The Bible just blows me away, baby! Example: It’s no accident that Jesus, as the lamb of God, was born in a manger

*

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+fantastic+bible&qpvt=images+fantastic+bible&FORM=IGRE#view=detail&id=D9AA2045D644BF954A35E0FDFF03B6E64FC722C4&selectedIndex=33

*

*

Thank you, prescient mystical Pastor Wilfredo Agngaray, for the providential correlation of the manger to both a lamb and Jesus.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lamb_of_God#Christology

*

And in the analogy that the blood of the Lamb of God (and the water from the side of Jesus) shed at the crucifixion was a cleansing like baptismal water   —  the water shows (physiologically) that Jesus died from rupturing of the heart (water separated from blood after Jesus’ heart stopped).   The manger setting with water is baptism, the Cross setting with water is redemption.
*
Revelation 21:14 says the “lamb slain but standing” is the only one worthy of handling the scroll (i.e. the book) containing the names of those who are to be saved.
 *
*
*
*
*

*

*

*

*

The Bible blows me away for the Bible’s reversal of expectation (inside-out/outside-in)   — “swallowing one’s own stomach,” so to speak.    Incomprehensibility outcomes as authenticity/truth.    Especially Jesus turns common-sense ideas upside down, confounding us all with spiritual reality  (e.g. “Heaven’s imperial rule” is present but unseen)(e.g. Jesus evokes not simply an apocalyptic eschatology/end-time, but more critically a sapiential eschatology, which encourages all of God’s children to repair the world now).

*

Dramatic presentation , irony, reversal, and frustration of expectations are characteristic of Jesus (e.g. good Samaritan parable/Beatitudes).    Does a pericope/concise passage illustrate opposites or impossibilities?   Yes, Jesus teaches us all.   Thank you, intuitive pastors Robert and Donna Mae Gomes.

https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2013/04/12/in-the-case-of-christ-we-have-a-unique-form-of-persuasion-it-is-like-what-happens-when-an-error-in-our-viewpoint-is-shown-to-us-and-our-mind-reassembles-around-the-truth-that-we-have-not-seen-but-i/

*

The aphorisms and parables of Jesus function in a particular way: they are invitational forms of speech.

*

Jesus used them to invite his hearers to see something they might not otherwise see.

*

As evocative forms of speech, they tease the imagination into activity, suggest more than they say, and invite a transformation in perception.

*

Drawing pictures from their own familiar world, He arrested their minds, captured their imaginations, and opened them ever so gently to the stirrings of the ancient language deep within them.

*

Jesus liked to put His listeners in almost everything He told,

*

and by the way, you and I were there as well—

*

the least, the last, the little and the lost.

*

These were the objects of His loving attention in those stories He told. –

*

“But many who are first will be last; and the last, first.”

*

*

Lukewarm is worse than cold, so to speak, just as the good portion of the tree of knowledge also is self-deception (contaminated by self/Satan)  –

*

“I wish that you were cold or hot” (Revelation 3:15–16)

*

“I know thy works, that thou art neither cold nor hot: I would thou wert cold or hot. So then because thou art lukewarm, and neither cold nor hot, I will spew thee out of my mouth.”

*

*

Interpreting Scripture requires an understanding of spiritual language, the hidden truth that lies just beneath its surface.

*

The Penetrating Questions of Jesus manifested a profound ability to ask the right question at the right time.

*

Jesus knew what lay in the dark corners of men’s hearts.

*

Through the use of questions He exposed the motivations of the hearers—not to shame but to heal them.

*

Through the use of the poignant question, Jesus gently uncovered the realties of our inward life, the life seen by no one.

*

But Jesus sees it.

*

He knows what is in the heart of man because He has traveled the corridors of every man’s heart.

*

In fact, as many of us have discovered, sometimes to our chagrin, He sees our hearts better than we do.

*

By the power of the query He turns the light on our inward parts.

*
The questions of religious men are crafted that they might expose for the purpose of judging and condemning. In contrast, the questions of Jesus were specifically designed to reveal for the purpose of healing.
*
Rejection fills life.
*
“How can you believe, when you receive glory from one another and you do not seek the glory that is from the one and only God?” John 5:44 “But if you do not believe his writings, how will you believe My words?” John 5:47
*

Questions such as these test our ability to look deeply at spiritual reality while they also force us to peer beneath the surface of life.

*

They will also unlock the door to the ancient language.

*

Our attempts to look for the answers to the questions and the struggle to express those answers open new pathways of personal and spiritual reality.

*

If we allow the question to do its job, it will search us and reveal the hidden, broken places in our hearts that it may accomplish what Jesus intended.

*

*

*
*

At the soup kitchen for the homeless, a paranoid guy rants and rages with the food servers. Angelic gorgeous patron Pauline soothingly and fluidly comes up to the servers and says, “Please forgive my ex-husband for acting up like this.” And just like that, presto/voila, the whole world is a changed place — for the better!!

*

Of course, the servers suspect that Pauline is jiving, which she really is (jiving). And the paranoid fella simply falls “beside himself,” & backs off in a daze that he just got one-upped by this angel of mercy Pauline. He slides away in a totally confounding fog.

*

The servers relievingly chuckle and smile like you never saw anyone so relieved smile before!! Yes, in one fell swoop, Pauline pulled off a Jesus moment!! Wow!! How humbling can be the thought of a Jesus moment!! Wow!

*

*
*
*
The New Testament prompts not only correlate with the Old Testament tablets of stone (e.g.  first prompt of baptism & the coming of Jesus) and the convergence of the human and holy spirit   —
*

the prompts also correspond with the other three items in the Ark of the Covenant and the Holy Spirit –

*

*

the Lord’s table  juxtaposes with the Torah Scroll and intuition;

*

the  breaking of the bread  juxtaposes with manna and fellowship;

*

and the sipping of the wine juxtaposes with Aaron’s rod and conscience.

*

*

Understandably, our spiritual intuition, fellowship, & conscience are inseparable, just as the convergence of our human & holy spirit consists as fluid in one broth, so to speak.

*

https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2014/12/10/new-testament-external-prompts-correlate-with-the-convergence-of-the-human-and-holy-spirit/

*

https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2014/08/27/the-young-man-with-terminal-cancer-was-going-to-die-quicker-than-he-thought-and-he-was-very-depressed-about-this-and-of-course-he-hadnt-gotten-to-make-his-mark-and-he-had-this-conversation-with-t/

*

*
*
*
http://www.reviewjournal.com/columns-blogs/steven-kalas/embrace-rebirth-epiphany
*

Praying down heaven

*

 is outside-in.

*
You zero in on a frequency.
*
“I’ve had an epiphany,” you say. And then, “I’m not exactly sure what’s happening to me.”
You got that right. Something is happening to you. That is, this is nothing you’re doing, nothing you’re deciding. This is outside-in.
*
Incredulity is the right response to an epiphany. Incredulity is the wonderful, delicious (and awkward, frightening and uncomfortable) moment when everything you think you know and think you believe slams into a Deeper Reality. A Deeper Truth. And there, suddenly, you “get” that you don’t know anything much at all.
*
An epiphany is an in-breaking. No one knows why or how they happen. Or why they don’t. Or maybe epiphanies are always happening, always around us. In which case no one knows why or how they are suddenly recognized and acted upon. Or recognized and refused. Or never recognized.
*
Epiphany experiences are and will remain a mystery. Which is part of why epiphanies are so utterly cool when they happen to you. Or when, like me today in this office, you get to be an audience to an epiphany rippling through someone else.
*
For Christians, Epiphany is a liturgical feast day (Jan. 6, although the date varies in some churches), recalling and retelling the story of a star beckoning three astrologers (the Magi) to the birth of Jesus. This epiphany was a cosmic in-breaking, recognized and acted upon by “Three Wise Men.” They followed the star. They were obedient to the signs and energies inviting them forward into a new life. A new understanding of themselves and the world.
*
Epiphany experiences are about birth all right — our birth! And rebirth! Again and again life presents the invitation to burn down our limiting, inauthentic, not-so-useful, not-so-lovely and sometimes really unhappy, unpleasant or even destructive ways of being in exchange for a new vision of self and the world.
*
A better vision.
*
I tell the man he reminds me of Ebenezer Scrooge who, after an epiphany of three dreams, is standing in his pajamas on a snow- crusted balcony, tossing money over into the street, giggling and dumbstruck, like a man bailing water out of a foundering boat.
*
Like an innocent child.
*
Incredulity is the first response to epiphany. Gratitude should be the next. Thirdly, action! Go. Do. Redeem your past self now with every breath, word and deed.
*
It’s time to see the star again.
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

