New Testament external prompts correlate with the convergence of the human and holy spirit and the sacred items in the Ark of the Covenant

 

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Overall integration of New Testament prompts

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and coalescence via human and holy spirit

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and prefiguration (predict the coming of Jesus) in the Ark of the Covenant

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New Testament “external” impressions consist of 4  prompts:   1) baptism  2)  Lord’s table  3)  breaking bread at the Lord’s table  4) sipping wine at the Lord’s table.

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Not “cutting genealogy” (breaking generational curses) as several ethnic Hawaiian pastors exhort, nor sealing via Revelation 7:3  (“Do not harm the land or the sea or the trees until we put a seal on the foreheads of the servants of our God”).

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The New Testament prompts not only correlate with the Old Testament tablets of stone (e.g.  first prompt of baptism & the coming of Jesus)   —  the New Testament prompts also correspond with the convergence of the human and holy spirit.

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Our regenerated spirit (our human and holy spirit are inseparable & fluid)  has 1)  intuition, 2) fellowship, and 3) conscience.     

http://www.ministrysamples.org/excerpts/THE-THREE-PARTS-OF-THE-SPIRIT-CONSCIENCE-FELLOWSHIP-AND-INTUITION.HTML

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Just as Jesus ended for us the self/soul (soul consists of mind/will/emotion) at Gethsemane — “not my will, but Thy Will (God’s Will) be done”  — and just as Jesus ended for us the flesh (carnal lust for sex/fame/fortune) the next day at Calvary (Crucifixion),  so does the Lord’s table exemplify our spirit’s commitment to Christ via our spiritual intuition.

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And so does the breaking of the bread exemplify our collective spiritual fellowship in the body of Christ in one accord (a new life in Christ).

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And so does the sipping of the wine exemplify our spiritual conscience in choosing good over evil, no matter the cost of discipleship (crucify our sinful ways to be born in the spirit of Christ).

http://www.ministrysamples.org/excerpts/DENYING-THE-SELF-BY-DENYING-THE-NATURAL-MIND-EMOTION-AND-WILL.HTML

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eucharist
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And just as the Mercy seat during Yom Kippur was a prefiguration (prophecy) of the Passion of Christ  — a greater atonement — the New Covenant (Hebrews 9:3-15) —   a shadow of things to come (Hebrews 10:1)  — predicting the coming of Christ      —–

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so do the three items in the Ark of the Covenant exemplify the Holy Spirit and the prompts –

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the Torah Scroll juxtaposes with intuition and the Lord’s table;

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the manna juxtaposes with fellowship and the breaking of the bread;

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and Aaron’s rod juxtaposes with conscience and the sipping of the wine.

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Understandably, our spiritual intuition, fellowship, & conscience are inseparable, just as the convergence of our human & holy spirit consists as fluid in one broth, so to speak.

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And like the older Biblical Jacob  —    Pastors Wilfredo Agngaray, Cathy Poai Simmons, & Robert Gomes  –

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1)  shake off the dust (do not react in the flesh or of the self) of “the world,” so to speak,

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2) and empathize with adversaries, if there by any, by praying  for their imperviousness to afflictions.

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I am indebted to immense disciples of Jesus   — Bruce & Isa (pronounced “Eesa”) Sakamoto of the Church in Hilo, along with their prodigy & scholar Daniel Tavares– for their inspiration and fellowship  — 

http://churchinhilo.org/index.html

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Jacob’s ladder

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is the human soul and the angels are God’s logoi (messengers),

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1)  pulling up the soul in distress (release from suffering)  — “shake off the dust”  — don’t overreact –

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2)  and descending in compassion (empathize/pray for adversaries).

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#2 above is characterized as “praying down heaven” to earth.   Smith Wigglesworth was a man who knew how to “pray down” heaven. He understood the powers available from above and knew how to bring those powers into this realm.   Pastor Cathy Poai Simmons especially is inspired by Smith Wigglesworth.    Angel Dust  Leilani Well imbued us all in “Martin Luther tabletalk” (Pastor Cathy’s ministry) with “praying down heaven.”

http://www.sermoncentral.com/sermons/praying-heaven-down-dan-anderson-sermon-on-prayer-adoration-96978.asp

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This thought comes from the Lords Prayer. When the disciples asked Jesus how to pray, He responded, “May your kingdom come, your will be done on earth as it is in heaven.” [Matthew 6:10] Or basically, we are to pray in faith: As it is in heaven, may it be that way now – on earth!      

http://www.pastorericdykstra.com/eric_offstage/2013/05/praying-heaven-down-pastor-eric-dykstra-the-crossing-church-elk-river-mn.html

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If only You would tear the heavens open [and] come down, so that mountains would quake at Your presence…”     Isaiah 64:1-3

http://mountain-top-musings.blogspot.com/2012/07/praying-heaven-down.html

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacob%27s_Ladder#Judaism

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Jacob’s Dream by William Blake (c. 1805, British Museum, London)

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Segment above is in my article here      —

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2014/03/28/luck-of-the-draw-bad-or-good-forgive-yourself-for-what-is-not-in-your-power-to-do-steven-kalas/    (in praise of Pastor Cathy Poai Simmons)

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http://www.reviewjournal.com/columns-blogs/steven-kalas/embrace-rebirth-epiphany

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Praying down heaven

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 is outside-in.

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You zero in on a frequency.

“I’ve had an epiphany,” you say. And then, “I’m not exactly sure what’s happening to me.”

You got that right, good man. Something is happening to you. That is, this is nothing you’re doing, nothing you’re deciding. This is outside-in.

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Incredulity is the right response to an epiphany. Incredulity is the wonderful, delicious (and awkward, frightening and uncomfortable) moment when everything you think you know and think you believe slams into a Deeper Reality. A Deeper Truth. And there, suddenly, you “get” that you don’t know anything much at all.

You feel like a naked newborn, squalling helpless into the night.

It’s time to see the star again/ To ponder whether anything is changing/ To give this life a chance again/ To open up a window for the soul/ And just like this time last year/ That same star will turn and say/ Will you bring your gift to the birth of love/ Or just turn and walk away.

An epiphany is an in-breaking. No one knows why or how they happen. Or why they don’t. Or maybe epiphanies are always happening, always around us. In which case no one knows why or how they are suddenly recognized and acted upon. Or recognized and refused. Or never recognized.

Epiphany experiences are and will remain a mystery. Which is part of why epiphanies are so utterly cool when they happen to you. Or when, like me today in this office, you get to be an audience to an epiphany rippling through someone else.

For Christians, Epiphany is a liturgical feast day (Jan. 6, although the date varies in some churches), recalling and retelling the story of a star beckoning three astrologers (the Magi) to the birth of Jesus. This epiphany was a cosmic in-breaking, recognized and acted upon by “Three Wise Men.” They followed the star. They were obedient to the signs and energies inviting them forward into a new life. A new understanding of themselves and the world.

Every now and then a star shines brightly/ And hovers over a new chance to live life differently/ Born today is an outrageous possibility/ What we if were loved, and darkness was redeemed/ Maybe then we wouldn’t have to clutch and grab at things/ Maybe then we could embrace our joys and sufferings/ Do we dare believe that love created everything/ ’Tis the season to go wandering after the star.”

But epiphany experiences are not the sole property of religion or religious people. The “secular” definition doesn’t change the power of the reality: “a sudden, intuitive perception of or insight into the reality or essential meaning of something, usually initiated by some simple, homely, or commonplace occurrence or experience.” (The Oxford English Dictionary)

Epiphany experiences are about birth all right — our birth! And rebirth! Again and again life presents the invitation to burn down our limiting, inauthentic, not-so-useful, not-so-lovely and sometimes really unhappy, unpleasant or even destructive ways of being in exchange for a new vision of self and the world.

A better vision.

I tell the man he reminds me of Ebenezer Scrooge who, after an epiphany of three dreams, is standing in his pajamas on a snow- crusted balcony, tossing money over into the street, giggling and dumbstruck, like a man bailing water out of a foundering boat.

Like an innocent child.

Incredulity is the first response to epiphany. Gratitude should be the next. Thirdly, action! Go. Do. Redeem your past self now with every breath, word and deed.

It’s time to see the star again.

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The value of the Old Testament includes not just the representation of Jesus  — but also of the expectation of long suffering  (perseverance of the saints)     —

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http://www.patheos.com/blogs/peterenns/2014/12/well-at-least-the-old-testament-has-one-thing-going-for-it/

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The sense of God’s absence, that anyone who has been a Christian for more than 45 minutes can attest to, finds its biblical echo the Old Testament, not in the New Testament.

The NT, after all, tells the “end” of Israel’s story–in the sense that “this is where the story of Israel winds up.” The purpose of the NT is not to raise the specter of God’s abandonment but the trumpet call of God’s triumph for Israel and all the world.

But in my experience, this is precisely the problem for people who don’t feel triumphant.

If all we read is the NT, we are left with a sense that, however difficult things may be at the moment, stick with it: Jesus has come and he is coming back very soon.

There is no articulation on the part of NT ForTheBibleTellsMeSowriters of the deep sense of God’s absence that we find among the OT writers, who are there over the long haul, day in and day out, waiting for God to show up and stick to his own plan.

If all we read is the NT and we are also living though a period of God’s absence, abandonment, a period of doubt, a dark night of the soul, we may likely conclude that there is something very wrong with us for feeling this way.

If we don’t walk around in more or less a state of perpetual triumph and spiritual “victory” we will think we are some lower form of life, further down the ladder of spiritual maturity.

This is why we need to hear the experiences of the ancient Israelites to relieve us of our spiritual shame.

Their experiences are very much like ours today: life is hard, and life of faith does not automatically make it easier. It may actually make it harder at times.

Spiritual struggles are normal for Christians. They are not to be sought after, but they are normal. They are not to be romanticized, but they are normal. They are not to be shown off and bragged over, but they are normal.

To speak otherwise is to ignore the counter testimony. The Bible tells me so–and I’m glad it does.

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The earthly tabernacle was patterned after the one in heaven (Exodus 25:9, 40; 26:30; 27:8; Numbers 8:4; Acts 7:44; Hebrews 8:1-5; 9:11-12)

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Spiritual gifts, including the miraculous, 1 Corinthians 12:4-11, 12:27-31, Romans 12:3-8, Ephesians 4:7-16 — impress (via the holy spirit) today, such as one sees with Cliff Livermore when he is not in self/flesh.   Pastor Cathy Poai Simmons’ fruit of the Spirit (transformation & sanctification) manifests her spiritual character of love, not of her nor Cliff as a gifted (purified/holy) disciple, but of the glorious building up of the collective body of Christ. 

