat major and end that song in the key of D major? Answer: Your name is John Lennon, and you’re a savant. And besides, you don’t care about the rules.

John sings the lead intro. But then something shocking happens. The melody John writes for the main section is out of his vocal range. Too high. So, in midsong, John hands the lead vocal over to Paul McCartney, a natural tenor. John heads below with a hypnotic, often monotone low harmony that rearranges marrow in your bones. The “roads” of these two vocal lines continually converge and diverge, sometimes singing in unison and sometimes separating into harmony.

“If I fell in love with you/ Would you promise to be true/ And help me understand/ Because I’ve been in love before/ And I found that love was more/ Than just holding hands.”

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The Beatles released “If I Fell” in 1964.

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I was 7. I played that song over and over on what we geezers once called “the hi-fi.”

Some 40 years later, when I studied personality theory, I learned my personality carried the nickname “The Tragic Romantic” (see the Enneagram). That my “type” is known for its vain fantasizing about a love that will rescue me from my own existential alienation.

There is no such love of course, and it is wrong and destructive to proffer that expectation to any mortal woman. But still … the longing.

What is your favorite song? And why?

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http://www.reviewjournal.com/columns-blogs/steven-kalas/music-power-submit-sound

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the joy and power of music, the way it captures and catalogs times and places in our lives.

A deluge ensued. I got emails. I got phone calls. It made me smile. I was happy that people seemed to so enjoy describing how particular compositions had etched themselves into the granite wall of memory — good and bad.

One reader described a lifelong love affair with Italian composer Antonio Vivaldi’s “Four Seasons”: “I still can sit — eyes closed and headphones on — and sit raptured listening to that man move through sun, wind, clouds and rain as if he had actually been there, floating out-of-body in the stratosphere.”

Wow, ma’am. You should consider a writing career.

She lamented our modern day wherein it seems fewer and fewer people appreciate classical music. I share her lament.

Another reader picked up a baton from my column and ran with it. He remembered a song affixed tightly to his mother: “Since you mentioned your mother, I (think of) a song that reminds me of my mother (she’s still around thankfully) — ‘Total Eclipse of the Heart.’ She liked that song a lot when I was a kid, and I grew to like that song. It’s a powerful song. And I will always remember my mother as she was at that point in my life. Happy Mother’s Day!”

Scores of folks remembered songs attached to their experience of great love. That particular song by which they danced at their wedding reception. A song oozing from the radio at the moment of their first kiss. A song they made love to. One reader offered up a song that had emerged later in her marriage and perfectly captured the whole of the enduring journey:

“ ‘Remember When’ by Alan Jackson. It is a culmination of who we have been and are, as each verse progresses a couple through the joy, the heartbreak and a return to that joy, stronger and better for all they have shared. It makes the world around me stop and rends my heart every time.”

One reader questioned my statement that it is wrong and destructive to ask a mortal to rescue us from our own existential alienation: “Why not have the expectation of meeting a mortal who would love that part of your type? I don’t believe you believe it to be wrong or destructive to proffer up such hopes.”

The question misunderstands what I was trying to say. Indeed there is nothing wrong with hoping to have a life partner who loves your type — its genius and its burdens. That someone would understand us and love us. But, simultaneously,

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our mate should expect us to take radical responsibility for the shadow/egotistic side of our type.

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It’s one thing to understand the foible of personality type, even to hold it dear. But that does not mean we grant license to our egotistic/shadow side.

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Every human being experiences existential alienation. And probably everyone in some fashion leans unduly and unfairly on love relationships to resolve that alienation.

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All I was saying is that my type (Enneagram 4) is known for especially pernicious attempts to expect and demand to be rescued.

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Makes me think of Dan Fogelberg’s lyric:

“I had this woman who gave me her soul/ But I wasn’t ready to take it/ Her heart was so fragile and heavy to hold/ And I was afraid I might break it.”

It is perfectly fine, right and proper to expect your beloved to hold your heart in safety, respect and security. To understand you. To accept you. But it is too much to ask any mortal to do for us what only God can do.

Then, the voice mail from the 68-year-old man, married 47 years:

“I came from a broken home. My parents didn’t love me. I grew up in foster homes. I went to church. My favorite song is ‘Jesus Loves Me.’ (Because) I always knew if somebody loved me, then life was worth it. If all young people would know that they can overcome the odds like I did!