 

*

 

*

 

*

 

*

 

*

The value of the Old Testament includes not just the representation of Jesus  — but also the expectation of long suffering  (perseverance of the saints)     –

*
*
http://www.patheos.com/blogs/peterenns/2014/12/well-at-least-the-old-testament-has-one-thing-going-for-it/
*
Their experiences are very much like ours today: life is hard, and life of faith does not automatically make it easier. It may actually make it harder at times.
Spiritual struggles are normal for Christians. They are not to be sought after, but they are normal. They are not to be romanticized, but they are normal. They are not to be shown off and bragged over, but they are normal.
To speak otherwise is to ignore the counter testimony. The Bible tells me so–and I’m glad it does.

*

*

Dig out your root of bitterness    (tribute to Christian mystic Pastor Wilfredo Agngaray)    –

*
*

Bitterness is a root!

Hebrews 12:15, “Looking diligently lest any man fail of the grace of God; lest any root of bitterness springing up trouble you, and thereby many be defiled.”

*

*

“Why do you drink a poison brewed from the root of bitterness — in order to foment a curse on your adversary??”  rhetorically asks erudite sage Wilfredo Agngaray.

*

Amen!!
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

From revelator Kolina Ana    —

*

Thank you for this online article too!

I enjoy this e-mail and the various site resources.   Thank you for your roles in sharing .different speakers and topics.

Have a joyous and blessed CHRISTmas for you are a King’s son and HE LOVES you with an everlasting LOVE based on

who HE is and HIS faithfulness.    Have a blessed day in the LORD, our creator of Heaven & Earth and our very being.

*
*
*

*

*

*

New Testament external prompts correlate with the convergence of the human and holy spirit and the sacred items in the Ark of the Covenant

*

*

Overall integration of New Testament prompts

*

and coalescence via human and holy spirit

*

and prefiguration (predict the coming of Jesus) in the Ark of the Covenant

*

*

*

 

*

*

*

New Testament “external” impressions consist of 4  prompts:   1) baptism  2)  Lord’s table  3)  breaking bread at the Lord’s table  4) sipping wine at the Lord’s table.

*

Not “cutting genealogy” (breaking generational curses) as several ethnic Hawaiian pastors exhort, nor sealing via Revelation 7:3  (“Do not harm the land or the sea or the trees until we put a seal on the foreheads of the servants of our God”).

*

*

The New Testament prompts not only correlate with the Old Testament tablets of stone (e.g.  first prompt of baptism & the coming of Jesus)   —  the New Testament prompts also correspond with the convergence of the human and holy spirit.

*
*
*

Our regenerated spirit (our human and holy spirit are inseparable & fluid)  has 1)  intuition, 2) fellowship, and 3) conscience.    

http://www.ministrysamples.org/excerpts/THE-THREE-PARTS-OF-THE-SPIRIT-CONSCIENCE-FELLOWSHIP-AND-INTUITION.HTML

*

Just as Jesus ended for us the self/soul (soul consists of mind/will/emotion) at Gethsemane — “not my will, but Thy Will (God’s Will) be done”  — and just as Jesus ended for us the flesh (carnal lust for sex/fame/fortune) the next day at Calvary (Crucifixion),  so does the Lord’s table exemplify our spirit’s commitment to Christ via our spiritual intuition.

*

And so does the breaking of the bread exemplify our collective spiritual fellowship in the body of Christ in one accord (a new life in Christ).

*

And so does the sipping of the wine exemplify our spiritual conscience in choosing good over evil, no matter the cost of discipleship (crucify our sinful ways to be born in the spirit of Christ).

http://www.ministrysamples.org/excerpts/DENYING-THE-SELF-BY-DENYING-THE-NATURAL-MIND-EMOTION-AND-WILL.HTML
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eucharist
*

And just as the Mercy seat during Yom Kippur was a prefiguration (prophecy) of the Passion of Christ  — a greater atonement — the New Covenant (Hebrews 9:3-15) —   a shadow of things to come (Hebrews 10:1)  — predicting the coming of Christ  —

*

*

*

so do the three items in the Ark of the Covenant exemplify the Holy Spirit and the prompts –

*

*

the Torah Scroll juxtaposes with intuition and the Lord’s table;

*

the manna juxtaposes with fellowship and the breaking of the bread;

*

and Aaron’s rod juxtaposes with conscience and the sipping of the wine.

*

*

Understandably, our spiritual intuition, fellowship, & conscience are inseparable, just as the convergence of our human & holy spirit consists as fluid in one broth, so to speak.

*

*

*

*

*

And like the older Biblical Jacob  —    Pastors Wilfredo Agngaray, Cathy Poai Simmons, & Robert Gomes  –

*

1)  shake off the dust (do not react in the flesh or of the self) of “the world,” so to speak,

*

2) and empathize with adversaries, if there by any, by praying  for their imperviousness to afflictions.

*

I thank disciples of Jesus   — Bruce & Isa (pronounced “Eesa”) Sakamoto of the Church in Hilo, along with their prodigy & scholar Daniel Tavares– for their inspiration and fellowship  — 

http://churchinhilo.org/index.html

*

*

*

*

Jacob’s ladder

*

is the human soul and the angels are God’s logoi (messengers),

*

1)  pulling up the soul in distress (release from suffering)  — “shake off the dust”  — don’t overreact –

*

2)  and descending in compassion (empathize/pray for adversaries).

*

#2 above is characterized as “praying down heaven” to earth.   Smith Wigglesworth was a man who knew how to “pray down” heaven. He understood the powers available from above and knew how to bring those powers into this realm.   Pastor Cathy Poai Simmons especially is inspired by Smith Wigglesworth.    Angel Dust  Leilani Well imbued us all in “Martin Luther tabletalk” (Pastor Cathy’s ministry) with “praying down heaven.”

http://www.sermoncentral.com/sermons/praying-heaven-down-dan-anderson-sermon-on-prayer-adoration-96978.asp

*

This thought comes from the Lords Prayer. When the disciples asked Jesus how to pray, He responded, “May your kingdom come, your will be done on earth as it is in heaven.” [Matthew 6:10] Or basically, we are to pray in faith: As it is in heaven, may it be that way now – on earth!      

http://www.pastorericdykstra.com/eric_offstage/2013/05/praying-heaven-down-pastor-eric-dykstra-the-crossing-church-elk-river-mn.html

*

If only You would tear the heavens open [and] come down, so that mountains would quake at Your presence…”     Isaiah 64:1-3

http://mountain-top-musings.blogspot.com/2012/07/praying-heaven-down.html

*

*

*

*

*

*

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacob%27s_Ladder#Judaism

*

*

Jacob’s Dream by William Blake (c. 1805, British Museum, London)

*

*

Segment above is in my article here      –

*

https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2014/03/28/luck-of-the-draw-bad-or-good-forgive-yourself-for-what-is-not-in-your-power-to-do-steven-kalas/    (in praise of Pastor Cathy Poai Simmons)

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

The earthly tabernacle was patterned after the one in heaven (Exodus 25:9, 40; 26:30; 27:8; Numbers 8:4; Acts 7:44; Hebrews 8:1-5; 9:11-12)

*

*

Spiritual gifts, including the miraculous, 1 Corinthians 12:4-11, 12:27-31, Romans 12:3-8, Ephesians 4:7-16 — impress (via the holy spirit) today.    Pastor Cathy Poai Simmons’ fruit of the Spirit (transformation & sanctification) manifests her spiritual character of love, not of her  as a gifted (purified/holy) disciple, but of the glorious building up of the collective body of Christ. 