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http://www.abideinchrist.com/messages/ex25v22.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deliverance_ministry

http://www.sermoncentral.com/sermons/when-a-seat-of-mercy-becomes-a-throne-of-grace-everett-mccoy-sermon-on-grace-124553.asp?Page=2

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God interfaces sinful man with Jesus at the Tabernacle’s Mercy Seat.    The Shekinah glory shows God’s presence between the cherubim over the cover of the Mercy Seat.    Sin separates man from God. A holy God shuts out sinful man from the Mercy Seat by walls and the veils. Our sins shut out us from the presence of a thrice holy God.   When the sinner could not go to heaven because of his coming short of the glory of God, God in the person of His Son came from heaven to earth “that He might bring us to God.” (1 Peter 3:18)  God issues an invitation for each of us eventually to “draw near with confidence to the Throne of Grace,” so that we may complete via mercy (Mercy Seat) from Jesus and grace to help in time of need. (Hebrews 4:16)   Let’s “keep on drawing near(er)” with confidence to the places and times where God meets us in Christ.    We come now to the Mercy Seat (for eventual salvation), to draw nearer to Jesus’ Throne of Grace.   

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Essentially, Jesus’ Mercy Seat for us and Jesus’ Throne of Grace contrast God’s relationship with man in the Old and New Covenants. When God set up residence on earth, He called His throne the Mercy Seat (for us all).   After Calvary Jesus prompted man via the Holy Spirit to Jesus’ Throne of Grace.  

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In the ark we saw the person of Christ, but in the Mercy Seat we see the work of Christ.   In the Throne of Grace we see the fulfillment of Christ in us.

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God has revealed His heart to us by the name of His throne.  Man comes frighteningly to the Judgment Seat, and finds the Mercy Seat, though Judgment eventually awaits us all.

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Jesus’ Mercy Seat is a place we go to and not be condemned. And this is wonderful. Yet God has so much more for us. By way of Jesus, God’s throne is now called the Throne of Grace.  Not only will He forgive (Mercy), or not give you what you do deserve (destruction)  —  His intent is to bless, or give you what you do not deserve (Grace)!

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Segment above is in articles here    —

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2014/03/28/luck-of-the-draw-bad-or-good-forgive-yourself-for-what-is-not-in-your-power-to-do-steven-kalas/ (in praise of Pastor Cathy Poai Simmons)

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2014/03/28/1-peter-48-love-covers-a-multitude-of-sins-center-of-grace-or-in-the-secular-sense-forgive-yourself-for-what-is-not-in-your-power-to-do/    (tribute to Pastor Wilfredo Agngaray)

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https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2014/03/27/in-praise-of-christian-missioner-kolina-ana/(testimonial to Pastor Robert Gomes)

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Coming of Christ in the Ark of the Covenant      —

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Three items in the Ark of the Covenant also exemplify the Holy Spirit  –

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Besides the Tablets of Stone  (predictive of the coming of Jesus

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Tablets of Stone – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia  

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Throne#Christian_Bible

Gospel of Luke (1:32-33):  “He will be great, and will be called the Son of the Highest; and the LordGod will give Him the throne of His father David. And He will reign over the house of Jacob forever, and of His kingdom there will be no end.”  )

image
Tablets of Stone – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Tablets of Stone, Stone Tablets, Tablets of Law, or Tablets of Testimony (in Hebrew: לוחות הברית Luchot HaBrit – “the tablets [of] the covenant”) in the Bible, …
Preview by Yahoo
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(The Epistle to the Hebrews recounts the description of the Ark, Holy of Holies, and mercy seat (seat of grace), and then goes on to portray the role of the mercy seat during Yom Kippur as a prefiguration of the Passion of Christ, which it argues was a greater atonement, and formed a New Covenant (Hebrews 9:3-15);

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the text continues by stating that the Yom Kippur ritual was merely a shadow of things to come (Hebrews 10:1).

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The continual sacrifice for sin became obsolete once Jesus had died. This is the whole thrust of Hebrews ch 10, but is especially clearly stated in v11-14. The Epistle to the Romans states that Jesus was sent by God as a propitiation (Romans 3:25), while, perhaps in a reflection on Ezekiel’s atonement ceremony, the Second Epistle to the Corinthians argues that Jesus had become a sin offering (2 Corinthians 5:21).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mercy_seat#In_the_New_Testament
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Propitiation#Propitiation_and_expiation  )
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the Ark of the Covenant contained   1)  Aaron’s rod,    2)  the first Torah scroll as written by Moses,  and  3)  a jar of manna.

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With our regeneration (& eventual transformation) in the Holy Spirit

(inseparable from the human spirit below, and the same as the raw spirit of the Holy in the Old Testament),

we have 1) conscience, 2) intuition, and 3) fellowship.

http://www.ministrysamples.org/excerpts/THE-THREE-PARTS-OF-THE-SPIRIT-CONSCIENCE-FELLOWSHIP-AND-INTUITION.HTML
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Conscience, like Aaron’s rod (typology-prefiguration-predictive relationship of the Old Testament to the New Testament — literal horizontal beam of the Cross  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aaron%27s_rod#Christian_use),  is for us to discern right from wrong, to justify or to condemn. Romans 9:1 compared with Romans 8:16 proves that the conscience is a part of our spirit   —      eternal security should never be presented merely as a matter of being once saved, always saved — with no regard for what you believe or do. The writer of Hebrews 12:14 states frankly that only those who continue living holy lives will enter the Lord’s presence.  

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_F._MacArthur#Soteriology

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Intuition, like the Torah scroll http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sefer_Torah,  means to have a direct sense or feeling in our spirit, regardless of reason or circumstance. First Corinthians 2:11 indicates that our spirit can know what our soul cannot. Our soul knows by reason or by circumstance, but our spirit can perceive without these. This is intuition, the direct sense in our spirit.  

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Fellowship, like manna http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manna#Gathering (not to be confused with opposite Pacifica pagan mana),  is for us to contact God and to commune with God. This is shown in John 4:24 and Romans 1:9.    Godman means that God gave us Jesus so that we could comprehend God thru our own “kind,” so to speak, flesh/blood Jesus.    After all, God’s eternal purpose for us is to be like God.   God finishes what God starts, so that our regenerated spirit perseveres to avert having us reject God and to avert having us intentionally engage in continuous sin, including “deadly” sin.   As erudite Pastor Cathy Poai Simmons intones, we are made in God’s image to be more than  indwelled with the Word of God (Scripture)  — that is, to pour out beyond in the Spirit of God by way of God’s holy spirit in us.   The significance of the Ark of the Covenant is not just to break us out of bondage,  but more so to enjoy Jesus’ throne of grace via Jesus’ mercy seat for us (our seat of grace)    — as we are touched deepest by the throne of the kingdom of God.        According to traditional teachings of Judaism in the Talmud, the tablets of stone (tablets of testimony)  were made of blue sapphire stone as a reminder of  God’s throne.     

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cornerstone
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Book of Ephesians makes clear that Jesus is the cornerstone

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of faith   (e.g. holy spirit in the process of regeneration, justification, consecration, sanctification, transformation, glorification)

http://www.gotquestions.org/ordo-salutis.html
http://fmcusa.org/uniquelyfm/doctrine/

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from cogent observer Dale Alter    —

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To Curtis:  

Excellent insights.

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Our conscience is the mercy seat overshadowed by two real cherubim  for every saint.    

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Having our consciences cleansed from dead works by the Lamb’s blood 

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are what open the way for absolute union

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with the Spirit of the Anointed One.

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The collective manifestation of the Shekineh glory when we worship together

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 is the

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Presence of The Lord in our midst.

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Love, Dale

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In praise of Pastor Cheryle Uehara     —

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Pastor Cheryle Uehara look-alike
Grace Kelly
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Pastor Cheryle Uehara’s daughter Tammy recently passed away on the cusp of Passover and the highest of Holy Days for Christians  — Easter.   Tammy was preceded in Tammy’s homecoming with Lord Jesus by Tammy’s 2 other siblings — Pastor Cheryle’s 2 other children — leaving one child here, Tyler, as Lord Jesus’ current earthly betrothal, along with Tyler’s mother, Pastor Cheryle.
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“While it was still dark, Mary Magdalene went to the tomb.” (John 20:1)
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As with Mary Magdalene, Pastor Cheryle’s odyssey compels and inspires.
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I look up to Mary Magdalene, as I do anyone such as Pastor Cheryle and her son Tyler — all who by the grace of God  — move forward in the dark.   When there is no light. No fire. No sunrise. The future impossible to predict, anticipate or even imagine. Even the light of hope utterly extinguished. The only things left to remind us we are alive are emptiness and suffering.
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This is Mary Magdalene’s reality.  It is Cheryle’s reality, as well as Tyler’s.    It is still dark.
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These are the wee hours of Sunday. The sun yet arisen. Mary Magdalene’s heart is broken, devastated. Jesus is dead — unjustly and cruelly tortured and murdered — and with him has died every hope she had placed in the man and the message. For, if the God about which Jesus spoke is real, then how could God allow such meaningless suffering at the hands of hate and fear?
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Apparently the nihilists are right: Life is a crud, and you die.
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Anomie: “The general mood of despair at a perceived pointlessness of existence.”
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It is in this darkness that Christianity manifests   —  “Life is suffering.”     Yes, but there is so much more.    A profound riddle in this unfolding, really.    Not just ingenuity and an open mind, as one experiences especially in Asian cultures.
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I remember the wife whose husband was in a hospice bed. She pulled me into the chapel and confronted me with this question: “Is there any hope?”       I said, “It depends on what you mean by hope.”
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Is there hope that we can live and die, endure in the celebrations and sufferings of love —  and find peace, joy, meaning and purpose?
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Yes! Hope abounds!
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“Am I broken?”
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Yes, we all fall short of the glory.    One can be unlucky enough to draw a genetic flaw from the biologically capricious and  imperfect deck of life.
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“The people in darkness have seen a great Light.” (Isaiah 9:2)
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But you have to keep moving forward. While it is still dark.   There is much more up ahead.
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When your loved ones die … when your own death has moved from intellectualized data point to an actual doctor’s diagnosis … when dreams die … when your marriage dies … when your child is lost in self-destructive living … or you are likewise lost … when your enemies rule the day in injustice … when hope dies …
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Pastor Cheryle’s daughter Tammy neither asked for nor deserved a genetic flaw (aneurysm),  any more than the passengers on Germanwings Flight 9525 deserved a dangerously psychotic pilot.
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/19/world/europe/germanwings-plane-crash-andreas-lubitz-lufthansa-pilot-suicide.html?partner=rss&emc=rss
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We still have choices. We can give up. Or we can move forward. While it is still dark.
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If you don’t embrace resurrection  as a spiritual tenet, then consider it as a pattern. For resurrection has to do with the miracle of life arising from death.
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You were lost, now you are found.    You were dead, now you are alive.    In Lord Jesus.
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Hope is not a feeling; hope is a discipline.
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We move forward.     Just as Mary Magdalene does.    Just as Pastor Cheryle and Tyler do.
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We keep reaching our hands into the well of water,  thirsting for life and meaning.
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We never give up.
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Endurance is worship.
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Some of the most beautiful, most profound, most powerful, meaningful and sublime gifts are resurrected from suffering. There lies priceless treasure out there in the darkness.