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You just have to grab something that’s bigger than you.

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Then there’s the song ‘Did You Ever Know That You’re My Hero.’ Between Jesus and my wife, they are my heroes. Because they both love me.”

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Wow!

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A  bridge from abandonment and brokenness to wholeness and freedom.

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My readers rock.

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Taz Vegas   —   Good Day     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zIee2iChvaY

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Sammy Johnson   —  Hey

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Imua Garza    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imua_Garza

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pop/rock musical history –

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/06/15/musica-amore-so-whos-lovin-you-baby-in-praise-of-smokey-robinsons-53-yr-old-classic-as-sung-by-none-other-than-our-salt-of-the-earth-lifes-most-enthralling-vocalists-ahsan/

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music history highlights –

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/11/14/tribute-to-my-musical-dad-toshi-1913-1998-george-trices-passion-personality-analog-my-dad/

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2014/04/06/in-praise-of-the-60th-anniversary-of-sweet-song-teardrops-are-falling/

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2014/04/03/in-praise-of-boogie-diva-dona-oxford-her-coverredux-of-charles-albertines-62-yr-old-tune-bandstand-boogie/

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2014/04/02/redux-the-83rd-anniversary-of-beautiful-melody-love-letters-in-the-sand/

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2014/03/21/in-praise-of-hidden-fine-baritonedancer-bo-diddley-1928-2008-his-5-accent-clave-rhythm-road-runner-55-yrs-ago/

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2014/03/19/but-now-theres-nowhere-to-hide-since-you-pushed-my-love-aside-my-head-is-saying-fool-forget-her-my-heart-is-saying-dont-let-go-hold-on-to-the-end-thats-what-i-intend-to-do/

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2014/03/15/ouvre-nearly-half-a-century-of-deepest-passion-i-can-see-it-in-your-eyes-that-you-despise-the-same-old-lines-you-heard-the-night-before-and-though-its-just-a-line-to-you-for-me-its-true-a/

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2014/03/07/in-memoriam-great-rock-vocalist-steve-lee-of-switzerland-1963-2010-died-as-victim-of-highway-mishap-mooalii-succession-of-great-exemplars-with-steve-lee-following-in-footsteps-of-genes/

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/09/06/musica-amore-celebrate-77-years-of-great-vocalistpianist-mickey-gilley/

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2014/01/03/in-memoriam-mary-la-roche-1920-1999-15-years-gone-but-not-forgotten-actress-who-evoked-great-sensuality-compassion/

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/12/29/midnight-special/

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2014/01/15/linda-ronstadt-rock-hall-of-fame-2014/

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/12/07/great-pianist-matthew-lee-born-1982-will-be-34-a-month-from-now-i-can-help-baby-redux-billy-swans-tune-40-yrs-ago/

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2014/01/11/beyonce-the-game-changer-randall-roberts/

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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/03/20/nun-italy-the-voice_n_5002937.html?utm_hp_ref=mostpopular

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And in praise of Bruno Mars, and r.i.p. to Bruno’s dearest mother    —

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AHDtXqjgEj4

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bruno_Mars#1985.E2.80.932003:_Early_life_and_musical_beginnings

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Always   — hold on tight to your dreams, baby!!    (Jeff Lynne’s ELO on the 33rd anniversary of this great song)     

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aPywHBE1AWI

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go to timeclock 3:40       —

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corny zany singing which works very well   —

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kU4JVXCCmMA&feature=related

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& in praise of its featured dancers,  (hotel maids) Lucha Palacios & Hortensia Clavijo  —

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CQZpKRTwWqo

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resonant bass & piano licks   —

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if introvert Karen Carpenter had just stayed in the background playing her favorite drums, she might still be with us today      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xqHKBh75onQ

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the mind-blowing though lesser talented versions of a liberated Karen Carpenter   —

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fine rock-a-billy licks    —

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here is the handsomest you will see Elvis at   — timeclock 34:25

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the live filming above is even better than this shot   –

Presley, wearing a tight black leather jacket with Napoleonic standing collar, black leather wristbands, and black leather pants, holds a microphone with a long cord. His hair, which looks black as well, falls across his forehead. In front of him is an empty microphone stand. Behind, beginning below stage level and rising up, audience members watch him. A young woman with long black hair in the front row gazes up ecstatically.