*

http://www.abideinchrist.com/messages/ex25v22.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deliverance_ministry

http://www.sermoncentral.com/sermons/when-a-seat-of-mercy-becomes-a-throne-of-grace-everett-mccoy-sermon-on-grace-124553.asp?Page=2

*

God interfaces sinful man with Jesus at the Tabernacle’s Mercy Seat.    The Shekinah glory shows God’s presence between the cherubim over the cover of the Mercy Seat.    Sin separates man from God. A holy God shuts out sinful man from the Mercy Seat by walls and the veils. Our sins shut out us from the presence of a thrice holy God.   When the sinner could not go to heaven because of his coming short of the glory of God, God in the person of His Son came from heaven to earth “that He might bring us to God.” (1 Peter 3:18)  God issues an invitation for each of us eventually to “draw near with confidence to the Throne of Grace,” so that we may complete via mercy (Mercy Seat) from Jesus and grace to help in time of need. (Hebrews 4:16)   Let’s “keep on drawing near(er)” with confidence to the places and times where God meets us in Christ.    We come now to the Mercy Seat (for eventual salvation), to draw nearer to Jesus’ Throne of Grace.   

*

Essentially, Jesus’ Mercy Seat for us and Jesus’ Throne of Grace contrast God’s relationship with man in the Old and New Covenants. When God set up residence on earth, He called His throne the Mercy Seat (for us all).   After Calvary Jesus prompted man via the Holy Spirit to Jesus’ Throne of Grace.  

*

The Old Testament was the preparation for the coming of Christ.   And Christ fulfilled Old Testament prophecy.

*

*

In the ark we saw the person of Christ, but in the Mercy Seat we see the work of Christ.   In the Throne of Grace we see the fulfillment of Christ in us.

 *

God has revealed His heart to us by the name of His throne.  Man comes frighteningly to the Judgment Seat, and finds the Mercy Seat, though Judgment eventually awaits us all.

*

Jesus’ Mercy Seat is a place we go to and not be condemned. And this is wonderful. Yet God has so much more for us. By way of Jesus, God’s throne is now called the Throne of Grace.  Not only will He forgive (Mercy), or not give you what you do deserve (destruction)  —  His intent is to bless, or give you what you do not deserve (Grace)!

 *

*

Segment above is in articles here    –

*

https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2014/03/28/luck-of-the-draw-bad-or-good-forgive-yourself-for-what-is-not-in-your-power-to-do-steven-kalas/     (in praise of Pastor Cathy Poai Simmons)

*

https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2014/03/28/1-peter-48-love-covers-a-multitude-of-sins-center-of-grace-or-in-the-secular-sense-forgive-yourself-for-what-is-not-in-your-power-to-do/    (tribute to Pastor Wilfredo Agngaray)

*

https://curtisnarimatsu.wordpress.com/2014/03/27/in-praise-of-christian-missioner-kolina-ana/   (testimonial to Pastor Robert Gomes)

*

*

The Old Testament prepares the way for the New Testament, and all of God’s promises find their “yes” and “amen” in Christ (2 Corinthians 1:20). The exodus from Egypt, though a real, historical event, prefigures the saving work of Christ for His people. What God did through Moses was to provide physical salvation from physical slavery. What God does through Christ is provide spiritual salvation from a spiritual slavery. However, our slavery isn’t like that of the Israelites in Egypt. The Israelites were slaves in Egypt, but we are all slaves to sin. As Jesus said to the Pharisees, “Truly, truly, I say to you, everyone who commits sin is a slave to sin. So if the Son sets you free, you will be free indeed” (John 8:34, 36).

The passing through the Red Sea is symbolic of the believer’s identification with the death, burial and resurrection of Jesus Christ. The apostle Paul says, “For I want you to know, brothers, that our fathers were all under the cloud, and all passed through the sea, and all were baptized into Moses in the cloud and in the sea, and all ate the same spiritual food, and all drank the same spiritual drink. For they drank from the spiritual Rock that followed them, and the Rock was Christ” (1 Corinthians 10:1–4). Paul is giving the exodus from Egypt a Christological reading; he is making the connection between the exodus from Egypt and salvation in Christ. Notice how Paul says “all were baptized into Moses.” Just as the Israelites were “baptized into Moses,” so too are Christians baptized into Christ: “We were buried therefore with him by baptism into death, in order that, just as Christ was raised from the dead by the glory of the Father, we too might walk in newness of life” (Romans 6:4).

So the parting of the Red Sea not only finalized God’s redemption of His people from slavery in Egypt, but it also prefigured the greater spiritual reality of God’s redemption of His people from slavery to sin through the work of Christ.

Read more: http://www.gotquestions.org/parting-Red-Sea.html#ixzz3Ml5z2EcU

*

Brain Memory

http://www.keithhunt.com/Taber2.html

Old Testament Symbols for Jesus

The Physical to the Divine

                    THE OLD TESTAMENT SYMBOLS OF JESUS


THE TABERNACLE

The place where God dwelled among his people
Exodus 25 Isaiah 9:6
Mt.1:22,23 John 1:14 Heb.10:1

Then have them make a sanctuary for me, and I will dwell among
them. Make this tabernacle and all its furnishings exactly like
the pattern I will show you. 
-- Exodus 25:8,9

The Word became flesh and made his dwelling among us... 
-- John 1:14


THE HIGH PRIEST

The high priest offers gifts and sacrifice for sins in 
the Holy Place

Jesus is our too high priest in the true tabernacle in heaven 
that was made by God not by man

Exodus 28:1; 29:9; Lev.16:30
Hebrews 4:14,15; 8:1-3; 9:11

...because on this day atonement will be made for you, 
to cleanse you. Then, before the LORD, you will be clean from
all your sins.
--Leviticus 16:30

When Christ came as high priest of the good things that are
already here, he went through the greater and more perfect
tabernacle that is not manmade... 
-- Hebrews 9:11


THE SACRIFICE

Each year, the High Priest offered a blood sacrifice for the sin
of the people

Jesus was the perfect and final sacrifice for all time

Exodus 30:10
Romans 3:21-26; 5:8-10

Once a year Aaron shall make atonement on its horns... 
-- Exodus 30:10a

... We have been made holy through the sacrifice of the body of
Jesus Christ once for all.... But when this priest [Jesus] had
offered for all time one sacrifice for sins, he sat down at the
right hand of God. 
-- Hebrews 10:10,12



THE ARK

Place of God's presence

Jesus is God in human form

Exodus 25:22; John 1:14

There, above the cover between the two cherubim that are over the
ark of the Testimony, I will meet with you... -
- Exodus 25:22

The Word became flesh and made his dwelling among us...
-- John 1:14

Constructed of acacia wood

Represents Jesus' hunan nature

Exodus 25:10
Romans 1:3; Phil. 2:6,7; 1 Tim.2:5

Have them make a chest of acacia wood...
-- Ex.25:10a

Who, being in very nature God ... made himself nothing, taking
the wry nature of a servant, being made in human likeness.
--Philippians 2:6,7


Covered with gold inside and out

Represents Jesus' divine nature

Exodus 25:11
John 1:1,14; 10:30,33; 14:6-9

Overlay it with pure gold, both inside and out... 
--Ex.25:11 

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God and the
word was God ...  The Word became flesh and made his dwelling
among us... 
--John 1:1,14a


THE CONTENTS OF THE ARK


The Ten Commandments "the Testimony"

The Law given by God

Jesus said the he came to "fulfill the Law"

Exodus 20:1-17
Matthew 5:17,18; 22:36-40; Luke 16:16,17

And God spoke these words ... You shall not have any gods before
me... 
-- Exodus 20:1-17

Do not think that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets;
I have not come to abolish them but to fulfill them. 
-- Matthew 5:17


AARON'S ROD

Represented God's choice for priesthood, and that God brings life
from death

Jesus is the chosen high priest and is the resurrection and the
life

Numbers 17:5,8,10 
Matthew 3:17; John 11:25; Heb.3:1,2; 9:4

The staff belonging to the man I choose will sprout... 
-- Numbers 17:5a

And a voice from heaven said, "This is my Son, whom I love; with
him I am well pleased." 
-- Matthew 3:17


MANNA

Given by Good as food to the people in the wilderness

Jesus called himself the "bread of life"

Exodus 16 John 6:35,48-51

Then said the LORD unto Moses, "Behold, I will rain bread from
heaven for you..." 
-- Exodus 16:14a

I am the living bread which came down from heaven... 
-- John 6:51a

                         ........................