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I often reflect on the verses in Psalm 87 suggesting that all believers in the One God are symbolically born into God. The psalmist envisions everyone having, in essence, two birth certificates: one recording the emergence of her or his body into this world, and the other testifying to the birth of the person’s soul in Jerusalem eons ago, at the time of Creation.
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Within the walls of Jerusalem’s Old City —   Armenians, Jews and Palestinians live in adjacent quarters. On the level of the physical body, all three peoples have endured massacres in the last century — two on a genocidal scale. So all are survivor communities, suffering-servant peoples experiencing death and resurrection, and acting as witnesses to the triumph of the spirit over horrific suffering. On the spiritual and emotional levels, all three peoples have experienced exile from their homelands, being refugees or “strangers in strange lands.”
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Can there be some transcendent lesson in this interface of sorrows and of aspirations for homecoming and healing?
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The image I have is of three traumatized individuals walking through darkness and holding flickering candles to illumine their way, candles lit by their forebears to get them through the dark nights of the soul  —
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three wandering pilgrims yearning to return home, afraid that out of the darkness some old or new enemy will attack them, afraid of perpetual victimization and the prospect of total annihilation, afraid to trust others who might help them overcome their trauma and dread.
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And then, suddenly, the three frightened pilgrims converge in Jerusalem, the light of their candles revealing each other’s faces, as each experiences the shock of mutual recognition. For in the human faces is the reflection of something mysteriously Divine.
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Each of them can echo to the others the exclamation of the wounded Jacob, renamed Israel, as he was reunited with his estranged brother Esau: “I see your face as though I am seeing the face of God.”   (Genesis 33:10)
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This transcendent sense of Jerusalem as our common Mother City, helping us face one another as siblings in the sacred family drama still unfolding in our own lives — such faith-conviction and endurance —   strengthen our hope for the healing of our world and the realization of true salvation.
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Unlike empty tropes/cure-alls/riddles  (e.g. koans  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/K%C5%8Dan#Insight ) —  Christianity overcomes vexing despair, indifference, hopelessness, and tragedy — rampant in today’s global culture of instant gratification and gratuitous violence/pleasure.
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When Paul says that Jesus died and was raised “in accordance with the scriptures,” he is not suggesting we play Where’s Waldo with the Old Testament to look for some verses that speak of Jesus in a predictive way. He is saying “look for these patterns of God’s dealings with his people of old and then see what happens with them in Jesus.”
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As an example, the Biblical Joseph story is not a “prediction” of Jesus’s crucifixion and resurrection in any sense of the word. And to limit how we see the connection between this story and the gospel as “prediction” is really to under-read the “patterns” in the Bible.
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From the point of view of the Old Testament writers,  these stories of Israel’s patriarchs were written from the point of view of Israel’s later experience of going into their own “pit/death”  of exile in Babylon –-  returning home was a kind of “national resurrection.”
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In other words, Israel’s later realities were scripted into their ancient stories.
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The gospel writers and Paul follow on this theme by portraying Jesus as returning his people from “exile,”  thus being raised from the dead. Jesus’s own physical resurrection is an embodiment and therefore fuller expression of the Old Testament nationalistic ideal.
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Creation requires transgression, the obliteration of boundaries, and a vision beyond vision. The evoker does not choose one’s creation. The creation chooses the expressor.
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Creation is a subtraction of self, an absence, a loss one experiences and hopes to share.  Loneliness.  Few ever escape the afflictions of spiritual poverty, depression, illness, and addiction. Creation hurts. One fails anew each day.
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Pastor Cheryle draws water from the well of her life’s work, and moves onward indwelled and poured out via Jesus.  Flesh world’s anomalies do not deter her.

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Paradox and irony seem quite distinct.

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Paradox relies on the clarity and exactness of language; it shows that truth can be expressed by words alone.

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Irony uses words to point beyond language.

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Irony shows that there are some truths which, though they cannot be articulated in words,

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can none the less be expressed by means of words.

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Irony, like many other figures, is a way of transcending and ultimately extending the limited resources of everyday language,

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of ensuring that it does not disguise thought

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but is both the midwife and the medium of thought.

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Not everything that can be thought at all can be thought clearly,

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but everything that can be thought at all can be put into words.

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E.g. –
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And yet,

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The Epicurean paradox “problem of evil” is a cosmic irony due to the sharp contrast/incongruity between reality and human ideals, or between human intentions and actual results. The resulting situation is poignantly contrary to what was expected or intended.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Paradoxes#Philosophy
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irony
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Visioner Liz Bishaw quotes Ezekiel 42 regarding the vision of the order and beauty of the restored kingdom ( Ezekiel 40:1-48:35  )
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that all 4 of Pastor Cheryle’s children
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are called by God to restore God’s temple.
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After all,  this is God’s
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memorial unto all generations;
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the name by which God should be made mention of both by God and others, and by which God would be called to remembrance by God’s people, and what God had promised unto them, and done for them.      
http://biblehub.com/exodus/3-15.htm
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And that the children’s mother still has more to do for and with Lord Jesus here in this life.
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Its offerings rather discountenances the view of this vision being only symbolic, and not truly literal.   This vision is literal in its entirety.  The event alone can clear it up.   At all events it has not yet been fulfilled; it must be future.
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Ezekiel was the only prophet (in the strict sense) among the Jews at Babylon.
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Daniel was rather a seer than a prophet, for the spirit of prophecy was given him to qualify him, not for a spiritual office, but for disclosing future events. His position in a heathen king’s palace fitted him for revelations of the outward relations of God’s kingdom to the kingdoms of the world, so that his book is ranked by the Jews among the Hagiographa or “Sacred Writings,”
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not among the prophetical Scriptures.
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On the other hand, Ezekiel was distinctively a prophet,
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and one who had to do with the inward concerns of the divine kingdom.
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As a priest, when sent into exile, his service was but transferred from the visible temple at Jerusalem to the spiritual temple in Chaldea.
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Such mystical visions of Pastor Liz constitute an instance of the providential boldness by which Pastor Liz operates through the Holy Spirit.  
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And both Pastor Cheryle and Tyler accept and appreciate visioner Liz’ homecoming recital.
 
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Prophecy (Coming) of Jesus by way of Old Testament  –

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Typology_(theology)#Development_of_typology

Origin of the theory

Christian typology begins in the New Testament itself, with Paul in Romans 5.14 calling Adam “a type [τύπος] of the one who was to come”, i.e. a type of Christ. He contrasts Adam and Christ both in Romans 5 and in 1 Corinthians 15.

The early Christians, in considering the Old Testament, needed to decide what its role and purpose was for them, given that Christian revelation and the New Covenant might be considered to have superseded it, and many specific Old Testament rules and requirements in books such as Leviticus dealing with Expounding of the Law were no longer being followed.  One purpose of the Old Testament for Christians was to demonstrate that the Ministry of Jesus and Christ’s first coming had been prophesied and foreseen, and the Gospels indeed were seen to contain many quotations from the Old Testament which explicitly and implicitly link Jesus to Old Testament prophecies. Typology greatly extended the number of these links by adding to Old Testament prophecies fulfilled by Christ others based on the mere similarity of Old Testament actions or situations to an aspect of Christ.

Typology is also a theory of history, seeing the whole story of the Jewish and Christian peoples as shaped by God, with events within the story acting as symbols for later events – in this role God is often compared to a writer, using actual events instead of fiction to shape his narrative.

Development of typology

The system of Medieval allegory began in the Early Church as a method for synthesizing the seeming discontinuities between the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) and the New Testament. While the Church studied both testaments and saw each as equally inspired by God, the Old Testament contained discontinuities for Christians, for example, the Jewish kosher laws and the requirement for male circumcision. This therefore encouraged seeing at least parts of the Old Testament not as a literal account, but as an allegory, or foreshadowing, of the events of the New Testament, and in particular examining how the events of the Old Testament related to the events of Christ’s life. Most theorists believed in the literal truth of the Old Testament accounts, but regarded the events described as shaped by God to provide types foreshadowing Christ. Others regarded some parts of the Bible as essentially allegorical; however the typological relationships remain the same whichever view is taken. Paul states the doctrine in Colossians 2:16-17 – “Therefore do not let anyone judge you by what you eat or drink, or with regard to a religious festival, a New Moon celebration or a sabbath day. These are a shadow of the things that were to come; the reality, however, is found in Christ.” The idea also finds expression in the Letter to the Hebrews.

The development of this systematic view of the Hebrew Bible was influenced by the thought of the Hellenistic Jewish world centered in Alexandria, where the Jewish philosopher Philo (c. 20 BCE – c. 50 CE) and others viewed Scripture in philosophical terms (contemporary Greek literary theory highlighted foreshadowing as a literary device), as essentially an allegory – using Hellenistic Platonic concepts. Origen (184/185 – 253/254) Christianised the system, and figures including Hilary of Poitiers (c. 300 – c. 368) and Ambrose (c. 340 – 397) spread it. Saint Augustine (345-530) recalled often hearing Ambrose say that “the letter kills but the spirit gives life”, and Augustine in turn became a hugely influential proponent of the system, though also insisting on the literal historical truth of the Bible. Isidore of Seville (ca. 560-636) and Rabanus Maurus (ca. 780-856) became influential as summarizers and compilers of works setting out standardized interpretations of correspondences and their meanings.