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Elvis’ alter ego/hall of fame guitarist Scotty Moore — I guess when you’re 80 yrs. old, “ain’t not” much fun anymore to be on stage   — nonetheless, wonderful soul Moore is ever the good sport   — go to timeclock 16:54 here video #1   — all-star ensemble

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a beautiful Sedaka voice     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WlE_qqfp5Yo

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Oh darling,     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SKhPGLF1vAI         https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3KJlrZguMqQ

no, my name is Bocephus        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JLYFL3X6HC8

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I’ll see you in my dreams, baby!!

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go to timeclock  :45     here   —   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oFCl8nCzcmc

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Nick Pitera’s tenor   —    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rZb6eFSBXiU            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rZb6eFSBXiU

Mariah’s the real deal    —

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Travel with the band    —

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John Denver was meticulous in his ensemble’s performance   —

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nice piano boogie  (forget Jagger’s banal vocal)   —

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and boogie’s history via Jools Holland    —

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Turk

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TX_qh4sHVkc       (go to timeclock 1:20 Commander Cody’s band)

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Marvin Gaye’s rhythmic beat    —

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as is McCartney’s    —

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boogie       https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SQLhORPoUJs

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charismatic Robin Zander

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EyW1p7SpYW8&list=RDydJzyg4tS1M&index=28      (go to timeclock 1:30)

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_XilYSDYH-0     (Lennon the blue-z evoker)

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Rest in peace,  Three Dog Night’s vocalist on Try A Little Tenderness  — Cory Wells 1941-2015

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heart-rendering love   —

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hilarious banter   —

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timeclock    :55  and  4:34    (fine bass/piano)

 

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progressing toward positive results (heterogeneity)   —

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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/04/08/don-mclean-american-pie_n_7024486.html?cps=gravity_2444_-3784257060051751948
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Don McLean’s manuscript for “American Pie” went up for auction at Christie’s on Tuesday and sold for $1.2 million, and though he’s never really spoken publicly about the song’s cryptic meaning, he somewhat spilled the beans in the auction house’s catalog.

“Basically, in ‘American Pie’ things are heading in the wrong direction,” McLean said in the interview. “It is becoming less ideal, less idyllic. I don’t know whether you consider that wrong or right, but it is a morality song in a sense. I was around in 1970 and now I am around in 2015 … there is no poetry and very little romance in anything anymore, so it is really like the last phase of ‘American Pie.'”

McLean has been cagey about the song for decades, but has always insisted that “American Pie” was inspired by musicians Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and J.P “The Big Bopper” Richardson, who died in a tragic plane crash on Feb. 3, 1959. It became known as “the day the music died.” But McLean never explained the song’s 800-plus words, which he wrote 13 years after the accident. “That song didn’t just happen,” McLean had said in 1982. “It grew out of my experiences. ‘American Pie’ was part of my process of self-awakening; a mystical trip into my past.”

In the recent Christie’s interview, he now calls the track “an indescribable photograph of America that I tried to capture in words and music.”

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fine blues riff for the first 10 seconds of this song    —

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only in dreams    — go to timeclock 2:28

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5 Responses to In praise of the 46th anniversary of McCartney’s tune “I Will”

  1. Pingback: Nobody comes to therapy who hasn’t lost something. The heart is injured. Limping. Constrained by psychic adhesions. Aching, either obviously or just behind the curtain of consciousness. The therapeutic relationship is the MRI. It reveals what’s torn.

  2. Pingback: To love and to be loved are mystical desires a la Carl Jung’s archetypes (Jung’s forebearers were mystics Plato, Apostle Paul, & Augustine) | Curtis Narimatsu

  3. barbara haar says:

    Hello Curtis, i hope you are well. Jerry and I send our best and hope you and your friends and family are safe and have ample supply of food and water to sit out storm(s). Thinking about you. Barbara and Jerry

  4. Pingback: The young man with terminal cancer was going to die quicker than he thought, and he was very depressed about this. And of course he hadn’t gotten to make his mark, and he had this conversation with this young woman. And the young woman said, “No,

  5. Pingback: Music: A bridge from abandonment and brokenness to wholeness and freedom | Curtis Narimatsu

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