*

*

http://www.theopedia.com/Biblical_typology

http://www.bible-researcher.com/schmeling.html

http://theologicalstudies.org/resource-library/how-to-study-the-bible/369-interpreting-types

https://books.google.com/books?id=geKPBAAAQBAJ&pg=PA56&lpg=PA56&dq=prefiguration+of+christ+in+the+old+testament&source=bl&ots=7LwSPzoAao&sig=dCSYM1yPTOdjkCDQE374Wl9TgKE&hl=en&sa=X&ei=HPSZVM70MoLeoASY6oLgCQ&ved=0CCIQ6AEwATgU#v=onepage&q=prefiguration%20of%20christ%20in%20the%20old%20testament&f=false

http://icucourses.com/pages/037-01-christ-prefigured-in-the-old-testament

http://evidenceforchristianity.org/historical-prefigures-and-foreshadows-in-the-old-testament/

http://www.christwardcollective.org/christward/death-and-resurrection-the-key-to-the-old-testament#.VJn0kxf5AJA

http://www.hebrewcatholic.net/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/11.02TypologyExplainedintheNewTestament.pdf

http://www.tecmalta.org/tft155.htm

http://www.catholicnewsagency.com/resources/sacraments/reconciliation/old-testament-events-prefigure-the-sacrament-of-reconciliation/

http://christianity.stackexchange.com/questions/9791/which-are-the-parts-of-the-old-testament-that-point-to-jesus

http://www.ligonier.org/learn/articles/christ-old-testament/

http://feedingonchrist.com/old-testament-personal-types-and-shadows-of-christ/

http://catholicexchange.com/9-ways-jonah-prefigured-jesus

http://catholicdefense.blogspot.com/2011/05/five-ways-old-testament-foreshadowed.html

http://www.victorianweb.org/art/stainedglass/hedgeland/1.html

https://www.fisheaters.com/typology.html

http://www.charismamag.com/spirit/bible-study/15023-finding-jesus-in-the-old-testament

http://www.gty.org/resources/sermons/90-430/an-introduction-to-christ-in-the-old-testament

http://biblestudysite.com/foretold.htm

http://www.lwf.org/site/News2?id=12419

http://biblestudyplanet.com/jesus-from-genesis-to-revelation-2/

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Coming of Christ in the Ark of the Covenant      –

*

*

*

Three items in the Ark of the Covenant also exemplify the Holy Spirit  –

*
*

Besides the Tablets of Stone  (predictive of the coming of Jesus

*

Tablets of Stone – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia  

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Throne#Christian_Bible

Gospel of Luke (1:32-33):  “He will be great, and will be called the Son of the Highest; and the Lord God will give Him the throne of His father David. And He will reign over the house of Jacob forever, and of His kingdom there will be no end.”  )

image
Tablets of Stone – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Tablets of Stone, Stone Tablets, Tablets of Law, or Tablets of Testimony (in Hebrew: לוחות הברית Luchot HaBrit – “the tablets [of] the covenant”) in the Bible, …
Preview by Yahoo
*

(The Epistle to the Hebrews recounts the description of the Ark, Holy of Holies, and mercy seat (seat of grace), and then goes on to portray the role of the mercy seat during Yom Kippur as a prefiguration of the Passion of Christ, which it argues was a greater atonement, and formed a New Covenant (Hebrews 9:3-15);

*

the text continues by stating that the Yom Kippur ritual was merely a shadow of things to come (Hebrews 10:1).

*

The continual sacrifice for sin became obsolete once Jesus had died. This is the whole thrust of Hebrews ch 10, but is especially clearly stated in v11-14. The Epistle to the Romans states that Jesus was sent by God as a propitiation (Romans 3:25), while, perhaps in a reflection on Ezekiel’s atonement ceremony, the Second Epistle to the Corinthians argues that Jesus had become a sin offering (2 Corinthians 5:21).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mercy_seat#In_the_New_Testament
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Propitiation#Propitiation_and_expiation  )
*
*
*
*

the Ark of the Covenant contained   1)  Aaron’s rod,    2)  the first Torah scroll as written by Moses,  and  3)  a jar of manna.

*
*

With our regeneration (& eventual transformation) in the Holy Spirit

(inseparable from the human spirit below, and the same as the raw spirit of the Holy in the Old Testament),

we have 1) conscience, 2) intuition, and 3) fellowship.

http://www.ministrysamples.org/excerpts/THE-THREE-PARTS-OF-THE-SPIRIT-CONSCIENCE-FELLOWSHIP-AND-INTUITION.HTML

 *

*

Conscience, like Aaron’s rod (typology-prefiguration-predictive relationship of the Old Testament to the New Testament — literal horizontal beam of the Cross  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aaron%27s_rod#Christian_use),  is for us to discern right from wrong, to justify or to condemn. Romans 9:1 compared with Romans 8:16 proves that the conscience is a part of our spirit   —      eternal security should never be presented merely as a matter of being once saved, always saved — with no regard for what you believe or do. The writer of Hebrews 12:14 states frankly that only those who continue living holy lives will enter the Lord’s presence.  

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_F._MacArthur#Soteriology

*

*

Intuition, like the Torah scroll http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sefer_Torah,  means to have a direct sense or feeling in our spirit, regardless of reason or circumstance. First Corinthians 2:11 indicates that our spirit can know what our soul cannot. Our soul knows by reason or by circumstance, but our spirit can perceive without these. This is intuition, the direct sense in our spirit.  

*

Fellowship, like manna http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manna#Gathering (not to be confused with opposite Pacifica pagan mana),  is for us to contact God and to commune with God. This is shown in John 4:24 and Romans 1:9.    Godman means that God gave us Jesus so that we could comprehend God thru our own “kind,” so to speak, flesh/blood Jesus.    After all, God’s eternal purpose for us is to be like God.   God finishes what God starts, so that our regenerated spirit perseveres to avert having us reject God and to avert having us intentionally engage in continuous sin, including “deadly” sin.   As erudite Pastor Cathy Poai Simmons intones, we are made in God’s image to be more than  indwelled with the Word of God (Scripture)  — that is, to pour out beyond in the Spirit of God by way of God’s holy spirit in us.   The significance of the Ark of the Covenant is not just to break us out of bondage,  but more so to enjoy Jesus’ throne of grace via Jesus’ mercy seat for us (our seat of grace)    — as we are touched deepest by the throne of the kingdom of God.        According to traditional teachings of Judaism in the Talmud, the tablets of stone (tablets of testimony)  were made of blue sapphire stone as a reminder of  God’s throne.     

*

*

*

*
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cornerstone
*

Book of Ephesians makes clear that Jesus is the cornerstone

*

of faith   (e.g. holy spirit in the process of regeneration, justification, consecration, sanctification, transformation, glorification)

http://www.gotquestions.org/ordo-salutis.html
http://fmcusa.org/uniquelyfm/doctrine/

*

*
*
*

from cogent observer Dale Alter    –

*

*

To Curtis:  

Excellent insights.