Jewish typological thought continued to develop in Rabbinic literature, including the Kabbalah, with concepts like the Pardes – the four approaches to a Biblical text.

Jacob’s Ladder from a Speculum Humanae Salvationis ca. 1430, pre-figuring the Ascension above

Typology frequently emerged in art; many typological pairings appear in sculpture on cathedrals and churches, and in other media. Popular illustrated works expounding typological couplings were among the commonest books of the late Middle Ages, as illuminated manuscripts, blockbooks, and incunabula (early printed books). The Speculum Humanae Salvationis and the Biblia pauperum became the two most successful compilations.

Example of Jonah

The story of Jonah and the fish in the Old Testament offers an example of typology. In the Old Testament Book of Jonah, Jonah told his shipmates to sacrifice him by throwing him overboard. Jonah explained that due to his own death, God’s wrath would pass and that the sea would become calm. Subsequently Jonah then spent three days and three nights in the belly of a great fish before it spat him up onto dry land.

Typological interpretation of this story holds that it prefigures Christ’s burial, the stomach of the fish representing Christ’s tomb: as Jonah exited from the fish after three days and three nights, so did Christ rise from His tomb on the third day. In the New Testament, Jesus invokes Jonah in the manner of a type: “As the crowds increased, Jesus said, ‘This is a wicked generation. It asks for a miraculous sign, but none will be given it except the sign of Jonah.’” Luke 11:29–32 (see also Matthew 12:38–42, 16:1–4). Jonah called the belly of the fish “She’ol“, the land of the dead (translated as “the grave” in the NIV Bible).

Thus whenever one finds an allusion to Jonah in Medieval art or in Medieval literature, it usually represents an allegory for the burial and resurrection of Christ. Other common typological allegories entail the four major Old Testament prophets Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and Daniel prefiguring the four Evangelists Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John; or the twelve tribes of Israel foreshadowing the twelve apostles. Commentators could find countless numbers of analogies between stories of the Old Testament and the New; modern typologists prefer to limit themselves to considering typological relationships that they find sanctioned in the New Testament itself, as in the example of Jonah above.

Other Old Testament examples

Christians believe that Jesus is the mediator of the New Covenant.  In the Sermon on the Mount he commented on the Law. Some scholars consider this to be an antitype of the proclamation of the Ten Commandments or Mosaic Covenant by Moses from mount Sinai.

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Sacrifice of Isaac

Genesis Chapter 22 brings us the story of the preempted sacrifice of Isaac. God asks Abraham to sacrifice his son Isaac to Him, cited as foreshadowing the crucifixion of Jesus. When a suspicious Isaac asks his father “where is the lamb for the burnt offering” Abraham prophesied “God himself will provide the lamb for the burnt offering, my son.” And indeed a ram caught by its horns awaited them, which is also seen as a type for Christ, the lamb that God provides for sacrifice crowned by thorns.

Joseph

Genesis Chapters 37-50 has the story of Joseph in Egypt. Joseph is commonly cited as a Christ type in the story.  Joseph is a very special son to his father. From his father’s perspective Joseph dies and then comes back to life as the ruler of Egypt. Actually Joseph’s brothers deceive their father by dipping his coat in the blood of a sacrificed animal. Later Joseph’s father finds that not only is Joseph alive but he also is the ruler of Egypt that saves the world of his day from a great famine. Other parallels between Joseph and Jesus include, both are rejected by their own people, both became servants, both are betrayed for silver, both are falsely accused and face false witnesses. Additionally, both attain stations at the “right hand” of the respective thrones (Joseph at Pharaoh’s throne and Christ at the throne of God), and both provided for the salvation of gentiles (Joseph a physical salvation in preparing for the famine, while Christ provided the deeper spiritual salvation). Finally, Joseph married an Egyptian wife, bringing her into the Abrahamic lineage, whereas Christ’s relationship with the church is also described in marriage terms in the New Testament.

Moses

Moses, like Joseph and Jonah, undergoes a symbolic death and resurrection. Moses is placed in a basket and floated down the Nile river, and then is drawn out of the Nile to be adopted as a prince (floating the body down the Nile river was also part of an Egyptian funerary ritual for royalty).

While in the wilderness, Moses put a brazen serpent on a pole which would heal anyone bitten by a snake who looked at it (Numbers 21:8). Jesus proclaimed that the serpent was a type of Himself, since “as Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, even so must the Son of man be lifted up” (John 3:14) and “For he hath made him to be sin for us, who knew no sin; that we might be made the righteousness of God in him.” (2Co 5:21)

In a battle with the Amalekites, Exodus 17:11 states that “as long as Moses held up his hands, the Israelites were winning, but whenever he lowered his hands, the Amalekites were winning.” Commentators interpret Moses’ raised hands as a type of Jesus’ raised hands upon the Cross, for when Jesus’ hands were raised as He died, a figurative battle with sin was waged, the end result being victory – that “all will be made alive.” (1 Cor. 15:22)

Inanimate types

Other types were found in aspects of the Old Testament less tied to specific events. The Jewish holidays also have typological fulfillment in the life of Christ. The Last Supper was a Passover meal. Furthermore, many people see the Spring Feasts as types of what Christ will accomplish in his first advent and the Fall Feasts as types of what Christ will accomplish in his second advent.

The Jewish Tabernacle is commonly seen as a series of complex types of Jesus Christ: for example, Jesus describes himself as “the door”,[ and the only “way” to God,[13] represented in the single, wide gate to the tabernacle court; the various layers of coverings over the tabernacle represent Christ’s godliness (in the intricately woven inner covering) and his humanity (in the dull colouring of the outside covering) The Showbread prepared in the Temple of Jerusalem is also seen as a type for Christ.

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Several Christian ethnic Hawaiian Pastors’ “cutting of genealogy”  (breaking generational curses)  are not Biblical    —

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“What does the Bible say about breaking generational curses?”Answer: The Bible mentions “generational curses” in several places (Exodus 20:5; 34:7; Numbers 14:18; Deuteronomy 5:9). God warns that He is “a jealous God, punishing the children for the sin of the fathers to the third and fourth generation of those who hate me.”It sounds unfair for God to punish children for the sins of their fathers. However, there is more to it than that. The effects of sin are naturally passed down from one generation to the next. When a father has a sinful lifestyle, his children are likely to practice the same sinful lifestyle. Implied in the warning ofExodus 20:5 is the fact that the children will choose to repeat the sins of their fathers. A Jewish Targum specifies that this passage refers to “ungodly fathers” and “rebellious children.” So, it is not unjust for God to punish sin to the third or fourth generation – those generations are committing the same sins their ancestors did.There is a trend in the church today to try to blame every sin and problem on some sort of generational curse.
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This is not Biblical.
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God’s warning to visit iniquity on future generations is part of the Old Testament Law  (Old Covenant).   A generational curse was (not is) a consequence for a specific nation (Israel) for a specific sin (idolatry). The history books of the Old Testament (especially Judges) contain the record of this divine punishment meted out.
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The cure for a generational curse has always been repentance.
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When Israel turned from idols to serve the living God, the “curse” was broken and God saved them (Judges 3:9, 15; 1 Samuel 12:10-11). Yes, God promised to visit Israel’s sin upon the third and fourth generations, but in the very next verse He promised that He would show “love to a thousand [generations] of those who love me and keep my commandments” (Exodus 20:6). In other words, God’s grace lasts a thousand times longer than His wrath.For the Christian who is worried needlessly  about a “generational curse,” the answer is salvation through Jesus Christ.
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A Christian is a new creation (2 Corinthians 5:17).
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How can a child of God still be under God’s curse (Romans 8:1)?       No way.
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The cure for a “generational curse” is repentance of the sin in question, faith in Christ, and a life consecrated to the Lord  (Romans 12:1-2
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Yes, as erudite Pastor Agngaray evokes, we all have the free will to choose between good and evil.

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Yet, inasmuch the majority of Christians do nothing but “play church,” ergo “Entertainment Tonight   — Hollywood style gossip/celebrities in the world,”

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most Christians do not pose a danger to Satan,

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and

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neither are they of any value to God!!

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quote above is from Cliff Livermore
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Dorothy Sayers correctly chastens   —  “We cannot repudiate Hell without altogether repudiating Christ.”

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In Reformed Theology (esp. in Lutheran but also in Calvinist doctrine)
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efficacy (pronounced ˈefikəsē  ) (the ability to produce a desired or intended result)
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is a key attribute of Scripture.

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The efficacy of Scripture means that it is united with the power of the Holy Spirit and with it, not only demands, but also creates the acceptance of its teaching,  and that this teaching produces faith and obedience.

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Efficacy further means that Holy Scripture is not a dead letter, but rather, the power of the Holy Spirit is inherent in it and that Scripture does not compel a mere intellectual assent to its doctrine, resting on logical argumentation, but more so it creates the living agreement of faith. 
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The Smalcald Articles affirm, “in those things which concern the spoken, outward Word, we must firmly hold that God grants His Spirit or grace to no one, except through or with the preceding outward Word.”  
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The Formula of Concord teaches that when humans reject the calling of the Holy Spirit, it is not a result of the Word being less efficacious. Instead, contempt for the means of grace is the result of “the perverse will of man, which rejects or perverts the means and instrument of the Holy Ghost, which God offers him through the call, and resists the Holy Ghost, who wishes to be efficacious, and works through the Word…”
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On the spectrum of beliefs concerning predestination, Calvinism is the strongest form among Christians. It teaches that God’s predestining decision is based on the knowledge of His own will rather than foreknowledge, concerning every particular person and event; and, God continually acts with entire freedom, in order to bring about his will in completeness, but in such a way that the freedom of the creature is not violated, “but rather, established.”
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If we doubt our own predestination, we should look for it in the God who has revealed himself in the wounds of Christ on the cross and there see a God who loved us enough to die for us. For Lutherans, systematic treatment of predestination follows the Gospel (What God has done for us in Jesus Christ) rather than being a topic discussed prior to the Gospel. As such, the sole purpose of predestination is to reinforce “Justification by Grace through Faith solely on account of Christ.”
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Conditional Election states that election is conditional on the one who wills to have faith in God for salvation. Although God knows from the beginning of the world who will go where, the choice is still with the individual.
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Comparison between Protestants