*

Our conscience is the mercy seat overshadowed by two real cherubim  for every saint.    

*

Having our consciences cleansed from dead works by the Lamb’s blood 

*

are what open the way for absolute union

*

with the Spirit of the Anointed One.

*

The collective manifestation of the Shekineh glory when we worship together

*

 is the

*

Presence of The Lord in our midst.

*

Love, Dale

*

*

*

*

Prophecy (Coming) of Jesus by way of Old Testament  –

*

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Typology_(theology)#Development_of_typology

Origin of the theory

Christian typology begins in the New Testament itself, with Paul in Romans 5.14 calling Adam “a type [τύπος] of the one who was to come”, i.e. a type of Christ. He contrasts Adam and Christ both in Romans 5 and in 1 Corinthians 15.

The early Christians, in considering the Old Testament, needed to decide what its role and purpose was for them, given that Christian revelation and the New Covenant might be considered to have superseded it, and many specific Old Testament rules and requirements in books such as Leviticus dealing with Expounding of the Law were no longer being followed.  One purpose of the Old Testament for Christians was to demonstrate that the Ministry of Jesus and Christ’s first coming had been prophesied and foreseen, and the Gospels indeed were seen to contain many quotations from the Old Testament which explicitly and implicitly link Jesus to Old Testament prophecies. Typology greatly extended the number of these links by adding to Old Testament prophecies fulfilled by Christ others based on the mere similarity of Old Testament actions or situations to an aspect of Christ.

Typology is also a theory of history, seeing the whole story of the Jewish and Christian peoples as shaped by God, with events within the story acting as symbols for later events – in this role God is often compared to a writer, using actual events instead of fiction to shape his narrative.

Development of typology

The system of Medieval allegory began in the Early Church as a method for synthesizing the seeming discontinuities between the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) and the New Testament. While the Church studied both testaments and saw each as equally inspired by God, the Old Testament contained discontinuities for Christians, for example, the Jewish kosher laws and the requirement for male circumcision. This therefore encouraged seeing at least parts of the Old Testament not as a literal account, but as an allegory, or foreshadowing, of the events of the New Testament, and in particular examining how the events of the Old Testament related to the events of Christ’s life. Most theorists believed in the literal truth of the Old Testament accounts, but regarded the events described as shaped by God to provide types foreshadowing Christ. Others regarded some parts of the Bible as essentially allegorical; however the typological relationships remain the same whichever view is taken. Paul states the doctrine in Colossians 2:16-17 – “Therefore do not let anyone judge you by what you eat or drink, or with regard to a religious festival, a New Moon celebration or a sabbath day. These are a shadow of the things that were to come; the reality, however, is found in Christ.” The idea also finds expression in the Letter to the Hebrews.

The development of this systematic view of the Hebrew Bible was influenced by the thought of the Hellenistic Jewish world centered in Alexandria, where the Jewish philosopher Philo (c. 20 BCE – c. 50 CE) and others viewed Scripture in philosophical terms (contemporary Greek literary theory highlighted foreshadowing as a literary device), as essentially an allegory – using Hellenistic Platonic concepts. Origen (184/185 – 253/254) Christianised the system, and figures including Hilary of Poitiers (c. 300 – c. 368) and Ambrose (c. 340 – 397) spread it. Saint Augustine (345-530) recalled often hearing Ambrose say that “the letter kills but the spirit gives life”, and Augustine in turn became a hugely influential proponent of the system, though also insisting on the literal historical truth of the Bible. Isidore of Seville (ca. 560-636) and Rabanus Maurus (ca. 780-856) became influential as summarizers and compilers of works setting out standardized interpretations of correspondences and their meanings.

Jewish typological thought continued to develop in Rabbinic literature, including the Kabbalah, with concepts like the Pardes – the four approaches to a Biblical text.

Jacob’s Ladder from a Speculum Humanae Salvationis ca. 1430, pre-figuring the Ascension above

Typology frequently emerged in art; many typological pairings appear in sculpture on cathedrals and churches, and in other media. Popular illustrated works expounding typological couplings were among the commonest books of the late Middle Ages, as illuminated manuscripts, blockbooks, and incunabula (early printed books). The Speculum Humanae Salvationis and the Biblia pauperum became the two most successful compilations.

Example of Jonah

The story of Jonah and the fish in the Old Testament offers an example of typology. In the Old Testament Book of Jonah, Jonah told his shipmates to sacrifice him by throwing him overboard. Jonah explained that due to his own death, God’s wrath would pass and that the sea would become calm. Subsequently Jonah then spent three days and three nights in the belly of a great fish before it spat him up onto dry land.

Typological interpretation of this story holds that it prefigures Christ’s burial, the stomach of the fish representing Christ’s tomb: as Jonah exited from the fish after three days and three nights, so did Christ rise from His tomb on the third day. In the New Testament, Jesus invokes Jonah in the manner of a type: “As the crowds increased, Jesus said, ‘This is a wicked generation. It asks for a miraculous sign, but none will be given it except the sign of Jonah.’” Luke 11:29–32 (see also Matthew 12:38–42, 16:1–4). Jonah called the belly of the fish “She’ol“, the land of the dead (translated as “the grave” in the NIV Bible).

Thus whenever one finds an allusion to Jonah in Medieval art or in Medieval literature, it usually represents an allegory for the burial and resurrection of Christ. Other common typological allegories entail the four major Old Testament prophets Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and Daniel prefiguring the four Evangelists Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John; or the twelve tribes of Israel foreshadowing the twelve apostles. Commentators could find countless numbers of analogies between stories of the Old Testament and the New; modern typologists prefer to limit themselves to considering typological relationships that they find sanctioned in the New Testament itself, as in the example of Jonah above.

Other Old Testament examples

Christians believe that Jesus is the mediator of the New Covenant.  In the Sermon on the Mount he commented on the Law. Some scholars consider this to be an antitype of the proclamation of the Ten Commandments or Mosaic Covenant by Moses from mount Sinai.

*
*

Sacrifice of Isaac

Genesis Chapter 22 brings us the story of the preempted sacrifice of Isaac. God asks Abraham to sacrifice his son Isaac to Him, cited as foreshadowing the crucifixion of Jesus. When a suspicious Isaac asks his father “where is the lamb for the burnt offering” Abraham prophesied “God himself will provide the lamb for the burnt offering, my son.” And indeed a ram caught by its horns awaited them, which is also seen as a type for Christ, the lamb that God provides for sacrifice crowned by thorns.

Joseph

Genesis Chapters 37-50 has the story of Joseph in Egypt. Joseph is commonly cited as a Christ type in the story.  Joseph is a very special son to his father. From his father’s perspective Joseph dies and then comes back to life as the ruler of Egypt. Actually Joseph’s brothers deceive their father by dipping his coat in the blood of a sacrificed animal. Later Joseph’s father finds that not only is Joseph alive but he also is the ruler of Egypt that saves the world of his day from a great famine. Other parallels between Joseph and Jesus include, both are rejected by their own people, both became servants, both are betrayed for silver, both are falsely accused and face false witnesses. Additionally, both attain stations at the “right hand” of the respective thrones (Joseph at Pharaoh’s throne and Christ at the throne of God), and both provided for the salvation of gentiles (Joseph a physical salvation in preparing for the famine, while Christ provided the deeper spiritual salvation). Finally, Joseph married an Egyptian wife, bringing her into the Abrahamic lineage, whereas Christ’s relationship with the church is also described in marriage terms in the New Testament.

Moses

Moses, like Joseph and Jonah, undergoes a symbolic death and resurrection. Moses is placed in a basket and floated down the Nile river, and then is drawn out of the Nile to be adopted as a prince (floating the body down the Nile river was also part of an Egyptian funerary ritual for royalty).