This table summarizes the classical views of three different Protestant beliefs.
Topic Lutheranism Calvinism Arminianism
Election Unconditional election to salvation only Unconditional election to salvation only, with reprobation (passing over) Conditional election in view of foreseen faith or unbelief
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Arminians say that believers can willingly repudiate their faith (either by a statement to that effect, or by continued sinful activity combined with an unwillingness to repent). Thus, their salvation is conditional on remaining faithful.   Christians can backslide or fall away —   not merely “carnal”  but having fallen from the saving grace they once possessed.
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Comparison among Protestants

This table summarizes the views of three different Protestant beliefs.
Calvinism Lutheranism Arminianism
Perseverance of the saints: the eternally elect in Christ will certainly persevere in faith. Falling away is possible, but God gives assurance of perseverance. Preservation is conditional upon continued faith in Christ; with the possibility of a final apostasy.
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Thanks, brilliant priesthood of believer Wilfredo Agngaray, for these insights.
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And just as Jacob gave to his 2nd to youngest son Joseph the birthright of the 1st-born son, ergo 1) authority over family members   2) double portion of inheritance   3) succession in leadership from father Jacob  — and just as Jacob gave to Joseph’s 2nd-born son Ephraim the birthright over 1st-born choice of Joseph  – Manasseh  – after  which Joseph overcame Joseph’s bitterness by lauding the sovereignty and mystery of God  — after all, Joseph was given the same birthright via “unfair” preference thru Jacob    –

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so do we as disciples of Jesus

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inherit the traditional birthright

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with the accompanying responsibilities of 

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fidelity/integrity to God  (vertical duty) (priestly) and

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fidelity/integrity to others  (horizontal duty  — fellow creatures of this world) (kingly).

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http://seekersofchrist.org/BIRTH/birthright.html

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Essentially,  Nebuchadnezzar  exemplifies the prodigal son (and Jesus is the prodigal son’s father)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parable_of_the_Prodigal_Son

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albeit 700 yrs. before Luke’s parable.

https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Luke%2015:11-32;&version=NIV

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Prefiguration (predictive relationship of Old Testament to New Testament)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Typology_(theology)

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and Daniel’s prophecy (in relation to Luke’s parable 700 yrs. later)

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intone Jesus’ throne of grace ergo that

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Jesus yokes equally  (not just the archetype believer/nonbeliever logos)

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the trip trigger being exhortation to Jesus’ disciples to use their God-given gifts in the service of God,

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and to

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take risks for

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the sake of the

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Kingdom of

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God.

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The landowner’s parable of talents (minas) enunciates the same principles.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parable_of_the_talents_or_minas#As_a_teaching_for_Christians

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Just the same, Nebuchadnezzar,  defiled as he was, still had God’s mercy and a chance to redeem himself with our Heavenly Father,

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though Nebuchadnezzar,

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like Red Badge of Courage soldier Henry Fleming,

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ends as he began:

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In self deception.

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Although Henry Fleming “progresses upwards toward manhood and moral triumph,”  as he begins to mature by taking leave of his previous “romantic notions,”  the education of the hero ends as it began: in self deception.”   

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Red_Badge_of_Courage#Themes

      

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tower_of_Babel#Themes

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tower_of_Babel#Genre

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Though not to the extent/degree of God’s mercy toward Nebuchadnezzar,

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 if one posits

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Nimrod’s explicit motive of cultural and linguistic homogeneity  –

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God’s actions are not punishment for pride,

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but a positive etiology (origin of a custom) of cultural differences,

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presenting Babel

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not 

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as the cradle of civilization  –

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rather, God was concerned that humans had too much freedom to do as they wished, so God brought into existence multiple languages.  Thus, humans were divided into linguistic groups, unable to understand one another.

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http://www.theologyofwork.org/old-testament/genesis-1-11-and-work/god-works-to-keep-his-promise-genesis-9-11/noahs-descendants-and-the-tower-of-babel-genesis-101-1132/

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Thus, while it appears that God’s scattering of the peoples is a punishment,

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it actually might be a means/signature of redemption.

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From the beginning, God intended people to disperse across the world. “Be fruitful and multiply, and fill the earth” (Gen. 1:28).

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By scattering people after the fall of the tower, God put people back on the path of filling the earth, ultimately resulting in the beautiful array of peoples and cultures that populate it today.

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If people had completed the tower under a singularity of malicious intent and social tyranny, with the result that “nothing they plan to do will be impossible for them” (Gen. 11:6), we can only imagine the horrors they would have worked in their pride and strength of sin. The scale of evil worked by humanity in the 20th and 21st centuries gives a mere glimpse of what people might do if all things were possible without dependence on God. As Dostoevsky put it, “Without God and the future life, it means everything is permitted.

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Sometimes God will not give us our way because his mercy toward us is too great.

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With today’s Vatican’s/Pope’s call for “one world religion,” on the analogous footing of  Nimrod’s explicit motive of cultural and linguistic homogeneity  –

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one crystalizes the thought of a singularity of purpose with potentially disastrous consequences (the Pope as god).

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The Bible is all about love in endless abundance,

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coupled however,

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with innate principles of responsibility and faith.

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Wow, the Jews had 700 yrs. head start to figure out God’s mercy and grace before the advent of Luke, and we Gentiles had 2000 yrs. to figure out Jesus’ throne of grace and our ubiquitous mercy seat (extinguish flesh, distinguish spirit)   — and yet none of us “gets it,” so to speak.

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What do you have in abundance?

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Out of that abundance, to whom might you be called to seek out and practice abundant generosity?

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As Cliff Livermore’s great editor intones,  –

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Like both the accusers and the woman caught in adultery, none of us has righteousness apart from Christ based on our own terms.

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We are dealing with a holy God and must be dressed in HIS holiness to enter into the Holy of Holies.

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We are all sinners,

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but we get to choose whether we fall upon the Rock

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or whether the Rock falls upon us.

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Either way, we get a Rock.

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Pastor Cathy Poai Simmons’ warning against dead works  is aptly summed up via writing below   –

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http://www.ligonier.org/blog/what-are-dead-works/

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Dead works are the works of our hands. These are works of self-righteousness, and they are appropriately called “dead” works because they lead to death. Twice the book of Proverbs says, “There is a way that seems right to a man, but its end is the way to death” (14:12; 16:25). We rely on work. We get significance from our work. We like a job that is well done. And well we should, because God created us to work. Yet all of our labors are useless, and thus dead, if they do not point to the worship of God. Any significance and esteem we attain from our labor apart from the end of bringing God glory and establishing His rule upon the earth is misplaced. Such godless labor may appear good to us and even receive the applause of others, but heaven finds it repulsive and defiled by sin. In other words, unless we have been washed in the blood of Christ, all our good deeds are worthless, useless, vain, and dead.

Tweet this…unless we have been washed in the blood of Christ, all our good deeds are worthless, useless, vain, and dead.

These works are lethal because the thing that most keeps people from Christ is the belief that they can be good without Him. Their lives may be filled with good deeds in the eyes of men, but such works are not necessarily good in the eyes of God. Unfortunately, many have been led astray by the church, as preachers and teachers have told them that the gospel is what they do. Live right. Eat right. Give right. Die right. The truth, however, is that only faith in Christ matters—everything else is sin (Rom. 14:23). You can sing like Mahalia Jackson or Whitney Houston. You can play like Mozart or Yo-Yo Ma. Without Christ, these works are dead. The French philosopher Blaise Pascal is believed to have said, “There are only two kinds of people in the world: the righteous who understand themselves to be sinners, and the sinners who believe themselves to be righteous.” The Bible says that, apart from God in Christ, all my righteousness is but filthy rags—defiled and unclean (Isa. 64:6). Apart from the blood of Christ, my conscience and my hands are unclean, and my worship and works are dead. But in Christ, not only am I made alive, so are my works.

Why don’t dead works cut it? Simply put, our God is a living God. God is not into dead things. Death and Christ are not friends. Whenever Jesus came upon a death, He reversed it. When Jesus went to a funeral, it did not stay a funeral. The Bible records three instances during the life of Jesus when He came in contact with the dead. Each time, the dead were brought back to life. He raised the son of a widow (Luke 7:11–17). He raised Jairus’ daughter (Luke 8:41–42; 49–56). He raised His friend Lazarus (John 11:1–44). When Jesus touches the dead, He makes them alive. Why? Because He is alive! Consequently, to serve and worship God is to serve and worship the living God. Dead people do not worship a living God. This is why the Bible says we have been made alive in Christ (Eph. 2:5). We do not glory in our dead deeds. We glory in the living Christ! Only Jesus provides the clean consciences, hands, and hearts we need to glory in Him.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Protestantism#Historical_chart

Historical chart

Historical chart of the main Protestant branches

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Pastor Cathy Poai Simmons is Pentecostal

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pentecostalism#Salvation

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Pentecostal soteriology (salvation) is generally Arminian rather than Calvinist.  The security of the believer is a doctrine held within Pentecostalism; nevertheless, this security is conditional upon continual faith and repentance.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Protestantism#Pentecostalism

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Pentecostalism, as a movement, began in the United States early in the 20th century, starting especially within the Holiness movement. Seeking a return to the operation of New Testament gifts of the Holy Spirit, speaking in tongues as evidence of the “baptism of the Holy Ghost” or to make the unbeliever believe became the leading feature. Divine healing and miracles were also emphasized. Pentecostalism swept through much of the Holiness movement, and eventually spawned hundreds of new denominations in the United States. A later “charismatic” movement also stressed the gifts of the Spirit, but often operated within existing denominations, rather than by coming out of them.

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Prophecy (Coming) of Jesus by way of Old Testament  –

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amana_(Bible)

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Christological (study of Christ) inferences in the context of chapter four of the Song of Solomon suggest a kenotic (‘self-emptying’ of one’s own will and becoming entirely receptive to God’s divine will) significance to Amana (perennial or as site of mountain ergo heaven). The husband (Christ) declares His love for His bride (the Church) throughout chapter four. He (Christ) sees no imperfection in His bride.

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This is only possible through the descent from heaven through the incarnation and the propitionary death on Calvary, establishing a typology with the Gospels.