While in the wilderness, Moses put a brazen serpent on a pole which would heal anyone bitten by a snake who looked at it (Numbers 21:8). Jesus proclaimed that the serpent was a type of Himself, since “as Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, even so must the Son of man be lifted up” (John 3:14) and “For he hath made him to be sin for us, who knew no sin; that we might be made the righteousness of God in him.” (2Co 5:21)

In a battle with the Amalekites, Exodus 17:11 states that “as long as Moses held up his hands, the Israelites were winning, but whenever he lowered his hands, the Amalekites were winning.” Commentators interpret Moses’ raised hands as a type of Jesus’ raised hands upon the Cross, for when Jesus’ hands were raised as He died, a figurative battle with sin was waged, the end result being victory – that “all will be made alive.” (1 Cor. 15:22)

Inanimate types

Other types were found in aspects of the Old Testament less tied to specific events. The Jewish holidays also have typological fulfillment in the life of Christ. The Last Supper was a Passover meal. Furthermore, many people see the Spring Feasts as types of what Christ will accomplish in his first advent and the Fall Feasts as types of what Christ will accomplish in his second advent.

The Jewish Tabernacle is commonly seen as a series of complex types of Jesus Christ: for example, Jesus describes himself as “the door”,[ and the only “way” to God,[13] represented in the single, wide gate to the tabernacle court; the various layers of coverings over the tabernacle represent Christ’s godliness (in the intricately woven inner covering) and his humanity (in the dull colouring of the outside covering) The Showbread prepared in the Temple of Jerusalem is also seen as a type for Christ.

*

*

*

*

*

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

*

*

Several Christian ethnic Hawaiian Pastors’ “cutting of genealogy”  (breaking generational curses)  are not Biblical    –

*

*
“What does the Bible say about breaking generational curses?”Answer: The Bible mentions “generational curses” in several places (Exodus 20:5; 34:7; Numbers 14:18; Deuteronomy 5:9). God warns that He is “a jealous God, punishing the children for the sin of the fathers to the third and fourth generation of those who hate me.”It sounds unfair for God to punish children for the sins of their fathers. However, there is more to it than that. The effects of sin are naturally passed down from one generation to the next. When a father has a sinful lifestyle, his children are likely to practice the same sinful lifestyle. Implied in the warning ofExodus 20:5 is the fact that the children will choose to repeat the sins of their fathers. A Jewish Targum specifies that this passage refers to “ungodly fathers” and “rebellious children.” So, it is not unjust for God to punish sin to the third or fourth generation – those generations are committing the same sins their ancestors did.There is a trend in the church today to try to blame every sin and problem on some sort of generational curse.
*
This is not Biblical.
*
God’s warning to visit iniquity on future generations is part of the Old Testament Law  (Old Covenant).   A generational curse was (not is) a consequence for a specific nation (Israel) for a specific sin (idolatry). The history books of the Old Testament (especially Judges) contain the record of this divine punishment meted out.
*
The cure for a generational curse has always been repentance.
*
When Israel turned from idols to serve the living God, the “curse” was broken and God saved them (Judges 3:9, 15; 1 Samuel 12:10-11). Yes, God promised to visit Israel’s sin upon the third and fourth generations, but in the very next verse He promised that He would show “love to a thousand [generations] of those who love me and keep my commandments” (Exodus 20:6). In other words, God’s grace lasts a thousand times longer than His wrath.For the Christian who is worried needlessly  about a “generational curse,” the answer is salvation through Jesus Christ.
*
A Christian is a new creation (2 Corinthians 5:17).
*
How can a child of God still be under God’s curse (Romans 8:1)?       No way.
*
The cure for a “generational curse” is repentance of the sin in question, faith in Christ, and a life consecrated to the Lord  (Romans 12:1-2
**
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
Yes, as erudite Pastor Agngaray evokes, we all have the free will to choose between good and evil.

*

Yet, inasmuch the majority of Christians do nothing but “play church,” ergo “Entertainment Tonight   — Hollywood style gossip/celebrities in the world,”

*

most Christians do not pose a danger to Satan,

*

and

*

neither are they of any value to God!!

*
*
*
*
*
quote above is from Cliff Livermore
*

Dorothy Sayers correctly chastens   —  “We cannot repudiate Hell without altogether repudiating Christ.”

*
*
*
*
*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

And just as Jacob gave to his 2nd to youngest son Joseph the birthright of the 1st-born son, ergo 1) authority over family members   2) double portion of inheritance   3) succession in leadership from father Jacob  — and just as Jacob gave to Joseph’s 2nd-born son Ephraim the birthright over 1st-born choice of Joseph  – Manasseh  – after  which Joseph overcame Joseph’s bitterness by lauding the sovereignty and mystery of God  — after all, Joseph was given the same birthright via “unfair” preference thru Jacob    –

*

so do we as disciples of Jesus

*

inherit the traditional birthright

*

with the accompanying responsibilities of 

*

fidelity/integrity to God  (vertical duty) (priestly) and

*

fidelity/integrity to others  (horizontal duty  — fellow creatures of this world) (kingly).

*

*

http://seekersofchrist.org/BIRTH/birthright.html

*

*

*

*

*

*

Essentially,  Nebuchadnezzar  exemplifies the prodigal son (and Jesus is the prodigal son’s father)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parable_of_the_Prodigal_Son

*

albeit 700 yrs. before Luke’s parable.

https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Luke%2015:11-32;&version=NIV

*

Prefiguration (predictive relationship of Old Testament to New Testament)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Typology_(theology)

*

and Daniel’s prophecy (in relation to Luke’s parable 700 yrs. later)

*

intone Jesus’ throne of grace ergo that

*

Jesus yokes equally  (not just the archetype believer/nonbeliever logos)

*

the trip trigger being exhortation to Jesus’ disciples to use their God-given gifts in the service of God,

*

and to

*

take risks for

*

the sake of the

*

Kingdom of

*

God.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

The landowner’s parable of talents (minas) enunciates the same principles.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parable_of_the_talents_or_minas#As_a_teaching_for_Christians

*

*

Just the same, Nebuchadnezzar,  defiled as he was, still had God’s mercy and a chance to redeem himself with our Heavenly Father,

*

though Nebuchadnezzar,

*

like Red Badge of Courage soldier Henry Fleming,

*

ends as he began:

*

In self deception.

*

*

Although Henry Fleming “progresses upwards toward manhood and moral triumph,”  as he begins to mature by taking leave of his previous “romantic notions,”  the education of the hero ends as it began: in self deception.”   

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Red_Badge_of_Courage#Themes

      

*

*

*

*

*

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tower_of_Babel#Themes

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tower_of_Babel#Genre

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Though not to the extent/degree of God’s mercy toward Nebuchadnezzar,

*

 if one posits

*

Nimrod’s explicit motive of cultural and linguistic homogeneity  –

*

God’s actions are not punishment for pride,

*

but a positive etiology (origin of a custom) of cultural differences,

*

presenting Babel

*

not 

*

as the cradle of civilization  –

*

rather, God was concerned that humans had too much freedom to do as they wished, so God brought into existence multiple languages.  Thus, humans were divided into linguistic groups, unable to understand one another.

*

*

http://www.theologyofwork.org/old-testament/genesis-1-11-and-work/god-works-to-keep-his-promise-genesis-9-11/noahs-descendants-and-the-tower-of-babel-genesis-101-1132/

*

Thus, while it appears that God’s scattering of the peoples is a punishment,

*

it actually might be a means/signature of redemption.

*

From the beginning, God intended people to disperse across the world. “Be fruitful and multiply, and fill the earth” (Gen. 1:28).

*

By scattering people after the fall of the tower, God put people back on the path of filling the earth, ultimately resulting in the beautiful array of peoples and cultures that populate it today.

*

If people had completed the tower under a singularity of malicious intent and social tyranny, with the result that “nothing they plan to do will be impossible for them” (Gen. 11:6), we can only imagine the horrors they would have worked in their pride and strength of sin. The scale of evil worked by humanity in the 20th and 21st centuries gives a mere glimpse of what people might do if all things were possible without dependence on God. As Dostoevsky put it, “Without God and the future life, it means everything is permitted.