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Amana and the other mountains are allegorical to heaven. The bride’s presence at the summit is possible through the acceptance of Christ resulting in as Paul later expressed it in Ephesians 2:6 being simultaneously “seated in the heavenlies” (figuratively) while walking in the world prior to glorification. The descent from Amana is through the dens of lions which are allegorical to the present dangers of the world and suggesting a typology with Christ’s Passion. The descent from Amana safely through the world (and by implication back to heaven [Amana]) is hand in hand with Christ.

Charles Spurgeon refers to Amana in his famous Morning and Evening devotional for September 18: “To the top of Amana, to the dens of lions, or to the hills of leopards, we will follow our Beloved.”

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kenosis#New_Testament_usage

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The New Testament does not use the actual noun kenosis,  but the verb form kenóō occurs five times (Ro.4:14, 1Co.1:17, 9:15, 2Co.9:3, Phil.2:7). Of these five times it is Phil 2:7, in which Jesus is said to have “emptied himself,” which is the starting point of Christian ideas of kenosis.

John the Baptist displayed the attitude when he said of Jesus, “He must become greater; I must become less.” (Jn 3:30).

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The kenotic ethic is the ethic of Jesus, considered as the ethic of sacrifice. The Philippians passage urges believers to imitate Christ’s self-emptying. In this interpretation, Paul was not primarily putting forth a theory about God in this passage, rather he was using God’s humility exhibited in the incarnation event as a call for Christians to be similarly subservient to others.

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In Christian theology, kenosis is the concept of the ‘self-emptying’ of one’s own will and becoming entirely receptive to God and the divine will. It is used both as an explanation of the Incarnation, and an indication of the nature of God’s activity and will. Mystical theologianJohn of the Cross‘ (1542-1591) work “Dark Night of the Soul” is a particularly lucid explanation of God’s process of transforming the believer into the icon or “likeness of Christ.”

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Another perspective is the idea that God is self-emptying. He poured out himself to create the cosmos and the universe, and everything within it. Therefore, it is our duty to pour out ourselves. (This is similar to C.S. Lewis’ statement in Mere Christianity, that a painter pours his ideas out in his work, and yet remains quite a distinct being from his painting)

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ego_death

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christian_mysticism#Gospels

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Gospels

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Transfiguration of Jesus with Moses & Elijah

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The Christian scriptures, insofar as they are the founding narrative of the Christian church, provide many key stories and concepts that become important for Christian mystics in all later generations: practices such as the Eucharist, baptism and the Lord’s Prayer all become activities that take on importance for both their ritual and symbolic values. Other scriptural narratives present scenes that become the focus of meditation: the Crucifixion of Jesus and his appearances after his Resurrection are two of the most central to Christian theology; but Jesus’ conception, in which the Holy Spirit overshadows Mary, and his Transfiguration, in which he is briefly revealed in his heavenly glory, also become important images for meditation. Moreover, many of the Christian texts build on Jewish spiritual foundations, such as chokhmah, shekhinah.

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To say, as haughty belligerent J.R Larson exclaims, that the Resurrection outdoes the Crucifixion, is to say that an airplane can fly on one wing (Resurrection) instead of the necessary two wings (including the Crucifixion) for completion/balance.    Christian mystic Pastor Robert Gomes totally transfixed into a pillar of salt J.R. face to face at Pastor Gomes’ ministry off Lanikaula St. in Hilo.

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But different writers present different images and ideas. The Synoptic Gospels (in spite of their many differences) introduce several important ideas, two of which are related to Greco-Judaic notions of knowledge/gnosis by virtue of being mental acts: purity of heart, in which we will to see in God’s light; and repentance, which involves allowing God to judge and then transform us. Another key idea presented by the Synoptics is the desert, which is used as a metaphor for the place where we meet God in the poverty of our spirit.

The Gospel of John focuses on God’s glory in his use of light imagery and in his presentation of the Cross as a moment of exaltation; he also sees the Cross as the example of agape love, a love which is not so much an emotion as a willingness to serve and care for others. But in stressing love, John shifts the goal of spiritual growth away from knowledge/gnosis, which he presents more in terms of Stoic ideas about the role of reason as being the underlying principle of the universe and as the spiritual principle within all people. Although John does not follow up on the Stoic notion that this principle makes union with the divine possible for humanity, it is an idea that later Christian writers develop. Later generations will also shift back and forth between whether to follow the Synoptics in stressing knowledge or John in stressing love.

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In his letters, Paul also focuses on mental activities, but not in the same way as the Synoptics, which equate renewing the mind with repentance. Instead, Paul sees the renewal of our minds as happening as we contemplate what Jesus did on the Cross, which then opens us to grace and to the movement of the Holy Spirit into our hearts. Like John, Paul is less interested in knowledge, preferring to emphasize the hiddenness, the “mystery” of God’s plan as revealed through Christ. But Paul’s discussion of the Cross differs from John’s in being less about how it reveals God’s glory and more about how it becomes the stumbling block that turns our minds back to God. Paul also describes the Christian life as that of an athlete, demanding practice and training for the sake of the prize; later writers will see in this image a call to ascetical practices.

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Within theistic mysticism two broad tendencies can be identified. One is a tendency to understand God by asserting what He is not and the other by asserting what He is. The former leads to what is called apophatic theology and the latter to cataphatic theology.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christian_mysticism#Types_of_meditation

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pauline_mysticism#The_mystical_teachings_of_Paul

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Even for doubters (agnostics) and especially for nonbelievers (atheists)  –

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it simply is astonishing and mind-blowing that hypothetically  –

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we can devise an ethic –

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a super conscience –

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to keep us in check –

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and balance  –

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to ensure our survival as a species among nature’s creations

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(ecosystem equilibrium akin to hydrostatic equilibrium  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrostatic_equilibrium#Fluids  ).

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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/11/22/atheist-ten-commandments_n_6198734.html?utm_hp_ref=mostpopular
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The 10 “non-commandments” — the atheist’s irreducible statements of atheist and humanist belief  –
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I. The world is real, and our desire to understand the world is the basis for belief.
II. We can perceive the world only through our human senses.
III. We use rational thought and language as tools for understanding the world.
IV. All truth is proportional to the evidence.
V. There is no God.
VI. We all strive to live a happy life. We pursue things that make us happy and avoid things that do not.
VII. There is no universal moral truth. Our experiences and preferences shape our sense of how to behave.
VIII. We act morally when the happiness of others makes us happy.
IX. We benefit from living in, and supporting, an ethical society.
X. All our beliefs are subject to change in the face of new evidence, including these.

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Cry if you have to  –

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Let it out. It’s not normal to get an infection from a paper cut or celebrate a holiday alone.

I make peace with  loneliness by acknowledging the absurdity of it.

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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jessica-gimeno/4-tips-on-celebrating-a-h_b_6222380.html?utm_hp_ref=gps-for-the-soul&ir=GPS%20for%20the%20Soul

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Understandably, here is new ager pantheist Chopra’s ‘sure’ list  –
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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/deepak-chopra/why-god-makes-more-sense-_b_6212042.html?utm_hp_ref=books&ir=Books
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/deepak-chopra/how-richard-dawkins-lost-_b_6172040.html?utm_hp_ref=books&ir=Books
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/wray-herbert/hard-to-think-straight-pr_b_6200306.html?utm_hp_ref=science
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/10/22/pan-american-health-organ_n_6029402.html?utm_hp_ref=gps-for-the-soul&ir=GPS%20for%20the%20Soul
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  1. Science isn’t by definition anti-religious.
  2. Atheists have a point when they accuse organized religion of a litany of gross failings, including crusades, jihads, and the Inquisition. But religions are human institutions prone to every human failing. Religious history is about us, not about whether God exists.
  3. God can be approached without resorting to the cultural mythology of a humanized Father and Mother watching over us from Heaven. Atheists largely attack this myth, but smashing a myth doesn’t mean you’ve smashed reality.
  4. There is a rich tradition, both East and West, of an impersonal God. This God is the source of consciousness and all that we associate with consciousness: self-awareness, intelligence, creativity, evolution, etc.
  5. The experience of God is found inside our own consciousness, not “out there” in a supernatural realm.
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  1. If all experience is subjective, going inward is a valid means of exploring reality.
  2. In this exploration, new levels of consciousness reveal themselves.
  3. At deeper levels of consciousness, perception changes radically.
  4. As perception changes, so does reality itself, since nothing is real for us beyond what we can perceive in some way.
  5. The conjunction of the individual mind with the source of consciousness is where God lives.
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Profound and inexplicable that we “first mold” (archetype typology) instinctively (internal drive)

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for some paradigm (pattern/creation)

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greater than the self

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as the only real (sane — fulfilling) path

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for finding a whole complete self.

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Jungian scholars posit that inside every human heart is a personal picture of the divine, be it a personal God or an uninvolved pantheistic entity.

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Agnostics/atheists posit that Jews have imago dei (image of God), whereas Christians have imago Christo (image of Christ).

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Symbols are the language of dreams. A symbol can invoke a feeling or an idea and often has a much more profound and deeper meaning than any one word can convey.

http://www.dreammoods.com/dreamdictionary/

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Symbols (other persons/things)  often “mask” the actual person/thing  (of one’s deepest secrets and hidden feelings –

unresolved conflicts discoverable via transference, as an example

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychoanalytic_dream_interpretation#Contemporary_psychoanalytic_approach

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transference

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Displacement_(psychology)    )

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inasmuch the real person/thing emblematic of  immense suffering stretches oneself (e.g. the dreamer) into the vortex of vulnerability –

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a psychic well so deep that is not without grave cost    –

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perhaps in the extreme instance  –   to die as one lived –  as a person of self-determination and self-worth.

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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/11/02/brittany-maynard-death_n_6077482.html?utm_hp_ref=religion

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Yet, in the depths of despair, absurdity, and indifference of life,

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one finds the deepest connectedness, the deepest continuity,

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with the primary humanity which defines you  –

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 the piety of being who you are because someone loved you.

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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/kathleen-anderson/why-cornel-west-loves-jan_b_6140744.html?utm_hp_ref=books

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Similarly   –

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesus_in_Christianity#Parables

the parables of Jesus represent a major component of his teachings in the gospels, the approximately thirty parables forming about one third of his recorded teachings.   The parables may appear within longer sermons, as well as other places within the narrative.

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Jesus’ parables are seemingly simple and memorable stories, often with imagery, and each conveys a teaching which usually

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relates the physical world to the spiritual world.