*

Sometimes God will not give us our way because his mercy toward us is too great.

*

With today’s Vatican’s/Pope’s call for “one world religion,” on the analogous footing of  Nimrod’s explicit motive of cultural and linguistic homogeneity  –

*

one crystalizes the thought of a singularity of purpose with potentially disastrous consequences (the Pope as god).

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

The Bible is all about love in endless abundance,

*

coupled however,

*

with innate principles of responsibility and faith.

*

Wow, the Jews had 700 yrs. head start to figure out God’s mercy and grace before the advent of Luke, and we Gentiles had 2000 yrs. to figure out Jesus’ throne of grace and our ubiquitous mercy seat (extinguish flesh, distinguish spirit)   — and yet none of us “gets it,” so to speak.

*

*

*

*

What do you have in abundance?

*

Out of that abundance, to whom might you be called to seek out and practice abundant generosity?

*

*

*

*

*

*

As Cliff Livermore’s great editor intones,  –

*

Like both the accusers and the woman caught in adultery, none of us has righteousness apart from Christ based on our own terms.

*

We are dealing with a holy God and must be dressed in HIS holiness to enter into the Holy of Holies.

*

We are all sinners,

*

but we get to choose whether we fall upon the Rock

*

or whether the Rock falls upon us.

*

Either way, we get a Rock.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Prophecy (Coming) of Jesus by way of Old Testament  –

*

*

*

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amana_(Bible)

*

Christological (study of Christ) inferences in the context of chapter four of the Song of Solomon suggest a kenotic (‘self-emptying’ of one’s own will and becoming entirely receptive to God’s divine will) significance to Amana (perennial or as site of mountain ergo heaven). The husband (Christ) declares His love for His bride (the Church) throughout chapter four. He (Christ) sees no imperfection in His bride.

*

This is only possible through the descent from heaven through the incarnation and the propitionary death on Calvary, establishing a typology with the Gospels.

*

Amana and the other mountains are allegorical to heaven. The bride’s presence at the summit is possible through the acceptance of Christ resulting in as Paul later expressed it in Ephesians 2:6 being simultaneously “seated in the heavenlies” (figuratively) while walking in the world prior to glorification. The descent from Amana is through the dens of lions which are allegorical to the present dangers of the world and suggesting a typology with Christ’s Passion. The descent from Amana safely through the world (and by implication back to heaven [Amana]) is hand in hand with Christ.

Charles Spurgeon refers to Amana in his famous Morning and Evening devotional for September 18: “To the top of Amana, to the dens of lions, or to the hills of leopards, we will follow our Beloved.”

*

*

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kenosis#New_Testament_usage

*

The New Testament does not use the actual noun kenosis,  but the verb form kenóō occurs five times (Ro.4:14, 1Co.1:17, 9:15, 2Co.9:3, Phil.2:7). Of these five times it is Phil 2:7, in which Jesus is said to have “emptied himself,” which is the starting point of Christian ideas of kenosis.

John the Baptist displayed the attitude when he said of Jesus, “He must become greater; I must become less.” (Jn 3:30).

*

The kenotic ethic is the ethic of Jesus, considered as the ethic of sacrifice. The Philippians passage urges believers to imitate Christ’s self-emptying. In this interpretation, Paul was not primarily putting forth a theory about God in this passage, rather he was using God’s humility exhibited in the incarnation event as a call for Christians to be similarly subservient to others.

*

In Christian theology, kenosis is the concept of the ‘self-emptying’ of one’s own will and becoming entirely receptive to God and the divine will. It is used both as an explanation of the Incarnation, and an indication of the nature of God’s activity and will. Mystical theologian John of the Cross‘ (1542-1591) work “Dark Night of the Soul” is a particularly lucid explanation of God’s process of transforming the believer into the icon or “likeness of Christ.”

*

Another perspective is the idea that God is self-emptying. He poured out himself to create the cosmos and the universe, and everything within it. Therefore, it is our duty to pour out ourselves. (This is similar to C.S. Lewis’ statement in Mere Christianity, that a painter pours his ideas out in his work, and yet remains quite a distinct being from his painting)

*

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ego_death

*

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christian_mysticism#Gospels

*

*

*

*
*

Gospels

*

Transfiguration of Jesus with Moses & Elijah

*

The Christian scriptures, insofar as they are the founding narrative of the Christian church, provide many key stories and concepts that become important for Christian mystics in all later generations: practices such as the Eucharist, baptism and the Lord’s Prayer all become activities that take on importance for both their ritual and symbolic values. Other scriptural narratives present scenes that become the focus of meditation: the Crucifixion of Jesus and his appearances after his Resurrection are two of the most central to Christian theology; but Jesus’ conception, in which the Holy Spirit overshadows Mary, and his Transfiguration, in which he is briefly revealed in his heavenly glory, also become important images for meditation. Moreover, many of the Christian texts build on Jewish spiritual foundations, such as chokhmah, shekhinah.

*

To say, as haughty belligerent J.R Larson exclaims, that the Resurrection outdoes the Crucifixion, is to say that an airplane can fly on one wing (Resurrection) instead of the necessary two wings (including the Crucifixion) for completion/balance.    Christian mystic Pastor Robert Gomes totally transfixed into a pillar of salt J.R. face to face at Pastor Gomes’ ministry off Lanikaula St. in Hilo.

*

But different writers present different images and ideas. The Synoptic Gospels (in spite of their many differences) introduce several important ideas, two of which are related to Greco-Judaic notions of knowledge/gnosis by virtue of being mental acts: purity of heart, in which we will to see in God’s light; and repentance, which involves allowing God to judge and then transform us. Another key idea presented by the Synoptics is the desert, which is used as a metaphor for the place where we meet God in the poverty of our spirit.

The Gospel of John focuses on God’s glory in his use of light imagery and in his presentation of the Cross as a moment of exaltation; he also sees the Cross as the example of agape love, a love which is not so much an emotion as a willingness to serve and care for others. But in stressing love, John shifts the goal of spiritual growth away from knowledge/gnosis, which he presents more in terms of Stoic ideas about the role of reason as being the underlying principle of the universe and as the spiritual principle within all people. Although John does not follow up on the Stoic notion that this principle makes union with the divine possible for humanity, it is an idea that later Christian writers develop. Later generations will also shift back and forth between whether to follow the Synoptics in stressing knowledge or John in stressing love.

*

In his letters, Paul also focuses on mental activities, but not in the same way as the Synoptics, which equate renewing the mind with repentance. Instead, Paul sees the renewal of our minds as happening as we contemplate what Jesus did on the Cross, which then opens us to grace and to the movement of the Holy Spirit into our hearts. Like John, Paul is less interested in knowledge, preferring to emphasize the hiddenness, the “mystery” of God’s plan as revealed through Christ. But Paul’s discussion of the Cross differs from John’s in being less about how it reveals God’s glory and more about how it becomes the stumbling block that turns our minds back to God. Paul also describes the Christian life as that of an athlete, demanding practice and training for the sake of the prize; later writers will see in this image a call to ascetical practices.

*

Within theistic mysticism two broad tendencies can be identified. One is a tendency to understand God by asserting what He is not and the other by asserting what He is. The former leads to what is called apophatic theology and the latter to cataphatic theology.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christian_mysticism#Types_of_meditation

*

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pauline_mysticism#The_mystical_teachings_of_Paul

*
*
*
*

*

*

*

*

*

Even for doubters (agnostics) and especially for nonbelievers (atheists)  –

*

it simply is astonishing and mind-blowing that hypothetically  –

*

we can devise an ethic –

*

a super conscience –

*

to keep us in check –

*

and balance  –

*

to ensure our survival as a species among nature’s creations

*

(ecosystem equilibrium akin to hydrostatic equilibrium  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrostatic_equilibrium#Fluids  ).