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In the 19th century, Lisco and Fairbairn stated that in the parables of Jesus, “the image borrowed from the visible world is accompanied by a truth from the invisible

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(spiritual)  world,”

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and that the parables of Jesus are not “mere similitudes which serve the purpose of illustration, but are internal analogies where nature becomes a witness for the spiritual world.”   Similarly, in the 20th century, calling a parable “an earthly story with a heavenly meaning,”  William Barclay states that the parables of Jesus use familiar examples to lead others’ minds towards heavenly concepts. He suggests that Jesus did not form his parables merely as analogies but based on an “inward affinity between the natural and the spiritual order.”

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Joshua’s trek toward the land of milk and honey (no shortage of faith), unlike Moses’ early failed quest (shortage of faith)   — is a representation of Jesus cometh.    In this sense Joshua’s parable gave ample opportunities for the “chosen ones” to indwell with Christ, and to pour out beyond in the spirit of the Holy.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laodicean_Church#.22I_wish_that_you_were_cold_or_hot.22_.28Revelation_3:15.E2.80.9316.29

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Thence, lukewarm (Laodicea) is self-deception (one foot in the world, one foot in the spirit)    — worse than cold, so to speak    —

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“I wish that you were cold or hot” (Revelation 3:15–16)

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“I know thy works, that thou art neither cold nor hot: I would thou wert cold or hot. So then because thou art lukewarm, and neither cold nor hot, I will spew thee out of my mouth.”

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The Laodiceans were criticized for their neutrality or lack of zeal (hence “lukewarm”).  Based on this understanding, the pejorative term Laodicean is used in the English language to refer to those neutral or indifferent in matters of faith.

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The Laodicean Church in the Revelation of John (Revelation 3:14–22)

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In John’s vision, recorded in the book of Book of Revelation, Christ instructs John to write a message to the seven churches of Asia Minor. The message to Laodicea is one of judgment with a call to repentance. The oracle contains a number of metaphors.

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http://www.gty.org/resources/sermons/90-233/What-is-Sin

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Psychologists reject sin because they want to exalt man, and they want to eliminate God.  So, because they reject sin, they have no explanation for why man is the way he is.  They misdiagnose him totally, so they offer really no help.  And what do we do?  We try to come up with harsher penalties, the, what is it, the three-strike law: three felonies in a row and you go to jail and they throw the key away.  We bring back the death penalty.  But nothing can end the reign of terror; nothing can end the reign of corruption.  You can’t do it with counseling.  You can’t do it with psychotherapy.  You can’t do it with Prozac.  You can’t do it, because the issue is sin.  The issue is: we’ve all inherited a corrupted nature.

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Dig out your root of bitterness    (tribute to Christian mystic Pastor Wilfredo Agngaray)    —

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http://www.greatbiblestudy.com/bitterness.php

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Bitterness is a root!

Hebrews 12:15, “Looking diligently lest any man fail of the grace of God; lest any root of bitterness springing up trouble you, and thereby many be defiled.”

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Bitterness is hidden under the soil or surface. The same is true with bitterness in a person’s soul. It is a hidden element that lies under the surface, and out of it sprouts up anger and other negative emotions against others and against the circumstances around us. People who have a root of bitterness find it easy to get upset over things that others are doing around them. It’s like a volcano that lies beneath the surface, waiting to explode onto the surface.

Bitterness is a root, thereby making it harder to identify and expose than many surface issues, but none the less it’s a deadly poison that needs to be released.

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“Why do you drink a poison brewed from the root of bitterness — in order to foment a curse on your adversary??”  rhetorically asks erudite sage Wilfredo Agngaray.

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If left alone, the root will grow and fester, and it has the ability to sprought up many surface issues such as irritability, anger, hatred, etc. Individuals who have a root of bitterness will often find it easy to become upset over little things that go on around them. It is easy for them to look at the circumstances around them as the source of their problems, rather than seeing how they are handling those circumstances. Instead of letting it go and forgiving, they let it get to them, and it devours them alive. This is a very common route by which demons enter people today.

Whether bitterness is manifest on the outside or not does not matter. Due to the nature of bottled up feelings and emotions, they are not always made noticeable on the surface, but that by no means discounts the fact that they are there. If there is a root of bitterness, it needs to be cut off at the root and removed from one’s soul. We need to make a choice to release all hurt and bottled up feelings inside our systems, and repent for holding that poison in our hearts. Turn from those feelings and forsake them, and allow the Lord’s love to minister to your soul!

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Bitterness is a deadly poison that needs to be brought into the light and addressed in order to bring many people out of spiritual, emotional and even physical bondage. Bitterness is a means for defilement and countless sickness and diseases are a result of bitterness.

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http://www.intouch.org/you/bible-studies/content.aspx?topic=Winning_Against_Bitterness_study

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Power Over Bitterness

When resentment has been growing a long time, its removal is not always instantaneous. As children of God, however, we have the capacity to eliminate all bitterness from our lives.

  • What should motivate us to forgive others? (Luke 6:36-37)

Jesus didn’t mean that our heavenly Father will not forgive us if we haven’t pardoned others. Here, Jesus is talking about the forgiveness that affects fellowship within the family of God, not the forgiveness that leads to salvation. The point is that the community of believers is to be a forgiving community, showing mercy to others just as God has shown mercy to them. He wants us to be reconciled to one another.

When we fully comprehend God’s forgiveness toward us, we simply cannot justify holding anyone else accountable.

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  • Why are we able to forgive others? (Gal. 2:20)

Just as Jesus forgave all who crucified Him, His life within us makes it possible to forgive all kinds of hurts and abuse. Because we are children of God, it’s out of character for us to allow bitter roots to take hold. By faith, we can allow Christ to express mercy through us toward others.

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We have two choices: We can allow bitterness to destroy us, or we can allow God to develop us into the people He wants us to be and He meant for us to be. We must choose to view our circumstances as tools God uses to further develop our spiritual lives.   We can put in the effort as Jesus-nourished disciples   — no matter the outcome over which we have no authority or power to control/yoke   — or we can sprout anger and tragedy for ourselves.

Prayer: Father, thank You for the mercy You’ve graciously shown me. Please give me the ability to forgive those who have wronged me. I want to be completely free from bitterness and its devastating consequences. In Jesus’ name I pray. Amen.

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http://www.greatbiblestudy.com/sws_unforgiveness.php

http://www.greatbiblestudy.com/unforgiveness_poison.php

http://www.greatbiblestudy.com/sws_unforgiveness_part2.php

The steep price of unforgiveness

I have seen so many people in spiritual bondage due to unforgiveness. It is a common source of bondage and demonic harassment, as Jesus warns us about in Matthew 18:23-35.

Matthew 18:34-35, “And his lord was wroth, and delivered him to the tormentors, till he should pay all that was due unto him. So likewise shall my heavenly Father do also unto you, if ye from your hearts forgive not every one his brother their trespasses.”

That is nothing less than a strong literal warning that a person can fall into the hands of demonic spirits for torment and harassment if they are unforgiving and bitter inside. I have seen it again and again, it is not an uncommon scene to find a person harassed by demons because of bitterness in their heart. Bitterness is also known in the Bible as spiritual poison:

Acts 8:23, “For I perceive that thou art in the gall (poison) of bitterness, and in the bond of iniquity.”

Unforgiveness not only gives demons the right or ability to torment us, but it also prevents God from forgiving our own sins! Now this is serious, this means that when we cry out for God’s help, but have unforgiveness in our hearts, He looks down and our sins are before Him. It puts up a wall in our relationship with our heavenly Father. Jesus was very clear that if we are to be forgiven, we cannot be unforgiving towards others:

Matthew 6:15, “But if ye forgive not men their trespasses, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses.”

Beyond this, bitterness is also a very common means for a born again believer to become spiritually defiled, that is, polluted or unclean spiritually:

Hebrews 12:15, “Looking diligently lest any man fail of the grace of God; lest any root of bitterness springing up trouble you, and thereby many be defiled.”

Notice the word ‘many’ in the above verse… this is a very common means for people to become defiled and open themselves up for spiritual harassment from the enemy.

Give to God the things that belong to Him

Unforgiveness is actually taking something that belongs to God, and taking matters into our own hands. God’s Word tells us clearly that we should allow God to bring His wrath upon that person, and let Him have the room to repay those who wrong us:

Romans 12:19, “Dearly beloved, avenge not yourselves, but rather give place unto wrath: for it is written, Vengeance is mine; I will repay, saith the Lord.”

Those who have wronged us will reap what they sow. If you chose to forgive somebody, they may be off your hook, but that doesn’t mean they are off God’s. God’s Word tells us clearly that what we sow, we shall reap:

Galatians 6:7, “Be not deceived; God is not mocked: for whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap.”

What unforgiveness actually is

Unforgiveness is actually a form of hate against another person. If a person hates somebody, it is a sign that the person is lacking love in their heart. Why? They are not firmly rooted and grounded in the love of Christ, and Christ’s love is not flowing through them. As simple as that sounds, that’s how it works.

What somebody may have done against us is one thing, but if you take Satan’s bait of unforgiveness to heart, it will do much more harm than they did. Do you want to continue to allow their mess to trouble you even more? Have they not done enough damage? Allowing yourself to hang onto hard feelings and become bitter is only causing your wound to become even more infected spiritually. Honestly tell yourself, what good is it doing you to hold onto the hurt and bitterness that the enemy has tried to plant within you? It is doing nothing but harm, and is holding you in bondage spiritually. The only reason you are holding onto those feelings is because it feels good inside. Don’t let this fool you, bitterness is known in the Bible as spiritual poison:

Acts 8:23, “For I perceive that thou art in the gall (poison) of bitterness, and in the bond of iniquity.”

The reason Satan wants you to hold onto that bitterness is because it is poison to your soul. Jesus said that the devil came to steal, kill and destroy. Satan wants to do just that to you. Know wonder Satan makes unforgiveness ‘feel good’… he wants your soul to be poisoned!

Don’t let him do this to you… stop him dead in his tracks! Release yourself from those hurt feelings, and let them go… stop holding onto those feelings, and let that poison out of your soul!

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Old Covenant’s theocracy has its progeny in today’s political dead works  —

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from my astute fellow politico analyst    —

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Hi Curtis,

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Yes, clearly, one gets what one invests (acumen/money/time).

Please continue to ponder this issue (Hawai’i changing demographic impact on voting) and provide any additional insights and comments as they come to mind.  I do appreciate your thoughts as you are a student, unlike any other, of the history and relationships that run Hawaii politics.     Yours truly,   — Tom   Dec. 14, 2114

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Run as democrat.  No sense get elected and then be rendered totally ineffective by the majority.