*

*

*

*

*
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/11/22/atheist-ten-commandments_n_6198734.html?utm_hp_ref=mostpopular
*
The 10 “non-commandments” — the atheist’s irreducible statements of atheist and humanist belief  –
*
I. The world is real, and our desire to understand the world is the basis for belief.
II. We can perceive the world only through our human senses.
III. We use rational thought and language as tools for understanding the world.
IV. All truth is proportional to the evidence.
V. There is no God.
VI. We all strive to live a happy life. We pursue things that make us happy and avoid things that do not.
VII. There is no universal moral truth. Our experiences and preferences shape our sense of how to behave.
VIII. We act morally when the happiness of others makes us happy.
IX. We benefit from living in, and supporting, an ethical society.
X. All our beliefs are subject to change in the face of new evidence, including these.

*

*

*

Cry if you have to  –

*
Let it out. It’s not normal to get an infection from a paper cut or celebrate a holiday alone.

I make peace with  loneliness by acknowledging the absurdity of it.

*

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jessica-gimeno/4-tips-on-celebrating-a-h_b_6222380.html?utm_hp_ref=gps-for-the-soul&ir=GPS%20for%20the%20Soul

*

*

*

*
*
Understandably, here is new ager pantheist Chopra’s ‘sure’ list  –
*
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/deepak-chopra/why-god-makes-more-sense-_b_6212042.html?utm_hp_ref=books&ir=Books
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/deepak-chopra/how-richard-dawkins-lost-_b_6172040.html?utm_hp_ref=books&ir=Books
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/wray-herbert/hard-to-think-straight-pr_b_6200306.html?utm_hp_ref=science
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/10/22/pan-american-health-organ_n_6029402.html?utm_hp_ref=gps-for-the-soul&ir=GPS%20for%20the%20Soul
*
  1. Science isn’t by definition anti-religious.
  2. Atheists have a point when they accuse organized religion of a litany of gross failings, including crusades, jihads, and the Inquisition. But religions are human institutions prone to every human failing. Religious history is about us, not about whether God exists.
  3. God can be approached without resorting to the cultural mythology of a humanized Father and Mother watching over us from Heaven. Atheists largely attack this myth, but smashing a myth doesn’t mean you’ve smashed reality.
  4. There is a rich tradition, both East and West, of an impersonal God. This God is the source of consciousness and all that we associate with consciousness: self-awareness, intelligence, creativity, evolution, etc.
  5. The experience of God is found inside our own consciousness, not “out there” in a supernatural realm.
*
  1. If all experience is subjective, going inward is a valid means of exploring reality.
  2. In this exploration, new levels of consciousness reveal themselves.
  3. At deeper levels of consciousness, perception changes radically.
  4. As perception changes, so does reality itself, since nothing is real for us beyond what we can perceive in some way.
  5. The conjunction of the individual mind with the source of consciousness is where God lives.
*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Profound and inexplicable that we “first mold” (archetype typology) instinctively (internal drive)

*

for some paradigm (pattern/creation)

*

greater than the self

*

as the only real (sane — fulfilling) path

*

for finding a whole complete self.

*

*

Jungian scholars posit that inside every human heart is a personal picture of the divine, be it a personal God or an uninvolved pantheistic entity.

*

*

Agnostics/atheists posit that Jews have imago dei (image of God), whereas Christians have imago Christo (image of Christ).

*

*

*

*

*

Symbols are the language of dreams. A symbol can invoke a feeling or an idea and often has a much more profound and deeper meaning than any one word can convey.

http://www.dreammoods.com/dreamdictionary/

*

Symbols (other persons/things)  often “mask” the actual person/thing  (of one’s deepest secrets and hidden feelings –

unresolved conflicts discoverable via transference, as an example

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychoanalytic_dream_interpretation#Contemporary_psychoanalytic_approach

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transference

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Displacement_(psychology)    )

 –

*

inasmuch the real person/thing emblematic of  immense suffering stretches oneself (e.g. the dreamer) into the vortex of vulnerability –

*

a psychic well so deep that is not without grave cost    –

*

perhaps in the extreme instance  –   to die as one lived –  as a person of self-determination and self-worth.

*

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/11/02/brittany-maynard-death_n_6077482.html?utm_hp_ref=religion

*

Yet, in the depths of despair, absurdity, and indifference of life,

*

one finds the deepest connectedness, the deepest continuity,

*

with the primary humanity which defines you  –

*

 the piety of being who you are because someone loved you.

*

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/kathleen-anderson/why-cornel-west-loves-jan_b_6140744.html?utm_hp_ref=books

*

*

*

*

Similarly   –

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesus_in_Christianity#Parables

the parables of Jesus represent a major component of his teachings in the gospels, the approximately thirty parables forming about one third of his recorded teachings.   The parables may appear within longer sermons, as well as other places within the narrative.

*

Jesus’ parables are seemingly simple and memorable stories, often with imagery, and each conveys a teaching which usually

*

relates the physical world to the spiritual world.

*

In the 19th century, Lisco and Fairbairn stated that in the parables of Jesus, “the image borrowed from the visible world is accompanied by a truth from the invisible

*

(spiritual)  world,”

*

and that the parables of Jesus are not “mere similitudes which serve the purpose of illustration, but are internal analogies where nature becomes a witness for the spiritual world.”   Similarly, in the 20th century, calling a parable “an earthly story with a heavenly meaning,”  William Barclay states that the parables of Jesus use familiar examples to lead others’ minds towards heavenly concepts. He suggests that Jesus did not form his parables merely as analogies but based on an “inward affinity between the natural and the spiritual order.”

 *
*

*

*

*

Joshua’s trek toward the land of milk and honey (no shortage of faith), unlike Moses’ early failed quest (shortage of faith)   — is a representation of Jesus cometh.    In this sense Joshua’s parable gave ample opportunities for the “chosen ones” to indwell with Christ, and to pour out beyond in the spirit of the Holy.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laodicean_Church#.22I_wish_that_you_were_cold_or_hot.22_.28Revelation_3:15.E2.80.9316.29

*

Thence, lukewarm (Laodicea) is self-deception (one foot in the world, one foot in the spirit)    — worse than cold, so to speak    –

*

“I wish that you were cold or hot” (Revelation 3:15–16)

*

“I know thy works, that thou art neither cold nor hot: I would thou wert cold or hot. So then because thou art lukewarm, and neither cold nor hot, I will spew thee out of my mouth.”

*

The Laodiceans were criticized for their neutrality or lack of zeal (hence “lukewarm”).  Based on this understanding, the pejorative term Laodicean is used in the English language to refer to those neutral or indifferent in matters of faith.

*

The Laodicean Church in the Revelation of John (Revelation 3:14–22)

*

In John’s vision, recorded in the book of Book of Revelation, Christ instructs John to write a message to the seven churches of Asia Minor. The message to Laodicea is one of judgment with a call to repentance. The oracle contains a number of metaphors.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

http://www.gty.org/resources/sermons/90-233/What-is-Sin

*

Psychologists reject sin because they want to exalt man, and they want to eliminate God.  So, because they reject sin, they have no explanation for why man is the way he is.  They misdiagnose him totally, so they offer really no help.  And what do we do?  We try to come up with harsher penalties, the, what is it, the three-strike law: three felonies in a row and you go to jail and they throw the key away.  We bring back the death penalty.  But nothing can end the reign of terror; nothing can end the reign of corruption.  You can’t do it with counseling.  You can’t do it with psychotherapy.  You can’t do it with Prozac.  You can’t do it, because the issue is sin.  The issue is: we’ve all inherited a corrupted nature.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to The Bible just blows me away, baby! Example: It’s no accident that Jesus, as the lamb of God, was born in a manger

  1. Pingback: Typology — representation of Jesus in the Old Testament | Curtis Narimatsu

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s