In 2008 none of the candidates, Kim, Fujiyama, Nakashima, Nakkim had much of a campaign.  None understood the concept of grass roots organizing, or chose not to use it as the campaign basis.  All based the campaigns on media.  Media cannot overpower grassroots organization (witness Abercrombie vs Ige at 10:1 $$ advantage, but Ige won).  People who do not understand campaigning feel they only can win with $$$ for media, and concentrate only on that aspect (so they lose).  Roth was outspent by Ashida, but had (in the end) better grass roots effort so he won.  Very few people understand how to win local campaigns.  Lingle, during her first gubernatorial campaign, did not have much money.  She relied on grassroots and won all islands except for a tiny area in Aiea (or thereabouts) by 1000 votes (total was 2000, but divide by 1/2) because they did not rely enough on grassroots (my brother was involved there so he saw what was going on).  Later, when she fell under the influence of big name campaign consultants from the mainland, she relied on media and money.  Got smashed.

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I’ve been a member of the republican party and know the gang.  I know how they think and how the campaign.  I keep telling them to wise up, but they don’t get it.  They always resort to issues, reasoning, and money for media.  They totally miss the most important point:  People vote based on emotions.

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Yes, how to win local grassroot campaigns (voters personally invest their hearts/emotions) as opposed to “global” (money/media) campaigns is where candidates “trip up.”

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The glitz & glam of going bigtime sadly entice even the most impervious of candidates.

Scrub Tanaka’s (1915-2006)  “ohana” (“family” in Hawaiian) outreach & “inflow” of ground support are eternal keys to victory.   The point is to distinguish one’s plan/platform and execution from the incumbent.   And then win the hearts of every existing and potential voter.

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Why does Hawai’i have just about the worst voter turnout in the nation?    The answers to this question are the keys to victory.

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Answers:   Isolated island archipelago’s traditional laid-back culture (we don’t identify as voters, we identify as so-and-so family members)  — combined with Hawai’i being a humdrum boring one-party State with no high drama   — Democrats generically agree on most social issues,  so the intra-party popularity contest takes precedence over crucial fiscal (tax/revenue/debt) matters.   It’s no mistake why Scrub Tanaka coined our age-old populist methodology as “ohana” (appeal to family)!

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from Angel on our shoulders Heather —

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Heather look-alike Catherine Deneuve

 

Hey Curtis,

Interesting insight.

For one answer to your question: why do we have the worst voter turnout?

Because among voters in elections, we have NO VOICE even if we DO vote.   (Tom above says when you vote for the wrong candidate, you need to

The poly-tics choose to run on empty but glamorous promises (if and when they do tackle real issues) — then do nothing while in office. And when they AREN’T doing that in the ads, they are merely attacking the opponents’ character.

We aren’t stupid. We can tell whether a person is of poor character. Well, some can. The rest are stupid, to everyone’s ruin (ex. A: Barrack H. Obama and family).

Anyway, when the people that run actually start working for the people who vote for them, and it becomes apparent by an overall improvement in the lives the American voters, then I will play their Game.

Other than that, the Game is rigged in favor of career politicians that merely suck the life out of the people and extort and prey upon their hard work. If “we” the people can even find work, that is.

My many cats have given me more opportunities for “shovel ready” jobs than our fraud-in-chief has even come close to offering.

Blessings,

Angel (Heather)

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Puffed up Cliff Livermore, humble Christian mystic George Gomes

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Cliff said  –

“Please share my healing prayer requests as Liz Bishaw, Violet & Calisto Mateo, & Curt have all witnessed Christ’s healing power (including Cliff’s healing 50 yr. old Chinese woman Hae-bee’s broken arm witnessed by Curt) and deeply love Christ.  Also,  they have a deep burden for true revival in these islands — manifestations of our Lord’s healing Grace and power here on the Big Island.  As you know, Louisa stands in faith in Lord God.”    (End of statement)

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Book of Esther (4:14)  —    Mordecai reminds Esther:   If you’re not willing or able to be used for good by God, God will pick someone else who shall do God’s work.

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Help includes standing in the gap (Ezekiel 22:30), so to speak, however absurd & tragic it appears (reckless risk of raising false hope/expectation).    Cliff stands in the gap.

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There’s a big difference between carrying a cross (Luke 9:23) and being crucified on one  — namely,  nails.

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Being crucified with Christ means to nail thru one’s soul to the point of death (of sinful self).

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Spirituality is meant to explore all the unattractive inner realities as well as to recommend glittering ideals.    

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The unattractive inner realities apply to us all,

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includingglittering Cliff.

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Spirituality is not  meant to provide uplift to confirm people’s prior ideological assumptions.*Spirituality says “Think! Feel!”  —  not  “You’re right.”

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Thank you, Pastor Robert Gomes, for exposing our unlovely reality — and offering a right option  — lest we disregard the foretell of the Inferno (end days).

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The point is we are to move beyond feeding milk to the lambs  —  to feeding solid food to the sheep.

Heb. 5:12-14 & 6:1-3  Anyone who lives on milk, being still an infant, is not acquainted with the teaching about righteousness. Solid food is for the mature, who by constant use have trained themselves to distinguish good from evil.
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Therefore let us leave the elementary teachings about Christ and go on to maturity, 
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…  the foundation of repentance from acts that lead to death, and of faith in God, instruction about baptisms, the laying on of hands, the resurrection of the dead, and eternal judgment.

What then is solid food?  It is training in righteousness so that the sheep can be fully equipped, able to stand in the day of testing.

2 Tim. 3:16-17  All Scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness, so that the man of God may be thoroughly equipped for every good work.

Pop psychology and worldly methodology do not feed sheep.  They must be fed on the written Word of God (responsibilities) as it is exegeted properly and applied by the Holy Spirit.  

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 Extinguishing distinction  — the self — applies to us all, including distinctive Cliff.

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http://www.deceptioninthechurch.com/agoodshepherd.html

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Like Apostle Paul (completing –the Word of God — ministry), Pastor Robert Gomes does not play church, so to speak  — but instead avoids “natural thinking” presumptions (fleshly overpride/vanity/envy/jealousy) by stepping out (as Jesus did) in the world and taking risks of harm (by saving lost souls and those possessed of the spirit of unbelief) as the tests which need to be met in our authentic walk in Christ.

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Pastor Robert Gomes knows the truth about men and flesh  — born lost — and thus Pastor Robert is deemed alarming and dangerous to religious Christians (milk of the Word as opposed to righteousness of the Word) who cherry pick verses even to longtime “walking/waking dead” disciples  —  to sugar coat sin (forgiveness means that I can sin and sin again and again) and repentance (just say I’m sorry  — no need to extinguish our old self/natural ways) and Satan himself (die and go to heaven   — death, physical/spiritual —  itself is not the eternal fate for lost souls).

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In praise of incredibly intuitive mystical Pastor Robert Gomes, and in praise of Christian missioner Kolina Ana, and in praise of her predecessor Jean-Frédéric Oberlin

image
In praise of incredibly intuitive mystical Pastor Robert…

* In praise of incredibly intuitive mystical pastor Robert Gomes    – * Immense Christian mystic  Pastor Robert Gomes look-alike    – * * Pastor Robert Gomes’ wife …
Preview by Yahoo

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being human   — honest frailty is inherent in our DNA

Rapacious Cliff Livermore emboldens on being everyone’s Exhibit A of redemption.    Cliff does not want to be everyone’s pagan fairy tale  — where miracles manifest, then belief in the superhuman takes hold.   Drama’s correct endpoint is love forevermore springwelled by faith (Jesus’ blood of our new creation/Jesus’ living water of God’s holy spirit e.g. 1 Cor. 15:10).   Faith, then signs.   Not the other way around — not signs, then faith (idolatry).

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Universal appealing narrative is about us  — it illuminates our own lives.  Narrative also discloses truths that shape or misshape our psyche.

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As such, Cliff Livermore’s narrative details the unconscious desire and dilemma to be liberated in self, as

Cliff falls into the bondage of self

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The bondage of self has no redemption.  

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Liberation in self gets out of the self and into Jesus. 

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Therein redemption abounds.

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When the human ego conscripts the language, the work and the mantle of self-respect, you start to feel really good and right about discarding people from your life.

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And then you can know that you were right, because you don’t have any friends at all.

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Self-respect and self-importance — not the same at all. But they can feel the same.

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Why can’t I be like you or in sync with you?

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Because then there would be no need for a me, just you. 

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Cliff Livermore  reeks of excessive self-absorption and blowhard excretion.   Biblical Simon here fits Cliff’s description.

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http://www.lawofliberty.com/sermons/Resources/01-fromsimontopeter.pdf

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Cliff’s book editor lovingly chuckles     –

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Exactly!!    I also have compared Cliff to Simon Peter.    We have to reel in Cliff, but Cliff is very good to repent and start over.  (how many times do we tolerate Cliff’s fallen nature?)

I am glad you are Cliff’s good friend!

Also that you question assumptions and ask us to see things through another lens.

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Cliff’s response is predictable    –

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1.  I don’t give a rat’s ass (to whom you liken me in Scripture — ergo Simon Peter)!!

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2.  I don’t have an identity problem!!!!    (I belong to Jesus!!)

Cliff’s mind-blowing couplet (pair of sentences)  a la the great Alexander Pope really is the story of Cliff’s life.    Sad but true.

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5 Responses to New Testament external prompts correlate with the convergence of the human and holy spirit and the sacred items in the Ark of the Covenant

  1. from cogent observer Dale Alter –
    Excellent insights. Our conscience is the mercy seat overshadowed by two real cherubim for every saint. Having our consciences cleansed from dead works by the Lamb’s blood are what open the way for absolute union with the Spirit of the Anointed One. The collective manifestation of the Shekineh glory when we worship together is the Presence of The Lord in our midst. Love, Dale

  2. Pingback: The Bible just blows me away, baby! Example: It’s no accident that Jesus, as the lamb of God, was born in a manger | Curtis Narimatsu

  3. Pingback: Modern society’s devolution and self-absorption — we need symbols which participate in the things they represent | Curtis Narimatsu

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  5. Pingback: Music: A bridge from abandonment and brokenness to wholeness and freedom | Curtis Narimatsu

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